Dorothea Van De Winkel

Dorothea is an independent textile artist and designer since 1985. She operates her own gallery “Galerij Theaxus” from September 1992 with exhibition rooms and the possibility to visit the studio, where the hand-woven tapestries are designed and made.
ATB13 Highfield Hall Gardens, MA, USA 27 01-27 03 21

Moving Circle V, 2010 - Tapestry 80 x 80 cm

"I lived in the center of the town of Oudenaarde (East-Flanders, Belgium), a historic city renowned for its ancient hand-woven tapestries. I was very impressed by the skills needed and the fine art behind this craft. From this background, I started searching and collecting any information I could find on materials (wool, silk,…), the tools, the colours and the patterns. I wanted to know everything about it, from design to realization."

The designs of Dorothea Van De Winkel are abstract. She realizes wall and floor tapestries, which can be wholly integrated into a house (colours, form and size). The realizations can be seen as living, stand-alone art objects, or as the center point, elementary piece or material for interior design. Furthermore, tapestry can be used in modern buildings for muting sound transmission and it adds a feeling of warmth.

 


 

Select exhibitions

2021 ATB 13 Highfield Hall & Gardens, MA, USA – January 27, 2021 – March 27, 2021

San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles, CA, USA - July 18, 2021-October 3, 2021

2020 The 13th International Textile Art Biennial “Scythia”, Ivano-Frankivs’k, Ukraine

2020 The Virtual Exhibition of UNESCO & MEADOWS artists against COVID-19, Beirut, Lebanon

2018 Solo Exhibition, Contemporary Tapestries, Mou Museum of Oudenaarde and Flemish Ardennes, Townhouse de Oudenaarde, Belgium

2017 7th International Biennial of Contemporary Textile Art: DIVERSITY, the SUBTE, Montevideo, Uruguay

2016 From Lausanne to Beijing, 9th International Fiber Art Biennale, Guan Shan Yue Art Museum, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China

2016 The 11th International Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary Textile Art "Scythia", Kherson, Ukraine

 

Select Awards

2016 Bronze Medal, Scythia, the 11 International Biennial Exhibition, Kherson, Ukraine.

2008 Excellent Price, From Lausanne to Beijing 2008, Beijing, China

Tornado In The Field II, 2016 - Tapestry 185 x 240 cm
Blue Landscape I, 2018 - Tapestry 100 x 120 cm
In The Open Field I, 2014 - Tapestry 185 x 240 cm
Blue Landscape II, 2018 - Tapestry 100 x 120 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Hong Liu-Sertti

“I moved to Finland, lived in a Finnish-Chinese family and received art education in both places for nearly 20 years. Over the years, my creative themes have always been freedom and love in conflict and harmony.”

Love to be free - Mixed media on rice paper on canvas 80 x 60 cm

“I have moved to Finland, lived in a Finnish-Chinese family and received art education in both countries for nearly 20 years. Over the years, my creative theme has always been freedom and love in conflict and harmony. People, birds and stamps are the main elements of my works. People are shown meticulously in the context of freehand brushwork. The bird is a metaphor for freedom. The stamp has been regarded as an important element since the composition of the painting and is closely integrated with the image. The words of the stamp include ancient Chinese poetic phrases, such as "流水香 Flowing Water Fragrant", "草惊风 Wind Blowing Grass ", etc., and some inscriptions, such as "Love" and "自由 Freedom"; there are Chinese and English as well as Finnish, such as "Running tree" and "Vapaus" and many more.

With the use of ink, color and gold foil, stamps and patterns, concrete and abstract, exaggeration and realism, I constantly transform contradictions into harmony. The forests and lakes of Finland are the backgrounds of my work. The wonderful forest contains various life forces. Everything takes its place in the crowd. The lake reflects the brilliance of various spirits. The individual's soul poured out in the silence, joyously in the constant flow. Multiculturalism gives creativity an endless drive."

Hong Liu-Sertti has had solo shows at Pori Art Museum, Finland and South China Art Museum. She has been in group shows including the Official Pavilion of Bangladesh 58th Venice Biennale as well as Art Basel Miami Beach among others.

Featu2021
Spring - Mixed media on rice paper on canvas 80 x 60 cm
Walking Tree Flying time - Mixed media on rice paper on canvas 20 x 15 cm
Bliss - Mixed media on rice paper on canvas 20 x 15 cm
Dream in Coronavirus Pandemic - Mixed media on rice paper on canvas 80 x 60 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Peter Backhaus

Born 1947, Germany

Lives in: Holsljunga, Sweden

Describe your art in three words: Expressive, unpredictable, archetypal

See More Work:  www.peterbackhaus.net | instagram.com/artatbackhaus/

Shadow Movement I - Oil on canvas 200 x 150 cm

"My art is uncompromising and direct. It is unique in its poetic, musical expression. The heart is its abode. It connects with the soul's longing for freedom, co-creation and participatory commitment.. I call my style ‘Archetypical Expressionism’."

What themes does your work involve?
As I said, I work as uncontrolled and spontaneous as I can, with no plan or particular idea from the beginning. Just trying to remain in the Now as long as possible. So, from inside of me comes nothing but emptiness and life-energy without any underlying messages. On the outside it may look different, I don’t know and honestly, I try not to care. Every spectator has her or his own world to associate to, her own pair of glasses that give her ideas about what she sees and what she remembers when being confronted with my mountains of scratched, dripping paint. To me it’s just color and energy.
Describe your creative process.
Every creative process starts on the floor. On a large area of canvas, paper or wood, entranced I strive to act out myself on the surface. All tools, paints and solvents that could possibly be used are at hand in the activity area. When the process ends after an hour or two, I leave the place and let everything dry. Then a search for attraction begins. The subsequent over-paintings and adaptations are almost always in oil. The further process is sitting, looking at things, empathizing, listening to my inner voice, making decisions, remaining in the now ... each time different and unpredictable. I’ve developed this to be able to make discoveries, to be able to surprise myself.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
For me painting means survival, exploring my creativity is a way to keep my mental health. My paintings are internal images. They come from a level beyond time and space, beyond the personal ego, where complete stillness and total chaos coexist. They are like layers in the archetypal landscape which are deep inside of each person, regardless of culture or color.

Art has helped me to process my personal German history. My exhibition, “Unwanted lives” in 1996 was my final effort to deal with Nazi Germany, shown in different Swedish museums. After that performance, I felt liberated from the past. It was a catharsis, the end of my mourning process. Now my inspiration comes from my inner joy to be human and a free creator of my own world, without being drifted into sentimental sweetness.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
A great piece of art is always a personal statement. It has nothing to do with what it looks like but the commitment of the artist has to shine through. Then there is the aspect of communication of course. There has to be SOMETHING that is understandable, caches the eye otherwise we wouldn’t see it. For me personally, I want to be touched, I don’t have to understand, even better if I don’t and the question WHY, WHAT IS THIS? hits me strong…
What is the role of the artist today?
I don’t know what an artist’s role in society is and I find it hard to grasp that from perspective above. In different societies art has had very different roles depending on the spiritual level at any given time, the power structures, the culture, the dominating way of thinking and much more. I’m not a sociologist but for me, in our time, an artist’s actions are an important signal to his/her fellowmen to be brave, stand up for their opinion, be creative and look for the truth from a personal, subjective perspective.
Red Death - Oil on canvas 175 x 135 cm
Morning Oil - Oil on canvas 200 x 160 cm
Homage to my teachers - Oil on canvas 120 x 100 cm
Compact energy - Oil on canvas 120 x 100 cm
Grez - Oil on canvas 200 x 205 cm
Haus am Wörthsee - Oil on canvas 200 x 160 cm
Shadow Movement III - Oil on canvas 200 x 150 cm
Shadow Movement II - Oil on canvas 200 x 150 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jason Engelbart

Born 1960, Germany

Lives in: Hamburg, Germany

Describe your art in 3 words: Inspiring, touching, visionary

See More Work:  http://jasonengelbart.de | Singulart

FAIRY TALES TOLD BY THE WIND - Digital Neo Painting, Fine Art Print on Alu Dibond 175 x 130 cm

"My abstract-baroque works are based on my personal exploration of the diversity of our being. They are at the same time a reflection of the universal love that unites us all and they are an expression of my deep respect for our being, for the wonders of life and for every creature in this world. Against this background, my works are a homage to life, to our being."

What themes does your work involve?
The more our world is unsteady, the more the intentions for positive charging and balancing become stronger in me. It is not about painting the things in my works looking beautiful, but rather about using the tools at my disposal to trigger reflection and create a positive awareness of our daily togetherness. Here is the source of my sacral-abstract emotional artworks. In the creative process I feel deeply connected with my soul, my spirit… with God. My so-called digital neopaintings of the work cycle THE JOY OF BEING (2016 until today) are created in a purely intuitive creative process and are reflections of my personal feelings and experiences. My art is a testament to a cultivation of wholesome, human qualities, for positive change and development, which I state as my artistic vision.
Describe your creative process.
Using my characteristic digital painting technique, developed over the years, I abstract selected original works of the Baroque art epoch by superimposing picture levels, blurring, overpainting and re-composing them. In the process, my very own flowing structures and pictorial rhythms emerge, while the original colour composition remains largely untouched. In sum, colour and form transform into a single aesthetic-abstract event that is experienced on a purely emotional level and independent of time and space as a holy moment. Through this form of digitally painterly, an abstract re-staging of the original, I build a finely balanced bridge to contemporary art without disenchanting.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
The trigger for my abstract-baroque serie of works was a visit to the Würzburg Residenz in Germany in 2016. Overwhelmed by the opulent ceiling frescoes by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Antonio Giuseppe Bossi and Johannes Zick inside the Baroque castle, a deep desire arose in me to mirror this splendour of spirituality in the form of an abstract translation into the present. I closed my eyes while looking at the exuberant works on the walls and ceilings, except for a narrow slit of vision, until the figurativeness of the paintings dissolved into abstraction. Thus the foundation stone for my work cycle THE JOY OF BEING was laid.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
In my opinion, good art is timeless and at the same time enables reflection on the respective present moment. It touches on an emotional level, inspires the viewer and encourages him to pause and to contemplate.
What is the role of the artist today?
From my personal point of view, all forms of art are expressions of human existence. They are instruments for dealing with the past and at the same time have a dimension directed towards the future through visionary content, that can be guiding for the further development of society. This is why it is particularly important for an artist to use his/her possibilities of artistic expression in a respectful and responsible manner. In our multi-ethnic world, art therefore has a particularly high status. At best, it is an engagement to support integration and to highlight the positive elements of cultural diversity. In this sense, art is an invitation to a dialogue between the most diverse cultures and it offers the opportunity for self- reflection – for the artist and also for each recipient.
OVERTURE TO A FANTASTIC DREAM
- Digital Neo Painting, Fine Art Print on Alu Dibond 190 x 120 cm
GOLDEN GLOW OF CONFIDENCE - Digital Neo Painting, Fine Art Print on Alu Dibond 95 x 170 cm
FESTIVAL OF A MAGNIFICENT TRANSFORMATION - Digital Neo Painting, Fine Art Print on Alu Dibond 104 x 160 cm
EUPHORIA II - Digital Neo Painting, Fine Art Print on Alu Dibond 180 x 145 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Joejene C. Santos

Born 1970, Philippines

Lives in: Ottawa, Canada

Describe your art in 3 words: I Am Alive

See More Work:  www.joejeneartstudio.com | Instagram@joejenecsantos

Vivere - Acrylic and mixed media on canvas 60 x 48 in.

"Art is a discovery of who we are within and the greatest that we will be."

