Irene Koroluk

Born in: 1965, Melbourne, Australia
Lives in: Taroona, Tasmania
Describe your art in three words: Intricate, layered, tactile
Education: Master of Environmental Studies (University of Tasmania),  Bachelor of Fine Arts (University of Tasmania)
See More Work: https://www.irenekoroluk.com/

Out There - Bleach painting, free motion machine stitching, fabric, batting, thread, shellac ink, 90 x 90 cm

“My artistic practice is rooted in my profound connections with the natural environment. My work seeks to encapsulate and unveil the sense of wonderment, diversity and beauty inherent in wild and remnant habitats. Extremely drawn to fragile and threatened landscapes, I am committed to imparting the value and significance of appreciating and safeguarding the remaining habitats of importance."

What themes does your work involve?
Mostly Australian native landscape diversity, beauty and fragility.
Describe your creative process.
Before commencing any work, I attach canvas or fabric to an underneath layer of bag batting using free motion stitching in a repeated pattern. This repetition allows me to get into the right creative head space. Once complete, my first starting point is always a tree or a plant. From there I add more and more foliage, working from foreground to background. My work is improvisational, with no outlines or sketches. As I often work blind due to scrunching up my work to fit it in between the sewing machine arm and bed, a lot of time is taken balancing and rebalancing the design. I know a work is finished when I stop wanting to add or unpick content.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My work is influenced by the materials and the facilities I have available on hand when I start a piece. Upholstery thread colours, and bag batting I require are not always available, so I need to work within those confines. Content wise, my work is inspired and influenced by my encounters with the natural world, places I explore and travel to. My work is also informed by my environmental background, interest in conservation and plant diversity, and by my place of residence which borders a ravine with towering eucalypts and native species. I make art because I get a real buzz and validation from selling my work, getting into art prizes and being published. It is also about healing and accomplishment. I've also always had an inner compulsion to scribble.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art to me is work that makes me go 'wow'. It often uses techniques or materials I have not come across, or made by someone whose mastery of technique and workmanship is out of the ordinary. It is work that makes me want to ask questions including how on earth did they do that? It is work that I want to marvel at, spend time with, and stirs my soul. Good art to me is often unique with unusual or difficult content. Good art can evoke emotions of discomfort, happiness, and admiration of beauty. Great art is art that you see and never forget, it is art that speaks to you. Louise Bourgeois's spiders, William Rickett’s Aboriginal sculptures, Rew Hanks lino cuts to name a few. It is work on your bucket list that you want to see before you die; and when you see it, it makes you more whole.
What is the role of the artist today?
Being an artist allows me to share my love of the natural world and hopefully inspire people to go out and be enriched by it. It allows me to continually learn and improve, expand my imagination and keep my brain healthy. Art chose me through luck, being able to draw, and being in the right places at the right times. Art in contemporary society should have many roles including: community engagement and inclusion through community-based art; cultural, aesthetic and individual enrichment; and social and political education and activism.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Wen Redmond

Born in:1950'2/NJ
Lives in: Strafford, NH
Describe your art in three words: sensitive experimental photography
Education:BA Mansfield State University
See More Work:  https://www.wenredmond.com/

“My works centers around bringing the outside in. Bringing my sense of delight and appreciation of the natural world to viewers through my art.”

What themes does your work involve?
I continue to investigate the digital world but also imaginative presentations that add to the pioneering exploration of my media and give my work edge. Each work is unique and created individually.
Describe your creative process.
I experiment, looking for new and inventive ways to take my work to the next level, printing on unique or unconventional media, displayed in various ways. Each presentation adds to the pioneering innovations and give my work edge. My techniques can be further investigated in my books- Digital Fiber Art and Other Mixed Media Masterpieces, and my new book, Explorations with Collage! Merging Photographs, Paper & Fiber (https://schifferbooks.com/products/explorations-with-collage?_pos=1&_sid=4f6fd3f09&_ss=r) and an online workshop with Fibre Arts Take Two in August (https://www.fibreartstaketwo.com/courses/wenredmond/?fbclid=IwAR39opvUL8DV3GjYcJbxIIZlWF9xdLxQwYT-yImHR4sg_G15cMvZDIBz_Yo ).
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My works centers around bringing the outside in. Bringing my sense of delight and appreciation of the natural world to viewers through my art. Manipulating photographs and creating digital images is a huge part of my artistic motivation. I experiment, looking for new and inventive ways to take my work to the next level, printing on unique or unconventional media, displayed in various ways. Each presentation adds to the pioneering innovations and give my work edge. Every work generates an artistic tension, followed by the excitement of the actual creation of the work. A dialogue is started, and the work becomes real.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Art comes from awarness. Making my art allows me to tap into levels of perception, becoming more aware, more conscious, & more grateful. I’ve loved photography my entire life. This brings a tender sensitivity to one’s surroundings. An eye. Sometimes, I look with intention, focusing on everything with the possibility of creating a composition. And sometimes it just happens. A quick glance becomes the image for a future work. These moments are my well, my source. I bring that energy into my art making, to communicate the positive. Creation gives me ideas. My passion is to put them into art.
What is the role of the artist today?
As yeast to leaven the culture.

Wen's work has traveled the US, UK, Europe, Japan, and Australia, and is part of the permanent collections of Marbaum, San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, CA, Maria V. Howard Arts Center, Rocky Mount, NC, Visions, CA, New England Quilt Museum, and private collections.
She has been featured in numerous magazines and books including her own published books, Digital Fiber Art and Mixed Media Masterpiece and new book with Schiffer Publishing - Explorations with Collage- Merging Photographs, Paper and Fiber.
She currently splits her time between North Carolina and New Hampshire.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Noémie L. Côté

Born in: 1980, Canada
Lives in: Ottawa, Canada
Describe your art in three words: Happy textured landscapes
Education: Undergraduate in Ceramics at Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
See More Work: https://noemielcote.com/

"Looking at my work you are at once hit by the sugar-pop of colour that reimagines the landscapes I bring to life on canvas. It’s hard not to be swept along in the bounce of my thick textured paint strokes and moved by the sheer joy that emanates from the rich oil colours. I specialize in vibrant landscapes that captures the essence of a scene, and leaves the observer uplifted."

What themes does your work involve?
I paint landscapes to capture the essence of being in nature—those moments when the sun shimmers off the water, the warmth of a sunset, or the wind gently rocking the trees
Describe your creative process.
I immerse myself in nature as much as possible, capturing moments through photography. Recalling the emotions, I sketch, ink, and paint using thick, buttery oils. The pre-mixed oil paints remain un-muddled, applied with bold strokes resembling butter icing. I paint without layering, preserving the texture and tiny ridges left by the brush. Strokes are applied side by side, leaving space for the underpaint to shine through, imparting a sense of underlying light to the artwork. The vibrant colours are refreshing and never appear overworked or overly detailed, encouraging viewers to engage their imagination rather than expecting a realistic reproduction. I often work in small series, exploring a location or scene across various canvas sizes and colour variations.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
The biggest influence on my work is nature. Having lived on different continents and traveled extensively, I've come to appreciate the beauty and uniqueness of each region. Nature evokes an immense feeling of peace and inner joy that I aim to capture in my paintings. My artistic style has been influenced by the Canadian Group of Seven and Impressionist founders such as Claude Monet. I create art because of a strong inner need to express myself creatively. Art is my self-expression, and without it, I feel incomplete. It's my way of sharing joy and uplifting others.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Today's art acts as a catalyst for change, with artists creatively expressing themselves and serving various purposes, such as reflecting societal values, contributing to cultural preservation, providing entertainment, and adding beauty to spaces. Personally, as a young child, creating art served as a form of communication and therapy. Art opens your mind and can elevate your spirit.
What is the role of the artist today?
One of the most important roles of the artist is to tell stories, documenting the events and memories of today in a lasting and meaningful way through art. I see an artist’s greatest purpose as being able to inspire others, passing the torch to the next generations the way my mentors passed it on to me.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist