Rosario Bond

Born in: 1949, La Vega, Dominican Republic

Lives in: Miami, Florida, USA

Media: Painting, Sculpture, Installation, Mixed media, Collage

Describe your work in 3 words: Dramatic, gestural and emotional.

See More Work:  http://rosariobond.com

Happy Ashes I, 2016 -Acrylic-Flashe Paint on Canvas 72 x 72 in.

"In my work, the process is where the excitement is. I really need to be in the present, it is like a meditation, my work is completely intuitive and develops as I go along. It is also very physical, gestural and dynamic. I tend to work very fast at the beginning then I start slowing down, observing and editing. I like the element of surprise."

What themes does your work involve?
My work is difficult to pin down, I like to stimulate the viewer and myself so sometimes each painting can be quite different from one another.
Describe your creative process.
I like to start another work as soon as I finish the previous one, this gives me the energy to do something else and I would start with a different approach to the one I just finished.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Nature, geometric shapes, color, beauty, fashion, design, all these things inspire and influence me, and finally, I make art because it is the way that I express myself and I love making art, it is essential for me.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
"Good art catch your attention, either because is beautiful, or repulsive. But it engages you in one way or another, it challenges the viewer. A piece of art is great when it engages, connects and delight the viewer."
What is the role of the artist today?
The artist plays an important role in society today, specially now with all that is going on with a pandemic, political unrests, protests, these are very challenging times and through art one can send a message of their own political or emotional landscapes or just a message of beauty and peace that is much needed these days.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Shaun Haugen

Born in: 1986, USA

Lives in: Austin, TX, USA

Media: Painting, Sculpture, Digital Media, Watercolor, Collage, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: psyche, prehistoric, nature

See More Work:  www.shaunhaugen.com | Instagram: @shaun.epaints

I Am Dimension Flora, 2019 - Oil, spray paint, and neo megilp on canvas 76 x 53 x 1,5 in.

"My work is an experiment with the portrayal of exotic forms in nature. I depict not only exotic plant life, but sensual images and colors that relate to nature in its prehistoric state. My paintings are an imaginary environment where viewers can immerse themselves in an alternate condition that existed at the beginnings of humankind."

What themes does your work involve?
My research explores ancient variations on the natural environment. I source imagery of plant life that I find in various media, including botanical drawings, pictorial cyclopedias, medieval codices, and the Rajasthani masters. I investigate prehistoric conditions of human beings and the primitive life forms that existed within these periods. By looking back at the periods of the Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, and the Precambrian, I am able to develop my own imaginative and made-up plant and life forms. I use this research to help spark ideas for the jungle-like habitats that inform my paintings and other artworks.
Describe your creative process.
My art practice is a very intuitive process. I organically rely on spontaneity to build up the surface of the paintings. I then attempt to make a fluid composition by relying on a variety of brushwork and mark-making while utilizing a variety of mediums to create the structure of the paintings. Flatness and texture work congruently. Color is important to me as well. I use color to illicit connotations of a psychic experience and as a reflection in the wild of poisonous warning symbols. I often work on two paintings at a time with similar content; moving back and forth lets me bounce ideas off of each painting. I know my paintings are finished after I have sat with them for months and I feel like it is not necessary to make another move.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Artists who have influenced my practice include James Ensor, whose uninhibited use of texture has impacted the way I treat a flat surface with varying levels of raised paint. David Park’s juicy and luscious application of wet onto wet creates an incredible formulation of optical mixing that has been equally inspirational to me and how I perceive color. Lastly, Ann Hamilton has taught me the importance of play as a poetic element in art-making. Poetry and literature also inspire me to be creative and to further understand the human condition which is essential to my art. I make art because I have a constant flow of visions and creative ideas and the urge to apply them into reality. To form something out of nothing, this is the miracle of art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
If you think about the great artists that changed the history of art, many of these artists were rejected, including the father of modern art, Cezanne, and his facture, Van Gogh’s dreamy, vibrant, colorful paintings, Picasso’s first cubist painting “Les Demoiselles d'Avignon,” Warhol’s elimination of the hand, and so on. These artists I believe were truly authentic to themselves; their art is a source coming directly from within themselves. These artist and art that is great also considers the history of art. A great work of art simultaneously both bridges and breaks historical conventions. And, a great work of art, a true masterpiece is also, somehow, something we have never seen before.
What is the role of the artist today?
I make art because I have a creative and visual mind. I often see visions flash within my mind. When I try to replicate the vision I often fail to portray it perfectly, but the vision serves as a starting point. I enjoy the challenge of trying to bring my ideas into reality. I also enjoy being in my studio, which serves as a place of meditation and purpose. Art should always be about the artist and their internal expression. True art lives on because the artist is genuine to themselves; when this happens the great artist can touch on something visionary. Their need for expression can result in avant-garde art becoming the vanguard for the future.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Barbara Andino-Stevenson

Born in: 1941, San Francisco, USA

Lives in: Lagunitas, CA, USA

Media: Sculpture, Mixed media, Textile Arts, Ceramics

Describe your work in 3 words: Sensuous. Tactile. Evocative

See More Work:  Sweet Spirit Ceramics Center, housed at ArtWorks Downtown (1337 4th St., San Rafael, CA) - YouTube: Barbara Andino-Stevenson

Woman Spirit

"My rich internal life longs to find a form in which it can be seen, felt, and touched. A sculptural alchemist, I work with natural materials--clay, bark, and sometimes stones--enjoying a magical collaboration with these elements. Magic happens when I allow myself to enter the quiet flow where only clay, bark, my eyes, and the skill of my hands reveal the visible from the invisible."

What themes does your work involve?
The female form, death and rebirth, old and worn rather than new and perfect.
Describe your creative process.
A new piece emerges when my internal world is sufficiently stimulated and full. I begin by allowing the material to guide me. I watch and make conscious relationship choices in the forms being created. I know a piece is finished when no further changes need to occur. A series happens when some form that I've created intrigues me enough to find out more.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
What influences my work is Shamanic and Indigenous art and the forms and lines of Art Deco. I am inspired by the energy of the people in my world and the beauty and drama of the natural world that surrounds me. Why do I make art? Because I have to. I make art because without the creative process my life would be totally flat.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me, good art has to evoke an emotion, thought, or knowing that wasn't in me before. What makes a piece of art great is when the artist is passionate, has put in the time to hone their skills, and has a unique point of view. There's an "aha!" that the artist has experienced when completing their work and you can see and feel it.
What is the role of the artist today?
To create whatever you love.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Harry Goldstrom

Born in: 1948, USA

Lives in: Sequim, WA, USA

Media: Photography, Film/analog photography, Printmaking

Describe your work in 3 words: Traditional, empathetic, contemplative

See More Work:  harrygoldstrom.com

Colonnade - Silver Gelatin Print 16 x 20 in. (41 x 52cm)

"Photographically I believe there exists a special relationship between the landscape and music, particularly my favorites of Celtic, Classical, and Jazz. I first became aware of this during my college years as geology major when my interest in photography became serious."

“Which of my photographs is my favorite? The one I’m going to take tomorrow.”
- Imogen Cunningham

What themes does your work involve?
My artwork is about photographing the tranquility of nature and the fact that I revel in spending time at these places of grandeur. My photography represents not only how I envisioned a given scene but also my attempt to convey the emotion felt while making the photograph to others. Hopefully, some emotion will be evoked within and pondered by the viewer. Perhaps then the work will have served some purpose other than merely for my own enjoyment.
Describe your creative process.
My creative process begins prior to setting up even one piece of equipment.. When I come upon a scene to photograph, I visualize the finished photograph framed and hanging on a gallery wall.. The emotional excitement starts before I even make the exposure. Often my work is encompassed by larger themes. For example, my geologic background often surfaces in many of my landscape photographs. Those dynamic forces differ sharply from the tranquil display of forests. I rarely consider a photograph complete. Once the negative is developed, that portion is finished. However, the print making is an ongoing process which can last for years. I rarely print a given negative in exactly the same manner more than once. Subtle changes are often made to my photographs years later.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I enjoy the complete traditional film/paper/chemical print making process immensely. The exhilaration of watching a negative come out of the fixer or a print come up in a tray is as exciting to me today as it first was fifty years ago. Producing a photograph allows me to enjoy nature and its tranquility, and revisit those same emotions viewing the print years later as when I first experienced the scene.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
This is a question which certainly can be debated perpetually! I believe one of the most important criteria for good art is that is stands the test of time. The piece must also demonstrate good technique and knowledge of the medium. These three components are inextricably intertwined and absolutely essentially for any piece of art to be considered worthwhile. Good art must also elicit an emotional response from the viewer, resulting in contemplation regarding both the piece at hand and the larger aspects of art in general.
What is the role of the artist today?
I believe that art chose me, rather than vice-versa. Art plays a vital role in our global society. In addition to enhancing individuals’ lives and culture at large with one’s art, the teaching and preserving of art techniques is vital to helping the arts endure. Just as importantly I believe artists have a responsibility to support causes consistent with their beliefs. In addition to my artwork, I support wildlife organizations, animal rights organizations, and donate time to local non-kill animal shelters. Endorsing this obligation by any artist is one in which I believe most fervently.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Pia Kintrup

Born in: 1988, Germany

Lives in: Düsseldorf, Germany

Media: Photography, Sculpture, Installation

Describe your work in 3 words: conceptual, experimental, reflexive

See More Work:  https://www.piakintrup.com/

Matches 1.0, 2015/16 - Wooden panel, matches 40 x 27 cm

Pia Kintrup’s research investigates new media and materials, ranging from photography to sculpture. Transformational processes, value, emptiness and abundance, and photographic steps of transition are essential for her artwork. She has held countless exhibitions around Europe, and also a few in Asia, Canada, and the USA.

What themes does your work involve?
I´m highly interested in still life, materiality, and surface character. Transformational processes, value, emptiness and abundance, and photographic steps of transition are essential for my artwork. Besides my groundwork in photography, I´m working with installations and sculptures as well. In the three dimensional works, the essence is about the contradictory relation of man and object, surface, materiality, and artificial structures. My entire work is based on staging and imitation of reality.
Describe your creative process.
I'm used to working with a concept, but I'm experimenting a lot with material and sizes. I love to keep some space for exploration and accidents, which often leads to something completely new. In my opinion, especially in photography, every image has his one right presentation form and one perfect size. In my open series: the nonexistent areas are of particular interest, I always try to find the right style. The images of this series and their presentation quote the complexity and diversity of photography as a media.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
In these dark times, areas like Hong Kong are suffering under massive violent political repression, like many other countries as well. While at the same time, climate change shows us already an apocalyptic vision of the future of the earth. In these dark times, art is more important than ever before.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
There should be something universal about it, in a way that transfers a reflection of the world or the media itself. On the other hand, it´s crucial to make new ideas comprehensive and understandable in a broader sense. I also prefer if the artwork asks questions to the audience, instead of giving answers. For me, there must be space left for your thoughts.
What is the role of the artist today?
I don´t know actually what the role is. And I guess there isn´t only one role or position the artists have. It depends on the context, and there are so many aspects which rely on each other.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist