Jan Williams

Born in: 1958, New Zealand
Lives in: Not far from Brisbane, Australia.
Describe your art in three words: That's too hard!
Discipline: Sculpture
Education: Diploma of Fine Art. Brisbane College of Art. BFA, Hobart University
See More Work:  https://circle-arts.com/jan-williams/

Traveling to Asgard - Polyester and Fiberglass 44 x 49 x 35 cm

"The title 'Leaving for Asgard' needs to be explained. Asgard is the place pre-Christian Norwegians went to when they died. When my Norwegian mother Berit died 3 years ago and as she was not particularly religious, my family decided to send her there. She is clad in the poem my sister wrote for her farewell service, and her body travels laterally to the earthbound Asgard."

What themes does your work involve?
My theme is simply about life, all life, including death. My sculptures are about small bits of life, like people I know or those I may see when I'm out shopping or on the public transport, or they can be about the natural environment around my house in the bush.
Describe your creative process.
My initial inspiration sometimes come from looking and working from other artists ideas. The thought process is usually slow , developing and turning over in my head for quite a long time. Once I've begun modelling in plastercine, the process is still slow, changing, fine tuning, and sometimes restarting. Eventually I consider it complete and mostly it will still resemble the origional idea. The plastercine model will be plaster waste molded and a mix of polyester-fibreglass mixed with powdered iron is then painted into the mold parts. The molded parts are joined together and when cured the plaster mold is carefully broken away from the polyester figure. The cleaned up, figure will be soaked in salty water until a rust patina is established. It is then dried and sealed with a varnish.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I became an artist naturally because most of my family are artists or are otherwise connected to the visual arts. Art is naturally part of my life.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think good art speaks to me, great art speaks to everyone.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of todays artists don't concern me. I create my art for myself only.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Robert Pearson

Born in: 1952, New Zealand
Lives in: Prague, Czech Republic
Describe your art in three words: mapped exploratory decontruction
Discipline: Painting, Photography, Film/analog photography, Digital Media
See More Work:  http://robpearson.net - https://www.instagram.com/robpearson/

"I continue to try and find my unique visual voice. I am a photographer, digital explorer, and film Production designer. I have won an Emmy, D&AD wooden pencils, Cyclpe design awards and many other design and Photograghy awards."

What themes does your work involve?
New Topographics, deconstruction.
Describe your creative process.
Every piece is different, the art in life finds me, not vice versa. but I am always looking for it.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Functionalism, Bauhaus, Cubism.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Something unique and personal that is different and belongs to one person.
What is the role of the artist today?
Same as always, to describe the indescribable. to highlight the unique.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Lode Coen

Born in: 1952, Antwerp, Belgium
Lives in: Mechelen, Belgium
Describe your art in three words: elegant surrealist intriguing
Discipline: Painting, Digital Media, Illustration, Mixed media
Education: MFA*(equivalent) National Higher Institute of Fine Arts, 1979, Antwerp
BFA, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, 1976, Maxima Cum Laude, Antwerp.
Pedagogical Diploma, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, 1976, Magna Cum Laude, Antwerp.
See More Work:  https://lodecoen-renaissance.tumblr.com

"I can't afford to buy my own Leonardo da Vinci or Botticelli, so I create my own masterpiece. My main love has been the art of the Renaissance since I was a student at the Royal Academy. After a long career in Silicon Valley & Hollywood as an expert in CGI, special FX, I now use a mix of digital and analogue tools to create my art. I create what I like, eclectic art with hidden meaning."

What themes does your work involve?
I am interested in the Renaissance, Classicism and Surrealism, with a Postmodern twist. I am not afraid of kitsch. We live a a fake world anyway, the matrix. There is also a strong influence of music, sound and vision. Also, Asian art, through my study of Chinese, especially calligraphy, but also Chinese renaissance like the art of Giuseppe Castiglione. Japanese art and printmaking. I am also interested in art as a therapy. Other themes include flowers. Perhaps my main theme is ‘light'.
Describe your creative process.
I start messing around, sometimes from an idea or a pencil sketch, sometimes no idea at all. In the process of adding or subtracting to it, I'm open to the unexpected, serendipity and wonder. On occasion, I throw most in the trash, but start again from tabula rasa or start anew from a small left over part. Each time I create a work of art I run through my extended knowledge of art history. So my art is de facto eclectic. I am also a perfectionist, but love to improvise. Many contrarian modi operandi in one artist.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Foremost inspired by nature and all aspects of light. Also the mythical, mystical and occult. I love the ornamental, like in art nouveau, art deco, 60s psychedelic art, pop art, pre-raphaelites, islamic art and calligraphy. I make art because I started as a 2-year old drawing with a stick in the sand, and since then haven't stopped creating. I don't pursue fame and fortune--those things are all transitory and fade away as quickly as they come--however, I do like my art being appreciated and valued. The art that I share with the world is only a fraction of the 1000s I have created. Will my legacy remain? After I die, I (probably) won't know, so we better enjoy it now.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Art that makes me look at reality with different eyes. Art that makes me joyful. Most often, it is NOT the art that follows the contemporary canon, or the art critics, galleries, or speculators.
What is the role of the artist today?
Now that I am financially independent and I have all the time in the world, I just create for myself and the circle of people that like it. In general the role of the artist is to open doors and windows to make people look at the world from different perspectives. Though some people want to force an agenda on what art should be, either political, philosophical, or social, I do not go along with that. I've always been a contrarian in that sense. Or an ‘Einzelgänger

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Amy Schleif

Born in: 1976, United States
Lives in: Moruya Heads, Australia
Describe your art in three words: Beautifully uncomfortable
Discipline: Glass Art
Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts - University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Master of Art Visual Art - Glass Workshop - Australian National University
See More Work:  https://southheadstudio.wixsite.com/amy-ellen-schleif-

Seeing No. 50 - Hand engraved glass, Mirror & Custom Frame - 100 x 100 x 10cm

"I am interested in creating spaces that explore the constant change of our perception depending on our emotional states and physical perspectives. I explore this through the use of colour, reflection, shadow and time. As the viewer’s physical perspective changes, the reflections work to hide areas and light penetrates to expose new colours and shadows, resulting in a change in perception."

What themes does your work involve?

Broadly my work involves how we perceive the world around us and the filters that influence that perception. Recently I have focused on the ideas of recovery and reflection in the context of our perception. This particular work attempts to create a circumstance for the viewer to become aware that we can put our daily life distractions in front of seeing our reality clearly. Often, seeing this reality clearly is fleeting, because of those daily distractions. So, sometimes, we have the opportunity to see ourselves and then it is gone.

Describe your creative process.
My creative process begins with looking at my surroundings and my sketch book. I am forever looking at the landscape, how the mountains intersect one another to the horizon and how the ocean seems to reflect a similar line quality. In my sketch book I draw many contour lines in differing compositions. These compositions are then edited down to a few. I make decisions about which lines are on the front of the glass and which are on the back, and delineate where the glass will stay clean and clear. Then I begin to draw all the lines that fill the shapes with a diamond scribe. Decisions about line direction happen as the work evolves. I think about how I want the light to catch at just a specific point to underpin the ideas of distraction and clear reality.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Over the years I have developed a habit of watching peoples behaviour. I look at how two people often have completely different perceptions of an event or circumstance, different perspectives. I also look at what we use as distractions to avoid confronting and taking responsibility for our own behaviour. I try to create works that encourage us to look at ourselves and the impact our behaviour has on others. Hoping to create awareness. I also look at my surrounding landscape of mountains, rivers, beach and ocean, this is what inspires the line quality I seek. I use the beautiful line quality and the sparkle of the glass to draw the viewer in, to then confront them with a fleeting glimpse of themselves. I make art because I have to, like I have to breathe. It is not a choice for me.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is compelling and challenging. I respond to works that make me feel a bit uncomfortable and challenge me. Works that are incessant, that don't allow reprieve, that demand attention. It takes guts to really look at art, really look at it. It is a window into how another human being thinks, great art give us this opportunity. Great art gives us viewers questions to ask and perhaps answer.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist, because I can't be anything else. It is the core of who I am as a person. I see the role of the artist in contemporary society as almost a truth Sayer. Someone asking meaningful questions, making society see truth, encouraging the movement forward and to be a bit of a contrarian.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Mauro Martin

Born in: 1954, Italy
Lives in: Chivasso, Piedmont, Italy
Describe your art in three words: ...less is more...
Discipline: Painting, Photography, Sculpture
See More Work:  https://www.mauromartin.it/

"In the artistic field I was born as a painter, developing various techniques and expressive research and I landed in the use of the photographic medium, I use both in my aesthetic research."

What themes does your work involve?

Being able to be worthy of re -proposing the splendor of the Florentine Renaissance in a current key.

Describe your creative process.
I listen to what my sensitivity (heart/mind) suggests me, based on this "listening" I choose how and what to represent.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
... is a continuous "becoming" both technical and on a philosophical level. I deal with painting, photography and video art ... I choose the most suitable technique according to the situation I intend to represent. In fact, I use painting and photography to reveal the depths of the human soul and the metaphysical essence of objects and feelings, always keeping in mind the minimalist assumption "Less is more”.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Art should help us live better and could be a point of reference, perhaps modest, to raise us from squalor and daily pressure. A "piece of art great" should achieve this goal.
What is the role of the artist today?
The moment we are experiencing is truly disconcerting, the littleness of different subjects emerges from this situation. This reflection leads me to be even more rigorous in the search for absolute technical-formal perfection and at the same time pushes me to the search for the eternal beauty, in a neoplatonic key ... to distance itself from a situation that is sometimes difficult to manage ...

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jon Bøe Paulsen

Born in: 1958, Oslo, Norway
Lives in: Oslo, Norway
Describe your art in three words: Hard hitting fist!
Discipline: Painting, Watercolor, Drawing, Printmaking
Education: 1977 Eksamen Artium, Oslo, NO (College degree)
1979 School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA, USA
1980-1984 Norwegian State Art Academy, Oslo, NO
See More Work:  https://www.artrenewal.org/artists/jon-be-paulsen/7440

Narrow Escape - Étroit S'échapper: Oil on canvas 86 x 115 cm

"A clair obscure painter who tries to enter a world where photography cannot follow."

What themes does your work involve?

Pictures speak louder than words, they say, and the centerpiece of my art style is probably light in the dark. Being a painter suits me perfectly since I like to be my own master. Art must move into a world where photography cannot follow. Hell cannot be photographed, only fixed to a canvas through an artist's temperament.

Describe your creative process.
I can sometimes work with a theme. This year I am working on a frieze about violence against women and one of the painting is presented in this final. Last year I concentrated on historical paintings about Jesus' suffering, death and resurrection, although I would not characterize myself as a religious person.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
The subconscious works more than you think, and it refines the themes and motifs, but it can take time. Personally, I don't feel that the role of art necessarily needs to be topical. Of course, I am also influenced by the troubled world we live in with war in Europe and the Middle East, among others, but I try to work in long lines. If one day I were to run out of ideas I would stop painting.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is characterized by flaws and temperament. It matters little even if it appears helpless and unable to communicate if the audience nevertheless perceives a burning commitment. Art is at its best when the work appears with a clear message. The person who created the work must not accept many reactions from the public if they are the result of a misunderstanding. An indisputable message. From the artist. Then it's art.
What is the role of the artist today?
I felt as a child that I might have a talent for drawing and in a small country like Norway it was possible to become a visual artist. Amateur theater gave me a lot, but the actor is dependent on other people's decisions in order to work. Film director would be difficult since the language community was too tiny. A visual artist can more easily follow the landscape from an economic point of view and early on I had bad experiences of being dependent on the favors of powerful people. A sculpture or a painting is done by one person, not a group and I have always been impressed by that.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Christy Chor

Born in: Hong Kong
Lives in: Ontario, Canada
Describe your art in three words: Storytelling, One-of-a-kind, Original
Discipline: Ceramics
Education: Honours Bachelor of Craft and Design (Ceramics) from Sheridan College, Canada
Hong Kong Polytechnics, Design
See More Work:  https://www.christychor.com

Pulse of Nature - Cone 6 Stoneware, Handbuilt, Mixed media, 36 x 10 x 14.5 in.

Christy Chor is a nature lover, ceramic artist, and storyteller. Nature inspires her: the majesty of the landscape, the orchestra of wildlife, life experiences, and the natural flow of energy. She believes Mother Nature has her charismatic beauty, poetic and chaotic moments, and resilience. She brings natural harmony to humankind yet responds with rage to human-made interruption and imbalance.

What themes does your work involve?

Nature is not just a source of inspiration for me; it's a part of my being. I choose sculptural ceramics to express my voice in art and share my real-life experiences. All my works are created in series, and the themes are Nature in poetic and chaotic moments. My works have their unique DNA, and the concepts are narrative-driven. All pieces have their specific styles of individuality and consistency. They are developed in stages, and the themes are about BACK TO NATURE; all the works are story-telling, like chapters with never-ending stories.

Describe your creative process.
Through years of design experience, pottery practicing, and further professional studies at Sheridan College Canada specializing in Art & Craft (Ceramics), I formulated my methodology for creative processes with the following stages: 1. Observation + Curiosity + Source of inspirations 2. Research + Concept Development in series + Explorations of materials and techniques 3. Making/Glazing/Firing + Documentation of processes + Communication with Creative photography and reels. 4. Review + re-discovery 5. Evaluation and goal setting for the next series Visionary and problem-solving attitudes are crucial to success from the start to the completion of the work series.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I enjoy experimenting and exploring new adventures in life and work. My curiosity and problem-solving attitude most influence my creative approach and style. The discoveries from trials and errors reward me with invaluable learning experiences and pleasant surprises. My appreciation of nature and treasure of moments inspire me with boundless resources. Happening in nature today, poetic and chaotic moments, energy flow, and bird observation stimulate my curiosity and imagination. ART connects people from different backgrounds and breaks the barriers of languages and cultures. Through art, I can share my beliefs and have my voice heard. Art is also a kind of therapy. That is my primary purpose for making art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Each good work of art has its soul embedded in it. If the Art speaks to the audience, awakens them with long-lost excitement and intriguing imagination, and recalls their great memories of life, it serves its true purpose; it is a fantastic work of art. Feel and relevance are the strong stimuli for awakening the audience’s appreciation of art. If a piece of Art stimulates the audience’s nerves and emotions, shares the vision, and touches the heart with feelings, it is an influential art. When the audience responds and resonates, it makes the art superb.
What is the role of the artist today?
As an artist, I can share my beliefs and hear my voice through ART. It is gratifying to have the audience or art lovers resonate with the message of my work. I chose to be an artist rather than work in commercial design industry now. Each artist possesses unique talents and skills. We should harness our work to stand out and create a harmonious echo, fostering a sense of connection. The artist's role today is to connect and unite people of different levels and break cultural and political barriers for a better world through positive communication in art. Our art world needs different but sincere voices to be heard. We should remain original and assertive, appreciate the other’s work, be inspired, and inspire others to seek their long-lost sense of feeling and imagination.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Barbara D’Angelo Månsson

Born in: Italy
Lives in: Sweden
Describe your art in three words: Experimental, exploratory, instinctive
Discipline: Painting, Mixed media
See More Work:  https://www.brush.bio/bdm

In the Middle of My Mind - Acrylic, oil pastels, charcoal, and sand on canvas 80 x 100 cm

"At the heart of my artistic endeavor lies a profound fascination with human nature and its pervasive influence on the world we inhabit. Through my work, I seek to unravel the complexities of human experience, delving into the depths of emotions and connections that shape our reality."

What themes does your work involve?

Themes that my art explores included the human nature, its impact on the world and its Interconnectedness.
My art delves into the complexities of human nature, capturing the essence of emotions, experiences, and relationships. It seeks to unravel the intricacies of the human experience and the interplay between individuality and the collective human landscape. My work reflects on how human nature influences and shapes the world we inhabit. By exploring the impact of human actions, emotions, and connections on the surrounding environment, my art contemplates the broader implications of our presence in the world.

Describe your creative process.
My approach to painting is akin to embarking on a journey: Rather than adhering to a predetermined plan for the final piece, I embrace fluidity and spontaneity, allowing ideas to evolve organically as I work. Often commencing with the selection of a color that resonates with me in the moment, I initiate the process by creating initial marks on canvas. These initial gestures mark the inception of an introspective voyage, wherein I delve into a realm of exploration, seeking harmonious combinations of shapes and colors that authentically convey my innermost emotions and thoughts.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My art is influenced by personal introspection, emotional expression, and a spirit of exploration. I create art to delve into my inner self, express emotions visually, and explore new ideas. Through my work, i seek authenticity and connections with others by conveying deep emotions and universal truths.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Each good work of art has its soul embedded in it. If the Art speaks to the audience, awakens them with long-lost excitement and intriguing imagination, and recalls their great memories of life, it serves its true purpose; it is a fantastic work of art. Feel and relevance are the strong stimuli for awakening the audience’s appreciation of art. If a piece of Art stimulates the audience’s nerves and emotions, shares the vision, and touches the heart with feelings, it is an influential art. When the audience responds and resonates, it makes the art superb.
What is the role of the artist today?
As an artist, I can share my beliefs and hear my voice through ART. It is gratifying to have the audience or art lovers resonate with the message of my work. I chose to be an artist rather than work in commercial design industry now, Each artist possesses unique talents and skills. We should harness our work to stand out and create a harmonious echo, fostering a sense of connection. The artist's role today is to connect and unite people of different levels and break cultural and political barriers for a better world through positive communication in art. Our art world needs different but sincere voices to be heard. We should remain original and assertive, appreciate the other’s work, be inspired, and inspire others to seek their long-lost sense of feeling and imagination.
Walking in the City at Night - Acrylic on canvas 120 x 100 cm
Viaggi in Superficie - Acrylic, oil pastels, and charcoal on canvas 80 x 100 cm
Silenzi Notturni - Acrylic, oil pastels, charcoal, and sand on canvas 120 x 100 cm
In Search for a Beautiful Memory - Acrylic, oil pastels, and charcoal on canvas 100 x 80 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Alan Todd

Born in: 1948, UK
Lives in: Australia
Describe your art in three words: Exploratory, ever-evolving, sensory=based
Discipline: Painting, Sculpture, Installation, Mixed media, Drawing
Education: Bachelor of Fine Art, Byam Shaw London 1970
See More Work:  alantoddvisualartist.com

Hira Hira - Acrylic on canvas 152 x 152 cm

"'Hira Hira' means falling leaves and is part of a series of works entitled 'Conversations With My Father.' The title is ironic in that the conversations never took place and he never got to see the work."

What themes does your work involve?

Essentially every piece of work is a self portrait in the sense that my response to the world around me is determined by specific experiences. The individual and society is the driving force behind all of my dance productions while the recognisable drawn gesture that pervades my use of graphic materials derives from the origins of learning to write. as both a means of communication and for its asemic properties..

Describe your creative process.
Everything begins with drawing, whether it is the realisation of forms leading to sculpture, marks made on a surface or as with my sculptures based upon a dancer, observation and transcription of movement in space. However, the possibilities of the medium, stored memory and the recombining of those memories become the driving force for any piece of work as it assumes an identity. The process is fluid in the sense that the end result is not preplanned as it is with Design but has to be allowed to evolve. I work in series [often to my own detriment when it comes to working space and storage] with each work in the sequence drawing upon the previous one. These is seldom a stand alone piece.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am very conscious of the path taken by modern and post modern artists to open up both what art can be and the materials than can be employed. In that light, every artist of the last century has played a part in influencing me. Increasingly though it is the conceptual and installationist artists who are shaping my creative direction as I search for a synthesis of approach and material that explores my connection to the world.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
There is always some suggestion that good/great art is art that appeals to the widest audience, gets published endlessly, survives its era or becomes the progenitor of a different mode of expression. but all of those definitions are peripheral. The artist works alone with each piece part of a continuum of expression. If the work connects to one person or becomes iconic, that is a bonus because only the artist knows whether an individual piece of work is 'good' and the measure of 'great' is a determination made by others who may well have a quite different agenda.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist in society is less determined today than it has ever been. other than to feed an avaricious art market which sees value only in investment terms. There are no more art movements and the mobility of artists renders national identity as null and void. More than ever, the artist is an individual, serving individual needs, and while some choose to make social or political statements through their work, it is the right to individual expression that drives most artists. even when state institutions and galleries as a means of artistic exposure seek to categorise and pigeonhole artists.
Conversation with my Father - Acrylic on canvas 152 x 152 cm
Incident on Coro 2 - Acrylic on canvas 152 x 152 cm
Somnambulant in N - Acrylic on canvas 152 x 152 cm
Don't Spiegel me of Gluttony - Acrylic on canvas 152 x 152 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Eduardo Blanco

Born in: 1974 León, Spain
Lives in: Mallorca, Spain
Describe your art in three words: Expressive, Vibrant, Emotional.
Discipline: Painting, Mixed media
See More Work:  https://www.eduardoblancoart.com/

Old memories - Oil, iron oxide, and copper on canvas on stretcher frame. 130 x 97 cm

"In my art, every stroke narrates a story, woven from learning and experience. Contemporary and daring, my work challenges norms, embracing the present with alla prima technique and layered meanings. Realism meets expressionism, while abstraction invites exploration. Art is my journey, each brushstroke a step into the unknown. Through careful reflection and instinctive execution, I infuse vitality."

What themes does your work involve?
In my art, I navigate a vast range of subjects, but always return to portraiture as my true north. Each human face, with its stories and emotions, fascinates me. While landscapes enchant with nature's beauty, portraits offer a unique depth, a direct link to humanity's essence. Horses, symbols of nobility and power, are a recurring motif. Capturing their elegance in every stroke is a constant challenge. And through commissions, I explore diverse themes, from intimate portraits to historical events, meeting the desires of collectors and buyers alike.
Describe your creative process.
In my creative process, it all begins with finding a motive that grabs me, something that inspires me deeply. Once found, I reflect on how to capture it, which involves making crucial decisions. From there, each piece takes its own path. Sometimes, I start with acrylic layers before transitioning to oil; other times, I incorporate previous textures with the canvas or board primer. In the last year, I have experimented with iron oxides, copper, or brass. Occasionally, I have also worked with grisailles. albeit not conventionally. Every artwork represents a new universe to explore, filled with possibilities and paths to discover.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Among my influences, I could mention many contemporary artists like Lita Cabellut, Costa Dvorezky, Luis Azón or Christian Hook, as well as classical artists such as Sorolla, Zorn, or Freud. Almost every day, I discover artists or artworks that captivate and motivate me. Inspiration can also come from many other places, like a sunset, a play of light, people in a park... I paint because it's already a part of me, because I love it and because I've found in art an eternal path of learning and emotion. The creative drive and curiosity lead me to explore and remain open to any source of inspiration, which can come from the most unexpected places. One just needs to keep their eyes and curiosity wide open.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
The notion of what makes a piece good is subjective. Ultimately, it's about evoking emotion, which varies from person to person. Commercial factors come into play too—market value, potential appreciation. Collectors often aim to profit from their investment, but I can't concern myself with those matters. As an artist, I focus on the emotional aspect. I paint what catches my attention, when I want to convey something, when something moves me. If my pieces resonate with an audience, great! I paint to satisfy myself first, with the hope of connecting with some people.
What is the role of the artist today?
It varies... not all artists are the same. Some are deeply involved in social or political issues, believing it's their duty to convey advocacy messages. Others, myself included, are more interested in beauty, crafting evocative imagery, or establishing internal connections through portraiture. All these roles are valid and necessary. Diversity in art, across all its facets, enriches us.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist