CR Rousseau

"Color is my energetic exchange with the world. I work with color and light, following where the energy takes me; sometimes that's a vibrant abstract, other times it's an impressionistic landscape or something else entirely. My work isn't about canvas, paint, style nor technique, it's about the adventurous pursuit of expression, meaning, connection to environment, each other and ourselves."

Northern - Oil on canvas 48 x 36 in.

Often creating scenes of nature through the lens of a happy traveler, Caroline Rousseau brings forward a dreamlike path of play and discovery. Rousseau explores styles and challenges previous approaches with oils, acrylics, water color, ink, photography, print, as well as "the kitchen sink".

Informally referred to as the Eighth of "The Group of Seven" Rousseau was privileged to be thought of as an American cousin to such a distinctive style. Elegantly breaking away from traditional landscapes, Rousseau embraces a personalized sense of the natural world with twists of imbued color wrapped into abstract forms, like a memory of a dream.

Rousseau exhibits primarily in Seattle and Edmonds, Washington, as well as in Carmel-by-the-Sea, Santa Barbara and Sausalito, California. Her work can be found in private collections internationally.

Coastal Abstract - Oil on canvas 30 x 30 in.
China Cove - Triptych, Oil on canvas Ea. 12 x 12 in. each
Cruising Scenic - Oil on canvas 36 x 48 in.
Lavender Sky - Oil on canvas 16 x 16 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Mary Chaplin

My secret garden - Acrylic on canvas 150 x 120 cm

Professional French artist, Mary Chaplin was born in Picardy, and now lives and works in Cany-Barville, Normandy. From a figurative beginning, an art form to which she remains faithful, Mary Chaplin has become a multidisciplinary artist who expresses herself in different fields all having a connection with light; the essence of her work.

She came to abstraction 17 years ago when she witnessed the "sacred light" in a chapel she was visiting; she was deeply touched and inspired by the beauty of the reflections coming through the stained glass windows, this abstract work she calls her "reflections", or in French, "meditations".

After this synchronistic experience, Mary's desire to transmit the ephemeral character of light was reinforced. Accordingly, her work on Nature was also transformed. The artist started a series called ‘Etats d’Ame Nature’ through which she expresses her deep love for the universe of the garden. The expression of colour and movement. Light is predominant for her to express the wind, the sun, the scents and essential life of the garden. Figurative representation is no longer essential for Mary Chaplin. Nevertheless, what is fundamental for her is that the work be a sensory immersion gateway, allowing the viewer to become spiritually in communication. May he feel the positive energy of an in-temporal summer garden bathed in light and be part of this timeless beauty. The garden is the artist's favorite place to live mindfulness meditation experiences. Experience that extends into the act of creating and that it transmits in the created work.

Mary Chaplin's work is represented by galleries throughout different countries, including France, Belgium, the USA and England.

 

 

Select Exhibitions

2021- Retrospective, Museum of St Riquier organized by the Department of Somme France

2019 – Artfair AAF New York City with Signet Art Contemporary Chelsea London UK

2018 - Affordable Art Fair London Battersea with Wychwood Art Gallery UK

2017-20 - Huis Huis Gallery Ghent Belgium

2016- Exhibition Gallery Saphira & Ventura NY & Artitude, Paris

2011 - Gallery Manna Kunsthuis Bruges, Belgium

July in Normandy - Acrylic on canvas 120 x 150 cm
September floral - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 100 cm
Secret whispering of the garden - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 100 cm
Carefree childhood - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 120 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Gaya Lastovjak

Born in: 1987, Mażikiai, Lithuania
Lives in: Cracow, Poland
Media: Mixed media, 3D painting
Describe your art in three words: Human, emotions, symbolism
See More Work:  https://gayalast-art.tumblr.com/

Influences

Contemporary figurative artist creating three-dimensional paintings with her own technique using paper-mache, canvas and oil paint. Her works reveal a sculptural vision of form, they surprise with their diversity in terms of structure and message, focusing on showing the aspect of human existence.

Reconciliation
Worries
Enslavement
What themes does your work involve?
I am fascinated by everything related to life and human existence in the world of moral choices and life roles, as well as the place where we are. One of the main features of my works is the expression of emotions. Using art I try to raise important issues related to nature and human duality, choosing topics that deal with both the good and bad sides of human nature. My art is an expression of personal experiences and observations, but it does not exist apart from reality.
Describe your creative process.
My paintings are created in stages, first an idea, then reflecting the forms, creating positives, arranging them together, putting them on the canvas and finally covering everything with paint. Each stage requires total dedication and attention. Once I attach the silhouette to the canvas, I hang it in a place with best visibility so that I could keep looking at it. If I find no objections to the form, I paint it and consider it finished.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Existential mechanisms and emotions, such as struggle, strength, fear, but also freedom, love and eroticism as they dynamically enter into dialogue with history, society and human individuality. This is what inspires me - being human. Why do I make art? Because art is a part of me, I can't imagine doing anything else. I have been creating since I remember, the type of creation changes, but not the love of art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
The language of art is universal, it's the language of emotions and senses. The sensations that accompany the feelings awaken a desire to enter into an internal dialogue with the work of art in every sensitive recipient. Attempts to answer questions, creating multifaceted meanings. Here is no general recipe for good art because the concept itself is subjective. Everyone has a different taste. However, the commitment and authenticity of the artist is very important, as is the idea and talent.
What is the role of the artist today?
Nowadays, the role of the artist is very diverse, but it is certainly connected with contact, or more precisely, establishing a bond with the viewer, making him interested, stopping his time motivating him to enter into a dialogue with art.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Daman Gill-Tur

Monday blues

"My art tells my visual story, as my distorted eye perceives the world in fragments with much haze and blurriness.. The layers, the hazy colors, the blur, the lines, the spots all depict my own visual story expressed digitally."