What themes does your work involve?
Self-discovery is the heart and soul of my creative practice. To me, knowing the beauty of who we are within is a liberating truth. This truth is the expression of life that I am alive, entitled to live life being true to oneself and enjoy it to the fullest passionately and courageously. Being in constant awe and wonder of the world around us, being one with all its creation, soaking in the beauty of the present moment, and being grateful with the gift of life, are what fuel my creativity.
Describe your creative process.
My creative process is very intuitive, consciously engaging and enjoying the moment of creation. I do a series of works that inspired me for which it provides the main structure for the pictorial composition but when I work, I love the idea that I do not worry about what it is about, where it is going, or how it is going to be put together. I just want to be in my present and feel alive. And yet, when I am in that moment, I know that within me, there is already an image, I just have to bring it out by feeling it.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Modern abstract masters and great contemporary artists do have some influences on me as an artist. Knowing that their personal experiences play a great deal in the development of their art, helps validate how I see my own art -- to be honest and true. Being consciously alive that I am here to live and enjoy life's beauty and wonder is what mostly inspires what I do. Knowing oneself is knowing the beauty and joy that the reason for what you do is worth sharing so others may be inspired in their own lives.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me, good art pleases your senses but great art moves you into another level of joy that makes you feel more alive.
What is the role of the artist today?
To be in the present, to be authentic, honest, and true.
Now I Know - Acrylic and mixed media on canvas 45 x 40 in.
It's You - Acrylic and mixed media on canvas 57 x 45 in.
An Angel Of The Slums - Acrylic and mixed media on canvas 60 x 48 in.
Freshen Up - Acrylic and mixed media on canvas 60 x 48 in.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Howard Harris

"Visual reality is an ever-shifting, highly individualized experience. In any given moment, what we see reflects both our inner state and a synthesis of outer qualities—light, color, movement, space. My exploration in dimensional photographic art represents an attempt to recreate the perceptual experience, with its dynamic nature and hidden complexities. In my patented process I use photographic constructions, a single often abstracted image is layered over itself on clear acrylic surfaces and superimposed on a subtle grid. The resulting visual phenomenon infuses the image with a sense of dimensionality and fluidity affected by such changes as the angle of viewing and light."

Ayers Rock - Sublimation Print on Aluminum with Acrylic overlay 36 x 30 in.

Howard Harris has long been fascinated by both visual perception and design. The Denver Colorado USA native earned a BFA from Kansas City Art Institute, MID (Masters Industrial Design) from Pratt Institute in New York studying with internationally renowned design theorist Rowena Reed Kostellow.

Harris has spent more than 35 years combining design and technology where he has won many prestigious professional awards. Now his creative energy has turned to his lifelong passion, photography. With an iconoclastic streak that had seen him consistently forging new directions in design, he was bound to approach the photographic image in an unconventional way as well.

In 2017 Harris was granted a United States Patent no: 9,753,295 titled Apparatus and Method of Manufacturer for a Layered Artwork proving the uniqueness and inventiveness of his photographic work. Since then his work has appeared in many books and publications such as The Great Masters of Contemporary Art, ARTtour International Artists of the Decade, Art Collectors Choice Japan, International Contemporary Masters, and Top 10 Contemporary Artists, to mention a few. He has also been awarded Artists for a Green Planet Artist of the Decade, International Prize Raffaello, International Prize Giulio Cesare, International Prize Leonardo Da Vinci, International Prize Caravaggio, Contemporary Art Curator Magazines Artist of the Future, and more.

Howard Harris serves as a Trustee of The Kansas City Art Institute has won the Who’s Who Worldwide Lifetime Achievement and the USA Small Businessperson of the Year. His work is shown internationally and represented by galleries in the United States, U.K., and Europe and appears in the South Korean Yukyung Art Museum.

No Monkeys - Sublimation Print on Aluminum with Acrylic overlay 36 x 30 in.
Puffer - Sublimation print on Aluminum 36 x 30 in.
Tuscany Landscape - Sublimation Print on Aluminum with Acrylic overlay 36 x 30 in.
Albers Unleashed - Sublimation Print on Aluminum 36 x 20 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Ophelia Redpath

Born 1965, Cambridge, UK

Lives in: Higham Ferrers, UK

Describe your art in 3 words: Surreal, narrative, colourful

See More Work:  www.opheliaredpath.com | www.instagram.com/opheliaredpath | www.facebook.com/opheliaredpath

British Domestic - Oil on canvas 30 x 40 cm

"My work is currently centring on the relationship between the wild world and the human world, with an emphasis on the sharp distinction between natural life forms with their motivations intentions, unique characteristics and colours, and the synthetic world devised by human beings, which is rapidly eclipsing and confusing our planet. I pose questions as to what is natural at this point in time."

What themes does your work involve?
My work revolves around the theme of what in our human civilisations our wild world can cope with, and what has deviated from the natural links which are life-sustaining . I try to empathise with the state of our flora and fauna, and the confusion and threat we as another species are inadvertently visiting on our fellow creatures, and on ourselves in the name of speed, convenience and progress. I am interested in contrasting our clever, grand but synthetic inventions with our real and natural humanity behind scenes, whether in our domestic settings or in our travels or in our thoughts. I like to be an advocate of anything that has a pulse, and, through paint, to portray its needs its place, its dilemmas and its character.
Describe your creative process.
Ideas seem as wild as any seed landing in the garden by chance. I need to be open to anything, be it a scrap of nonsense or of something profound. I find nuggets of them in political essays, in greetings cards, via eavesdropping, in humour, in sermons, on the radio. Visually I will be arrested by details - a child in the snow wearing a teal coat., an impassioned musician at Ronnie Scotts, or in the black and white stripes of a lemur against an indigo sky. Sometimes they appear in my head ready-made. This is rare but heady moment. The work itself is much more straightforward and involves being at the drawing board many hours a day and working by trial and error until I'm happy I've conveyed the original spirit of the idea. I draught out the design and then paint using oil on canvas.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am inspired by sincerity of any kind, be it in the wisdom in the eyes of a whale, the grief of a lost soul, the passion of a street artist, or the agony and humour of marital strife. I search for what I feel is genuine and not synthetic, and draw attention to it in my use of colour, contrast and composition. I am influenced by wildlife programmes and commentaries and approach subjects as though I were a wildlife photographer stumbling on a scene and witnessing creatures behaving unselfconsciously. Because of my wish to see people as one of many different, this extends to human beings. I have a need to question our relationship to the natural world. Artistically I am very influenced by the jewel-like work of the early Renaissance painters, Magritte and Samuel Palmer.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Art covers so many categories - visual art, music, literature, drama, dance. Each discipline works with a difference sense, and some with a combination of senses. I feel that good visual art needs to germinate in the eye of the artist and convey the original idea to the eye of the beholder. But in order to be great art, the idea needs to reach further, via the visual, to the intellect and soul of the beholder. The same applies to music arresting the ear through rhythm, harmony and melody. It is good music if it stimulates the ear, but great music if it links the depth of the composer to the depths of another human being.
What is the role of the artist today?
I guess there are as many roles for an artist as there are drives to create. My personal view is that Art has the function of keeping us out of mischief. By mischief, I mean laying too much emphasis on "progress" without consequence and without taking time to process life. I have an analogy of someone on a motorway, driving full-speed, to get somewhere quickly without fuss, but without involvement in the world. The object is achieved, but nothing else is noticed. Someone else may travel on a country road, without hurry, and arrive in the same place, having been involved in every bump and geographical reality. I see the role of the artist as someone who takes the country road, softens or sharpens each frame and each second and adds their experience to the collective digestion of life.
A & E - Oil on canvas 100 x 75 cm
Not in a Million Years - Oil on canvas 75 x 100 cm
Sorry - Oil on canvas 100 x 75 cm
Happy Families - Oil on canvas 65 x 85 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist