Linda Reymore

Born in: 1949
Lives in: Stuart, Florida
Describe your art in three words: Whatever you see
Discipline: Painting, Mixed media
Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts, St. Mary's College, Notre Dame, Indiana
Master of Science in Marketing Communications, Roosevelt University, Chicago, Illinois
See More Work:  https://lindareymore.com/

The Anniversary - Acrylics, Ink, Modeling Medium on Canvas 36 x 24 in

"My artistic process resembles a puzzle where each piece contributes to either the overall harmony or intentional dissonance of my composition. Thumbnail sketches combined with several computer programs are useful tools that allow me to increase my creativity and refine my ideas."

What themes does your work involve?
Typically, my creations are abstract, non-objective, and experimental, without adherence to any specific theme. However, currently, I'm delving into the manipulation and assembly of distinct shapes into broader, overarching forms, frequently imbued with anthropomorphic qualities and arrangements. This marks my "Whimsy" phase.
Describe your creative process.
My art practice focuses on abstraction and experimentation, rotating shape, form, line, texture, and color, using varied materials on canvas without a specific narrative intent. This approach provides me with a dynamic range of creative possibilities, continual challenges, and inspirational sources. Currently, I find myself veering toward a whimsical style, often featuring anthropomorphic subjects, where the playfulness of form and color take precedence.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
After completing my visual art studies in college, I ventured outside the art realm professionally. However, my passion for the arts never waned. I became extensively involved with various art organizations, including a notable 17-year stint as the volunteer executive director of a youth symphony. I've always been inspired by the dedication of the musicians and visual artists I encountered, and by the 20th-century contemporary artists. Their relentless pursuit of beauty, emotion, and intellectual stimulation through fundamental principles continues to fuel my artistic aspirations. Having retired, I can reconnect with my own artistry, driven by the sheer joy of creative exploration and aesthetic appreciation.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
“Good” art necessitates the artist's complete conceptualization—an adept understanding of the idea conveyed and the medium used—and the artist's discernment of when a piece reaches completion. Exceptional art emerges through a universally understandable expression of a concept while offering a deliberate ambiguity, fostering viewer engagement through personal experience both intellectually and emotionally.
What is the role of the artist today?
I don’t believe there is a single designated role for artists today. Just as each member of society fulfills a unique role in relation to others, artists also adopt diverse roles. Some may seek to convey personal emotions, articulate opinions, champion ideas, or narrate stories. As an artist, I perceive my role like that of a researcher in other disciplines—engaging in exploration and experimentation with artistic principles and recording my discoveries in physical form.
What Does a Bot Look Like? - Acrylics, Ink on Canvas 24 x 24 in
Queuing - Acrylics, Ink on Raw Canvas 24 x 48 in
The Cocktail Party - Acrylics, Ink on Canvas 24 x 48 in
Wobot - Acrylics, Ink on Canvas 30 x 30 in

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Yanping Lu

Born in: 1965, Shanghai, China
Lives in: Dublin, OH, USA
Describe your art in three words: Expressive; Meaningful; Communicative.
Discipline: Painting, Digital Media, Illustration, Watercolor, Mixed media, Collage, Drawing, Video, Textile Arts, Crafts
Education: Master of Educational Informatics from Japan Tohoku University.
Bachelor of Fine Arts from China Hubei Institute of Fine Arts.
See More Work:  https://redwoodartgroup.com/product/vivid-bird-series-1/ ; https://www.smart2d3d.com/ ; https://www.instagram.com/art2d3d/ ; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=61556114680671 ; https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanping-lu-2625122bb/

"I am Yanping Lu, merging Shanghai's vibrancy with Hollywood's allure. My art, inspired by my mother's bold textiles, blends traditional Chinese craftsmanship with Japanese digital precision. My collections, viewers on a profound journey of beauty and introspection."

What themes does your work involve?
1. Character theme series: Charm Symbol: Glamour Gaze Series Charm Symbol Series Elegance Spectrum Series . 2 Flowers and Birds: Feather Hues Series Vivid Bird Series
Describe your creative process.
My creative process begins with inspiration, often drawn from a deep connection to the beauty of nature and human emotions. I start by sketching out ideas and experimenting with colors and forms that can convey the emotions I intend to express. For instance, in my "Glamour Gaze" series, I explore the interaction of facial expressions with visual effects of balance and anamorphic design on a two-dimensional canvas, creating a dynamic sense of movement that symbolizes the vitality of the character’s features. Throughout the painting process, I meticulously control the relationship between overall and local forms, as well as the contrast between warm and cool colors, layering colors and textures until I achieve the depth and intensity of emotion I envisioned.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I grew up in a family where both parents had a deep love for music, dance, and fashion, profoundly influencing my understanding of art. The graceful elegance of black-and-white Hollywood movie stars ignited my artistic inspiration and has become an indispensable element in my work. Additionally, my mother's exquisite skill in tailoring, especially her exaggerated Hollywood-style bras, shaped my appreciation of the feminine form's beauty. These influences are deeply embedded in my artistic creations, driving my lifelong pursuit of beauty.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is the harmonious integration of "Art" and "Technique." Here, "Art" is not just about an idea or concept, but deeply ingrained in cultural traditions and artistic cultivation, encompassing design principles and aesthetic functions that serve the profound significance and practicality of the artwork. "Technique," on the other hand, focuses on the technical aspects of artistic expression, such as proficient use of painting tools, a wealth of painting skills, and the expressive power of forms and colors. The success of an artwork largely depends on how effectively these elements are combined, thereby not only satisfying visual aesthetics but also touching the viewer's heart.
What is the role of the artist today?
As an artist, my motivation stems from a deep need to express my inner world through art. Art provides me with a unique language that allows me to explore and articulate the complexities of human experience. By engaging in art education and professional creation, I seek not only personal expression but also to inspire others to discover and appreciate the diversity of beauty. My journey into art began with a profound fascination with beauty and a desire for creativity. The power of art lies in its ability to transcend linguistic and cultural boundaries, touching people's hearts through visual and emotional resonance. My curiosity drives me to continually explore different forms of art, with each creation being an exploration of self-expression and artistic potential.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Peter Dee

Born in: Ireland
Lives in: Dublin, Ireland
Describe your art in three words: Simple, colourful, peaceful
Discipline: Painting
See More Work:  peterdee.ie

Vintage Enamelware with Lemons - Oil 50 x 50 cm

"Still Life is the main subject matter on which Peter has concentrated. He paints all his subjects from life, using only natural light. This light transforms simple objects in Peter’s still life compositions into visually exciting images full of vibrant colour combinations. He strives to capture the effects of light as it affects various surfaces on objects such as fruit, bottles, earthenware, etc."

What themes does your work involve?
Still Life is the main subject matter on which I have concentrated in my art career. In the tradition of still life painting, I paint all my subjects from life, using only natural light. The theme or concept for my still life paintings can be anything from a simple arrangement of fruit to a more complex setup with various objects that tell a story or convey a mood. I select objects based on the theme and objects are chosen for their shapes, colours, textures, and how they relate to each other. I arrange these objects on a surface, considering composition principles such as balance, contrast, harmony, and focal points. The arrangement is often tested and adjusted until I achieve the desired visual effect.
Describe your creative process.
In planning to create a still life painting, I begin with looking at the composition and how it will work on the canvas. I arrange objects within the canvas frame so that they are visually pleasing and well-balanced and create a harmonious composition. I use of natural light to greatly enhance the mood and atmosphere of my still life set-ups. I try to create interesting shadows, highlights, and reflections that add depth and dimension to the objects. I capture intricate textures in my work, such as the roughness on rusted enamelware, the vibrant colours of various fruits or the smoothness of a ceramic vase. I generally choose a colour palette that complements the objects and creates a visually appealing harmony.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My work can be influenced by numerous factors including the beauty and complexity of the natural world. This inspires me to create beautiful paintings using contemporary still life objects. I love the vibrant colour of various fruits, brightly red and green apples, coloured green grapes, vibrant oranges, etc. My still life painting include antique objects such as rusted vintage enamelware objects, shiny copper jugs, antique oriental vases and bowls, etc. Other still life artists influence and inspire me and I love the works of contemporary Dutch artists such as Willem de Bont and Henk Helmantel. I continue to make art because I love painting and I am inspired by people who admire or purchase my work. I try to paint for a few hours daily as I find it very peaceful and a very relaxing.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
This is a difficult question to answer because people often have different opinions of what is good art. On a basic level, if someone likes a piece of art, it is a great piece of art in their eyes. Personally, I think what makes art great is how a painting makes you feel emotionally. The greatness of a painting is subjective and can vary from person to person. However, there are certain qualities that are often associated with great paintings such as paintings that demonstrate a high level of technical proficiency, have the power to evoke strong emotions and have the ability to transcend time and remain relevant and impactful across different eras..
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because I love to paint. As a teenager I always loved to draw and paint but it wasn’t until I grew older that I began to take up art seriously. I am drawn to still life because I like the stillness and colour of objects on a table top and the objects don’t move or change under controlled light. I believe the role of the artist today is the ability to express our unique perspectives, emotions, and ideas through our chosen art medium. As artists we play a vital role in preserving and celebrating cultural heritage. We have the ability to captivate and inspire audiences through our creativity.
Stoneware Bottles & Jars - Oil 30 x 30 cm
Box of Eggs - Oil 30 x 30 cm
Bowl of Rainer Cherries - Oil 30 x 30 cm
Vintage Enamelware with Cherries - Oil 60 x 60 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Christopher Pothier

Born in: Chelsea, Massachusetts, USA
Lives in: Columbia Gorge, Oregon, USA
Describe your art in three words: Honest. Narrative. Figurative
Discipline: Painting
Education: BFA- University of Massachusetts at Amherst
See More Work:  https://www.christopherpothier.com

Lilliputian Crossroad - Oil on Panel 22 x 35 in

"I feel that my main responsibility, as an artist, is to be true to myself and to make images that are honest and involve my thoughts completely without pretense or segmentation. I seek to tell my stories as I can only do, not to make images in an attempt to please others or to garner favors. I want to leave this world knowing that in my lifetime, I didn’t leave anything on the table."

What themes does your work involve?
Themes I use include: human behavior, societal trends, social pressures/norms, dreams, life/death, conformity, sexuality, etc. I'm obsessed with the way humans operate and behave, especially in modern society.
Describe your creative process.
Almost every painting I make starts with a vision that enters my mind. That is the way it has always been. I try not to force my ideas, I let them flow as they would, naturally, without pressure. This never stops. I sketch these in my notebooks and add some written notes so I can remember the themes and recall them from my mind. These sketches will sometimes remain in my notebooks for many years until I get to them. One thing I have an endless supply of is ideas. In fact, I have so many ideas that it would take hundreds of years to get them all out. I feel incredibly fortunate to have this problem.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I spend a lot of time listening to books and podcasts about history, mostly ancient history, in order to understand how societies were formed and people behaved. I also follow the current news, foreign and domestic, so I can stay on top of things that are happening currently. Philosophy is also a major love of mine and has been since I was a child. I'm very interested in how we, as people, act. All of these things, combined with my own personal life experiences, are fuel for these visions and the images just pour out of my head and eventually make it to my paintings. That is the reason I became a painter, because I had to relieve myself of all the visions that would invade my mind. It became my lifelong outlet. I make art to tell my stories to the people.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
We all know that art is very subjective but, that being said, there are a few rules which apply. Art can be good if it hits one one or two of these rules. Great art hits all of them. Rule 1: Art must be honest. Art that is not honest is not art at all, it is merely creating a thing according to a current trend which is nothing more than a commodity. Artists should not make commodities. Rule 2: Art must have balance. Balance, while subjective, is universally human. We all agree that a giant waterfall is a thing of beauty, or that a tiger is wondrous, so, therefore, balance is a shared human trait. Rule 3: Art must tell a story. Whether real or fake, good art has a narrative quality which take us on journeys, short or long, stupid or brilliant, but a story is told.
What is the role of the artist today?
I really didn't seek to be an artist, it really discovered me. It sounds a bit corny, but it is true. When I was a young teen, I just got bombarded with thoughts and philosophies that were vivid and formed pictures. I needed to get these out of my head, so I tried to use writing to release them. This did not work, my words did not do the job sufficiently. Painting was the only option for me to release these ideas. Coming from a military family, I did not know about art. It was the furthest thing from me. I was introduced to painting later in my teens by an incredible teacher, a philosopher of sorts. I sank myself into this world and became obsessed from the start. Having loads of catching up to do, I dedicated my whole life to the practice of oil painting. That was in 1994.
Hank's Fever Dream - Oil on Panel 30 x 40 in
The Distorted Nature of Daydreaming - Oil on Panel 21 x 36 in
The Resurrection of the Cowboy Kid - Oil on Panel 33 x 60 in
La Revolucion de los Ninos - Oil on Panel 30 x 38 in

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Patrizia Vignola

Born in: New York, USA
Lives in: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Describe your art in three words: Figurative, Surreal, Imaginative
Discipline: Painting, Drawing
Education: Master of Fine Arts, New York Academy of Art
See More Work:  https://patriziavignola.com/

"While rooted in figurative realism, I delve into deeper, emotional, philosophical dimensions. The use of ruff collars in my work transcends mere ornamentation and manifests as a symbol of personal significance. My work is a critical examination of societal norms and explores themes of birth circumstances, identity, interconnectedness, and provokes thoughts on the human experience."

What themes does your work involve?
Innocence, socioeconomic status, birth circumstances, the human condition, the human psyche, identity, struggle, universal connections.
Describe your creative process.
Sometimes it is the visual image of someone and an emotional connection that sparks a conceptual idea for a series. Once that seed is planted, I build upon the series by searching for other "faces" that hold the same idea for me. One series usually blends or flows into the next. I work primarily in oils and drawing materials. But,I always start with the drawing. Sometimes it is a finished rendering that is then used to create an oil painting, other times it is just a quick sketch of an idea and then onto a painting surface, now and then I go right from an idea in my mind to the panel I make the painting on. However, often times the concept comes first, then I research faces, other living things from nature, the right ruff collar and put things together to express my ideas.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
What influences and inspires me is the universe, the struggles of being human, the idea of infinity, the ridiculous importance we put on power and money as a society, life in general/human existence, music, my daughter, my students, other artists and the beauty of the world. I make art to connect with others in a profound way. I seem to have a deep need to do this and creating visual art is the language I use to communicate.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me good art doesn’t fit in a genre. It is when it’s evident that the artist is fully invested in their work, they have spent time finding their unique way of creating and the means in which they create is how they communicate. Great art exemplifies the artists commitment and dedication to their artistic practice, and it evokes thoughts and emotions in others.
What is the role of the artist today?
I think today more than ever the role of the artist is to preserve what is fundamentally human. Our distinction from other living things on the planet is that we generate ideas in our brains and visuals in our minds eye and from those we create. When a work of art is in front of us that takes our breath away, whether it’s a piece of music, a painting, a poem, or some other form of artistic expression, it speaks to us without descriptions on an unmatched level and it reminds us of what it really means to be human. Artists need to keep doing this as they always have for the preservation of humanity.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Schmidt

Born in: 1956, Germany
Lives in: Munich, Germany
Describe your art in three words: Photography without camera
Discipline: Photography, Other: photogram
Education: Diploma in Photography/Communicationsdesign at the Folkwang School/University Essen
See More Work:  https://photograms-deluxe.com

Tulip Blossom - Fine Art Pigment Print on Baryta Paper, 46 x 59 cm

"Skin on skin, dancing cheek to cheek. That's it. Direct contact with light-sensitive material. That’s what makes a photogram such an extraordinary image and an unmistakably unique piece."

What themes does your work involve?
Very diverse, an incredibly wide range. Anything motionless. Natural objects, musical instruments, memories, seasons, technology, various forms and manifestations of positive feelings.
Describe your creative process.

I usually get ideas when I’m fascinated by a person or an object Creating photograms is a complex process. It begins in a completely darkened room.  After positioning the light sources often covered with colored foils and adjusting their brightness the light-sensitive material is then taken out of its packaging in the dark, fixed to a flat surface.The person and/or objects are placed in position using a night vision device or by touch. Then my concentration is at its utmost and the shutter is released, the photogram has been exposed.The final step is development, which takes place in a special laboratory, The moment of truth comes afterwards. I’m either happy when I see the result, or annoyed when the photogram doesn't meet my expectations and all the work was in vain.

What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I studied photography at the Folkwangschule in Essen because I was so impressed by Otto Steinert's work. Then, of course, there are Floris Neusüss with his body photograms and the classics by Man Ray, László Moholy-Nagy and Christian Schad. These days I’m inspired by all kinds of things, museums and exhibitions, but also, as I said, by the many forms nature takes on, but basically the idea of ​​how something will look in direct contact with photographic paper or film when when you only see the form and the contours. When you express something out of that. I “make art” because I can't help it. Maybe it’s in my genes. In any case, it’s an inner urge that I have to follow.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
“Good art” is whatever makes me do at least a double take, what touches me, engages me and kidnaps my thoughts, whether it be visual art, sculpture, photography, performance, or film. Am I leaving anything out? I like whatever grabs you and doesn't let you go. When it creates a certain tension, makes you curious, provokes you or maybe just radiates sublime calm and harmony.
What is the role of the artist today?
I'm an artist because I just can't help it. I want my work to spread positive vibes. Artists offer people pieces that inspire, fascinate and move them. Their work is soul food, so to speak... The role of artists today is not much different than it always has been: they provoke, they heal, they unite, they resist.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Mike DeCesare

Born in: 1950, United States
Lives in: Spokane, Washington, United States
Describe your art in three words: Once and Always
Discipline: Photography
Education: New York Institute of Photography, graduate
University of Illinois, Bachelor of Science
See More Work:  https://www.ProPhotoNorthwest.com

Vacancy Photography on 100% cotton rag 16 x 11 in.

"My work explores the bonds between people and nature, each picture opening a window beyond the frame, where you may find a memory you cannot forget, or a memory you have yet to create. The images are physical, but and the imprints and interpretations are purely personal, as unique as each person willing to look through the window."

What themes does your work involve?
Time is fleeting, memories are not.
Describe your creative process.
A willing collaboration is fundamental to my creative approach and process. I do not try to enforce my will upon a digital photo negative with sophisticated software skills and techniques. Instead, I treat every image as a friend, and try to see and listen to what assistance I might provide for a picture to reach its potential.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Mountains soar and oceans roar because the beauty of our natural world is the result of nature’s profound fury, created in infinitesimal movements. Who cannot be touched, moved – and inspired- by such extraordinary outcomes, never over, yet seemingly permanent. Are we any different?
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is, in my opinion, what profoundly touches you. Great art is what profoundly touches all of us.
What is the role of the artist today?
Everyday life tempts us to look outward, while the artist entices us to look inward.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


LUO RONGRONG

“I have been dedicated to seeking, capturing, and accurately representing life experiences that transcend the barriers and limitations of Eastern and Western cultures through various experiments in graphic narration (both abstract and concrete).”

Lovely Xinjiang No. 41 Kazakh Shaman, 2023 Ink on Paper, Photoshop 57 x 41 cm €300

Luo Rongrong earned her Ph.D. in Arts from Kyoto Seika University in Japan, following her studies at the Chinese National Academy of Art from 2023 to 2024. Throughout her illustrious career, she has consistently received invitations to participate in prestigious group exhibitions and has held captivating solo shows in notable locations worldwide, including Austria, France, the United States, Japan, Poland, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, and South Korea.

Recognized for her exceptional artistic talent, Luo Rongrong has amassed numerous international and national awards, affirming her skill and creativity. Her renowned piece, "Czerwone Króliki" (Red Rabbits), was published by Hanami Press in Poland in 2011, further solidifying her status as a distinguished artist.

Luo Rongrong's remarkable abilities have also led to her involvement in prominent projects. In 2020, she was selected for the esteemed "Illustration Talent Cultivation for Children's Books" initiative by the China National Arts Fund (CNAF). Additionally, she was chosen for the "Rural Revitalization-themed Lianhuanhua Talent Cultivation" project of CNAF in 2023, underscoring her expertise and dedication to artistic development.

Lovely Xinjiang No. 38 Kazakh Hunter, 2023 Ink on Paper, Photoshop 57 x 41 cm €300
Lovely Xinjiang No. 1 Saint Stone, 2023 Ink on Paper, Photoshop 57 x 41 cm €300
Lovely Xinjiang No. 25 Saint Stone, 2023 Ink on Paper, Photoshop 57 x 41 cm €300
Lovely Xinjiang No. 27 Populus Euphratica Forest, 2023 Ink on Paper, Photoshop 57 x 41 cm €300

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Joachim Lombard

“Taking photographs requires a specific kind of energy. The possibility of a well-balanced black & white composition totally distorts the reality in front of me. There's potential in everything.”

IMPRUDENCE NYC #5 - Analog Photograph 18 x 24 in €700

Joachim Lombard, a photographer with three decades of experience, has dedicated his career to capturing the essence of Parisian and Manhattan streets. Employing the same analogical equipment throughout his journey—consisting of a Pentax K1000, a 50mm lens, and Tri-X Kodak films—Lombard has honed his craft with a steadfast commitment to simplicity and consistency.

His latest series, "Imprudence," exemplifies his mastery of black and white photography. Utilizing reflections found in windows, mirrors, and puddles, Lombard skillfully crafts images that evoke a sense of depth, texture, and ambiguity. Through this technique, he invites viewers to experience a momentary suspension of reality, as if floating through the captured scene.  

IMPRUDENCE NYC #1 - Analog Photograph 18 x 24 in €700
IMPRUDENCE NYC #2 - Analog Photograph 18 x 24 in €600
IMPRUDENCE NYC #8 - Analog Photograph 18 x 24 in €600
IMPRUDENCE NYC #3 - Analog Photograph 18 x 24 in €600

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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TU-TZU-HUA

“I love creating in the world of art. Each time, I search for new styles without limitations because I want to create many paintings of my own while I'm alive. To me, art is a companion and a dialogue with my soul, freely expressing in the world of painting.”

Dream Lullaby - Acrylic, Mixed Media 25 x 25 cm TWD 12,000

Tu-Tzu-Hua, born in 1084 in Taiwan, finds joy in painting as a means of self-expression. For Tu-Tzu-Hua, each blank canvas offers an opportunity to explore and convey personal colors and emotions. Every interaction with a painting presents a fresh challenge, driving the continuous quest to develop a distinctive artistic style. Painting serves as a medium for Tu-Tzu-Hua to soar freely within the realm of art, leaving behind records of experiences and capturing moments of beauty within the constraints of time.

Flower Girl 5 - Acrylic, Mixed Media 31 x 41 cm TWD 30,000
Fantasy World - Acrylic, Mixed Media 100 x 80 cm TWD 160,000
Flowers Envy - Acrylic, Mixed Media 46 x 53 cm TWD 40,000
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Acrylic, Mixed Media 55 x 69 cm TWD 75,000

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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