Disheveled
Evolved
Efflorescence

Daman Gill-Tur is a California based self-taught visual artist. She creates abstract paintings using digital medium. After graduating from New York University- College of dentistry, she practiced as a DDS for 10+ years till recent changes with her eye put a pause on that. After losing visual acuity in one eye, she turned to her art and started spanning out pieces which would otherwise have not been created if not for her distorted vision. Her art is a positive spin on her battle with disability.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Nevena Ivanović Guagliumi

Born in: Serbia, 1989
Lives in: Carpi,Italy
Media: Painting, Watercolor, Mixed media, Drawing
Describe your art in three words: Who we are
See More Work:  https://www.instagram.com/nevenaig | nevenaig.com

La mentira - Combined technique on paper 24 x 30 cm

"My work is an analytical study on emotional intelligence and it's a constant work on the raising awareness on that, the most important sphere in the evolution of the personality, but the one so little has been researched about. Yet, it's in our genetic code."

Can't remember - Combined technique on paper 24 x 30 cm
Enjoy the silence - Combined technique on paper 24 x 30 cm
If I could be who you wanted - Combined technique on paper 24 x 30 cm
What themes does your work involve?
My work is based on a spiritual, or rather emotional impression, shown through a portrait as the architecture of reality. As a member of a generation that was growing up in three different states on the same territory, transition is inevitably incorporated in the contexture of my motives. I accomplish functional communication through the fusion of educational and empirical, indicating the dissociation of formal intelligence on the one hand, and emotional and social intelligence on the other.
Describe your creative process.
It starts with a sentence, really. Whether I tell it out loud, or it occurred in my self-talk, in my dream, memory, there is always a sentence that starts the whole mental process behind every piece of my work. (And that sentence usually ends up being a title of the work it started) I start organizing in series, but not always I respect the initial concept, due to the universality of the subjects and their actuality in given context.  
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
As the starting point of all my works, stands the introspection. Since I have always been curious about our reactions on certain actions around/inside of us, I guess the necessity for a communication grew over the inspiration in my case.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is the one that communicates on deep levels of (sub)conscious. The art that makes us move, act upon ourselves, the world. That encourages us to understand the different points of view, and process them in a constructive way. Good art is a good teacher.
What is the role of the artist today?
Artists should represent the worlds to those who cannot see. Whether it's a writer, a movie director, a musician or a painter, artist should open our minds toward the field they explore, they should engage us, because only when that communication, between the art and it's consumer, is established, can we talk about artwork.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Marvel Maring

Born in: USA, 1962
Lives in: Omaha, Nebraska, USA
Media: Mixed media
Describe your art in three words: 1. Acceptance 2. Healing 3. Integration
See More Work:  https://www.artshowinternational.com/artists/marvel-maring

Bardo #10 - Mixed media collage, 9.5" x 22"

"These collages demand that I trust the process–a very tangible act of embracing my so-called “mistakes” and transforming them into something fresh. Philip Guston said, “What joy it is for paint to become a thing--a being. Believe in this miracle-it is your only hope.” I believe in this miracle."

Bardo #21 - Mixed media collage, 22" x 30"
Bardo #20 - Mixed media collage, 22" x 30"
Bardo #19 - Mixed media collage, 22" x 30"
What themes does your work involve?
The act of creating is one that allows me to forge connections and it restores a sense of wholeness. Ironically, the act of destruction became the means by which I rediscovered a sense of wholeness in my latest work. Knowing the remnants of what didn’t work in an earlier piece might find a place in another is healing. Like an archaeological dig into my past work, each fragment reveals my artistic history. Letting these scraps of ruined works build new pieces is a conscious act of acceptance.
Describe your creative process.
Building a collage of remnants of “failed” works has been both healing and liberating. Reusing old works to create new ones helps me see that there are no failures. Remembering this provides room for risk-taking. I can manipulate the surface, moving pieces around the page until a whisper of an idea emerges. Like improvisation in jazz, these pieces have a spontaneous and lyrical quality. My work embraces “mistakes” and challenges my binary thinking of what is good or bad, success or failure
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
The core of my practice is a commitment to process. I love when the thinking mind is quiet and the intuitive mind takes over. I love facing a new piece--watching closely to see what develops. I love making visual decisions with color, shape, movement, and line. Artists Joan Mitchell, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and Helen Frankenthaler, are very inspirational. Taking the raw elements of paint, mark, and surface and creating something that resonates emotionally is nothing short of magical.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I believe a work of art is great when there is not one ounce of self-consciousness left. It's when something surprising happens that you could never have really imagined. Philip Guston said it best in his "Studio Ghosts" quote. He said, "When you're in the studio painting, there are a lot of people in there with you - your teachers, friends, painters from history, critics... and one by one if you're really painting, they walk out. And if you're really painting YOU walk out."
What is the role of the artist today?
Art-making can be an act of courage during destabilizing times, as well as a way to process loss, grief, anger, frustration, and confusion. Now more than ever, I have relied on my studio practice to provide a sanctuary and antidote--a literal and liminal space of possibility and peace. Being in the studio is the one place where I can find a reprieve from the foreboding 24-hour news cycle and find a sense of equilibrium during this volatile time. Ultimately, it is an act of faith in humanity.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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