Lukáš KÁNDL

Born in: 1944, Czech Republic

Lives in: France

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Magic Fantastic Strange

See More Work:  www.kandl.net - www.libelluleart.com

Avida Dollar - Oil on canvas 100 x 230 cm

"I like to think that in another life, I was yet living in Prague, as somebody in charge of Rudolf II’s fabulous collection in which you could find, for example, astrological tools, potions to make gold, the philosophical stone, impenetrable manuscripts full of VITRIOL formula."

What themes does your work involve?
My art includes esoteric and erotic subjects, sensuality, poetry and sometimes an anecdote or even black humor. I also love animal art and to pay tribute to people I admire.
Describe your creative process.
Inspiration comes to me fairly easily. I feel as if ideas were stored in a large spiritual library, with an endless number of books and subjects. I just need to take a stroll in my library, stretch out my hand, and let the composition of my painting appear before me, both magically and very naturally. I always work on only one painting. I choose the format of the canvas according to the size of the main elements I will need. I like to draw things in real size.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am influenced by the Old Masters. I am more especially inspired by themes in the domain of esotericism, poetry, literature, or biblical. I make art because I have the technique and skill for this artistic expression and I love it. I always did it. My father was an artist and I started specialized art school four years before the baccalaureate.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
As I said before, I admire the Old Masters. For me, the technique must be perfectly mastered. It must not be an obstacle to the imagination of the artist but must accompany positively his inspiration. His personal style must be easily recognized by the public.
What is the role of the artist today?
What is the most important to me is to offer paintings in front of which the spectator will take time to sit down, to enter in harmony with the painting, and then have his own walk, as an awaken dream, giving him, even for a short time, a rare and unusual feeling. My dream: that supernatural, strange, sublime and magic, would take more and more space in our lives and that beauty and spirituality would become a life's belief.
Gold Notre Dame, Phoenix Rebirth - Oil on canvas 195 x 130 cm
One Pearl per day for Judith (tribute to Caravaggio) - Oil on canvas 195 x 130 cm
The Lion in Love - Oil on canvas 195 x 130 cm - Tribute to La Fontaine Book IV fable 1
Lohengrin, My Beloved Swan - Oil on canvas - 195 x 130 cm

 


Lukáš KÁNDL received the 1st Place Award in the CFA Artist of the Year 2019 Contest. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Sarah Ann Weber

Born in: 1988, United States

Lives in: Los Angeles, United States

Media: Painting, Watercolor, Mixed media, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Floral, elaborate, vivid

See More Work:  www.sarahannweber.com

The Set Up - Colored pencil on panel, framed 21 x 25 in.

"I draw landscapes that combine my observations and memories of the natural world with abstraction. Here, figures are camouflaged, androgynous, and more plant-based than human. There is beauty, but upon closer inspection, violence and decay are also present."

What themes does your work involve?
By creating environments, I am able to explore gender, decoration and beauty. Focusing on the floral and exotic, my highly detailed, dense compositions become places where growth and entropy, figure and ground, intertwine. My work may foster the hallucinatory experience of seeing a mirage, where navigating the environment is a disorienting but pleasurable experience.
Describe your creative process.
My process of drawing is intuitive. I usually begin a composition with quick, gestural scribbles or paint pours. Then I slow down, honing in on small, intertwining sections. I treat colored pencils like paint, blending the wax-based pigments to create smooth gradients. The marks stay small to draw the viewer in close, where patience is rewarded with subtlety of color and hidden forms revealed.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My work brims with biomorphic forms and gestural marks that mimic the succulents and flowers of southern California (a place I have called home for the last six years), but the compositions are also punctuated with scribbles and brushstrokes that remind the viewer that the spaces are invented. I am inspired by nature in all its forms (wild, tamed, synthetic, fantastic) and how people exist and become part of their environment.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think a work of art is successful if it leaves a viewer with a lingering experience of wonder.
What is the role of the artist today?
I believe it is an artist’s responsibility to be present, reflect, and bear witness to an ever-changing world. Although my artwork has never been overtly political, I work intuitively and from an emotional place, so my practice is undoubtedly affected by how I feel about everything that is going on in the world.
The Plot - Colored pencil on paper, framed 24 x 32 in.
The Watcher - Watercolor and colored pencil on panel, framed 49 x 61 x 2 in.
The Pressure - Colored pencil on paper, framed. 24 x 32 in.
Palm Canyon - Colored pencil on paper, framed. 24 x 32 in.

 


Sarah Ann Weber received the 3rd Place Award in the CFA Artist of the Year 2019 Contest. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Iva Troj

Born in: Plovdiv, Bulgaria (Swedish National)

Lives in: Brighton, United Kingdom

Media: Painting, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Ever-changing, breaking, building

See More Work:  www.ivatroj.com

Sorry To See You Go - Oil on canvas 130 x 58 cm

"As a child, I was taught to question one-dimensional narratives, which grew from a survival technique to a technology of the artistic self. That is probably why I often focus on the normalization of dysfunctional discourses, from the victimization of the female gender to religious dogma and racism."

What themes does your work involve?
The underlying stories, especially the conflicts, are much more interesting to me than mere portraiture. I want to know what’s going on, which is why I have always been interested in research. When I went back to university for a second BA and a Master's, I chose software design, philosophy, and cognitive science rather than fine art, because science fascinates me. My themes are almost always about taking things apart and putting them back together and for that you need to look outside yourself.
Describe your creative process.
I sketch a lot before starting a piece. It's an ongoing thing. The painting technique I mostly use resembles the Flemish method of layering thin veneers of paint between layers of varnish. I am no fan of white canvases so I often prepare my canvases in advance either using pastels and ink or just diluted acrylics. After the underpainting is done I paint a lighter layer with acrylics and finish with a couple of thicker layers using oils, occasionally acrylics, and sometimes gold leaf and ink.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Traditional elements are central to my body of work. It’s not a need to keep the style ”traditional”, but the way I speak. I grew up in a communist country. We sang songs about machines' superiority to man and praised modernity while destroying nature and killing creativity and the human spirit with it. At the same time, my summers were spent in the mountains with my grandmother who had hanging gardens, thousand stories and no TV. My head is full of dichotomies. Art is how I make sense of it all.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
There are two inseparable aspects of the art process that really need to coexist and function together - ideology and skill. Ideology without skill is silly and skill without ideology is empty. The day you find a way to get those two working as a whole is the day you become an artist. And I'm allergic to self-indulgent art. Do we really need one more artist who is only looking to himself for answers? We have a patriarchy to dismantle and a world to save. You can't do that looking at your navel.
What is the role of the artist today?
What is the role of the human today? There is a saying in my family: "If you don't have food on your table, you have one problem. If you have food on your table, you have thousand problems." Artists should be our culture's caretakers and not self-serving, standing on the top of the hill looking down monarchs. We have to stop following the cult of the individual s.c. "genius". It's the ecology of talent that raises us so we need to nurture it. The art industry has killed most of it already.
The Last Swan Oil on canvas 53 x 71 cm
As I Stand So Sad - Oil on canvas 53 x 80 cm
What Gives - Oil on canvas

 


Iva Troj received the 2nd Place Award in the CFA Artist of the Year 2019 Contest. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Marion Tubiana

Born in: 1990, France

Lives in: Garancières, France

Media: Painting, Drawing, Other: Pastel pencil

Describe your work in 3 words: Realism, sensitivity, light

See More Work:  www.mariontubiana.com

Renaissance - Soft pastel 40 x 50 cm

"To give a soul and an emotion to my paintings is before all that I look for. I paint with my heart, I put what I feel and beyond the realism that emerges from my paintings, I try to have this something that will make it more than a photo. The work of looks and dramatic light fascinates me. The eyes reflect the soul and can not lie and it is the light that allows me to give dimension and strength."

What themes does your work involve?
My work represents exclusively animals. They are part of me and if I can help raise awareness of their beauty, their fragility, their rarities, then I would have won everything!
Describe your creative process.
I work oil painting and also pastel, two completely different mediums that give me each a lot of pleasure. The painting is made on canvas mounted on a frame, the pastel is made on Pastelmat paper. The painting will bring strength, the pastel a little more velvety and sweetness ... Whether with my pencils or my brushes, I work in communion with them, hair by hair, so that the details and the realism are crying of truth and that my paintings can deliver their messages, their emotions...
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My paintings are all created from photographs. For my creations, I first select them for what they make me feel, the expression, the look ... then I imagine how I would like to highlight them, the framing, the light that I want. This research sometimes takes me hours and is an integral part of the final work.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I recently came across a quotation that represents well what I think of the work of artist, I allow myself to share it with you: "The work of an artist is hundreds of hours of chess and hopes, months of frustration and moments of pure joy, it is not an object but a piece of heart, a part of the soul, a moment of life." Thus, you will discover, perhaps, a small piece of me on the canvas or paper. That's what I dare to hope.
What is the role of the artist today?
As I said above, the goal of an artist is to be able to get a message across. Everyone will see the message he feels by looking at a work, it may not be the one the painter wanted to get across but as long as something happens in the heart of the viewer then that's what accounts.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jemal Gugunava

Born in: 1950, Tbilisi, Georgia

Lives in: Bristol, UK and Prague, Czech Republic

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Freedom, simplicity, expression

See More Work:  www.gugunava.co.uk - Instagram@jemal_gugunava - Saatchi Art Online

Elene with Pigtails - Oil on canvas 60 x 45 cm

"I don’t like to make statements and talk about my work. I rather communicate with people using a brush, palette knife, canvas and deep oil colours. One thing I can say. I would like to live in a safe and beautiful world and not fear about my children and grandchildren futures. I believe and hope that by doing my art I show the way for the development of humanity and for a better existence."

What themes does your work involve?
I enjoy painting everything that catches my eye and imagination: landscapes, places, streets, people, simple still lives and female forms. This variety of subjects is probably influenced by the academic education I received in the former Soviet Union. It would be boring to paint the same things all the time or something that fits the term “contemporary art” just to be accepted by commercial art galleries. My biggest passion is portraiture. I like to paint people whom I love or who have a mysterious glamour, famous people and especially those not famous. A particular painting reflects my mood and a spontaneous outpouring of emotions that occurs at the moment when I work with a sitter. This magical process is very exciting for me. I paint not a person but a time and state of mind.
Describe your creative process.
My creative process begins when I completely switch off from real life and dive into some other place. Time and space cease to exist around me. The creative process is a subconscious activity: as if the work is being done on its own, as if someone or something is dictating to me what to paint and how. If I could describe my work in words, I would not be an artist, but a writer or poet. I am often asked how I come to the idea of a new work or how I start a new work. I answer them: "I do not know" The same can be said about the completion of a work. The issue of completeness or incompleteness of a work is very complex and controversial. The picture, especially a portrait, continues the maturation process itself after completion of the work.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Music, weather, the sky colors, my mood, wise people’s quotes, pleasing forms, light, beautiful women, Bach, Mozart, Jazz, El Greco, Modigliani, Paolo Veronese, Gerard ter Borch, Johannes Vermeer and many, many other things. When I start working on a portrait, I usually start a few canvases in parallel and finish just one or two. I never work intentionally for exhibitions and I hate deadlines. Some artists say: “I need to work hard because I have a solo exhibition soon”. I don’t understand this kind of motivation. Art is my hobby. LOL! I can’t imagine my life without the smell of paints, varnish and solvent. I don't like to leave my studio for a long time. It feels to me that I'm losing something and wasting time.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art is that which I like. A combination of inspiration, desire and skill to make a piece of great art makes a piece of art great.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist today is the same as it was always. Someone earns money for a good life, satisfying the needs of society and leading galleries, someone earns hardly enough for a piece of bread, and someone works under the motto: I do what I want, when I want and where I want. I belong to the third category. The concept of “Art will save the world”, today, when art has become a product, and the artist’s creativity is a business, unfortunately, does not work. However, the hope still exists. Martin Luther said: “Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree”. We live in a world of borders, restrictions, rules, and responsibilities and an artist can cause us to drop our guard and build connections between people making us better and freer.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Gaetanne Lavoie

Born in: 1978, Cornwall, ON, Canada

Lives in: Kingston, ON, Canada

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Colourful, cheeky, affecting

See More Work:  https://www.gaetannelavoieart.com/

Bite Me - Oil on Linen 18 x 12 in.

"The underlying current in all of my work is my desire to express ideologies of freedom through consciousness. My oval portrait series is based on Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Oval Portrait", about how beauty is simultaneously the creator and destroyer of beauty. My oval portraits are meant to consider dogmas of beauty, consciousness, and identity in relation to the human condition."

What themes does your work involve?
Some themes that are present in my work are spirituality and consciousness, human nature, psychosis, freedom and self-imprisonment. We are the creators of our metaphorical prison and we can choose to change that through awakenings. I like to use symbols; such as, butterflies, hummingbirds, skeletons, cages, furry handcuffs, etc., that enhance ideas of freedom and free will in relation to the thralldom that my culture projects to be "law" but is in actuality "choice". I choose to challenge these beliefs by characterizing contradiction. Finding, listening and following a higher consciousness requires us to go against what we've been taught to do by our cultures which in and of itself is contradictory. I have a North American viewpoint but believe that these themes cross borders.
Describe your creative process.
Because I'm always driven by the same theme, my pictures often change compositions. I work on several different series at the same time. This keeps me interested and believe it or not, focused. I find it difficult to remain interested in working on only one series and having several different types of pictures on the go keeps my attention, which adds to my productivity. In the end, everyone wins! I am a day worker and prefer to wake up early, get my morning started with a great workout and then head to the studio. It's actually quite boring, I work until lunch, eat a bite then work until 4-5 pm. When I have a deadline I'll kick in into high gear, but that's the gist of it. I also need other ways to spend my time away from Fine Art, into athletics, family, friends, and greenhouse hopping. 😉
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Humans influence my work. Seeking inspires me. I make art because I have no other choice.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I remember being in undergrad and the BIG conversation was "What is art? Can you define art?" Their answer was almost always "No" and that the plastic cafeteria chair was no less art than Michelangelo's David. I, on the other hand, believe that you can define art, and will even go so far as to say that there is such a thing as good and even better, great art. Art is subjective and what a collector loves is indicative of their personal aesthetic. Regardless of personal taste, there is a rhythm to great art which consists of practice, training, understanding and deliberate choice along with natural instinct and impulse. Great art involves the artist having the expertise to know when to make a deliberate aesthetic choice or to allow your process to flow.
What is the role of the artist today?
I think the artist today is what the artist always was. I create art partly because I love it, partly because I can't live without it, partly because I have a lot to say and rather than bore everyone around me with my antics, creating a work of art is a much more interesting means of communication. Artists are leaders and revolutionaries who have the potential to change the world as we know it...and the funniest bit about that is that you don't need to be an "artist" to be an artist. Every human on the planet has the potential to live an artistically inspired life. The role of the artist today is to follow the beat of their own drum and exemplify that life to their surrounding cultures and if part of that is creating "artwork" then our planet is more beautiful because of it.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jolanda Richter

Born in: 1971, The Netherlands

Lives in: Lower Austria

Media: Painting, Drawing, Printmaking

Describe your work in 3 words: Always be authentic

See More Work:  www.jolanda.at

And All Darkness Faded I -
Oil on canvas 60 x 80 cm

"I would describe my style as autonomic and figurative. I feel a strong affinity to the "old masters artists", particularly when it comes to symbolism and the visionary art. My art can be interpreted as katathym imaginative pictorial creations. The source of my work can be traced back to my childhood, to mental scars and fears, but also to my desires, dreams and hopes."

What themes does your work involve?
I often use poetical elements and ethereal figures in my artwork. Figures are often flying and floating, they are weightless and totally detached from the apparent linear reality. My paintings are an open system for the viewer. When I present my work the viewer is asked to reflect on his or her own emotions.
Describe your creative process.
The ideas for my paintings develop from a complex inner process. Psychology is one key for decoding my artwork because I deal a lot with psychological subjects. These influences result in a specific picture in my head. After that, I "only" have to paint these images in an appropriate way. But of course, there are many other steps in between. For example, I find it of great importance to interact closely with my models in order to express my ideas by means of their body language and mimic.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Involving psychology, philosophy, literature, and the various media are influences that come to resonate with my inner world. My paintings are part of myself, completely and authentically, Music is also a very important part of my life and my art, I studied Violoncello first, before studying visual arts. So art is the only way to express myself.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
This is a question you shouldn't ask because these days there is no appropriate answer. But for me, there is always one question: does this artwork just entertain you or does it elevate you? For me, good art has to elevate viewers. Otherwise, it has no relevance ... at least for me.
What is the role of the artist today?
I can only talk about myself. So for me the role of an artist today should be that artworks open new ways of thinking to viewers in all aspects of life. And not just to provoke people to be part of media and art market.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Mathieu Nozieres

Born in: 1988, France

Lives in: Grenoble, France

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Light, Heavy, United

See More Work:  www.mathieunozieres.com

Boy On Horse - Acrylic on canvas 180 x 200 cm

"My themes develop around the interest I have for mankind, nature and all the forms of life and non-life that surround us. Trying to bring all of this diversity together is one of the keystones of my work."

What themes does your work involve?
The subjects often present protagonists accompanied by a horse or a bird, symbol of a certain strength and freedom that each of us tries to reach. Each painting brings together many opposing forces that can battle in us: Lightness and heaviness, impulse and restraint, fast and slow, active and passive, ephemeral and permanent. Nature is also present in my compositions, reminding us of where we come from and ultimately where we will return.
Describe your creative process.
A new series is generally associated with a new reflection on a certain question. The process is like a puzzle, each painting contributing to the final answer. Technically speaking I work in a traditional way: First a drawing and then a painting. A work is finished when what I add damages the image instead of embellishing it. Time to stop!
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My work is influenced by both French masters E. Delacroix and T. Géricault. The power of their work often stimulates my own resources. The more I learn to paint, the more I learn to live. And vice versa. This close bond that I feel between painting and life is probably the reason why I make art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
It is hard to define what is good or bad in art and in life in general. I guess that as long as the artist strives to make this world a more egalitarian, empathetic and peaceful place that’s fine. We should not forget that art is here to help at least one person, the artist himself or the viewer. If this is achieved I guess it can be considered a useful piece of art, which is great!
What is the role of the artist today?
From my point of view: The role of an artist, whether of today or yesterday, is probably the same as for any other human being: To evolve and develop his/her full potential. By doing this our practice (whatever the field) could be elevated to the rank of Art. Each human being has the responsibility of an artist and each artist has the responsibility of a human being.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


David Safhay

Born in: 1955, USA

Lives in: Lakeville, Pennsylvania, USA

Media: Painting, Sculpture, Watercolor, Drawing, Printmaking, Video, Mixed media/assemblage

Describe your work in 3 words: Making matter matter!

See More Work:  www.davidsafhay.com

Bark Quatet - Ash bark, watercolor, Polymer clay, graphite, 4 aluminum framed walnut cradles 36 x 96 x 2 in.

"In my early works, I drew from nature to learn how things grew to look the way they do. Structures and surfaces possessed properties that one could reproduce if you had the eye and hand. The more believable or convincing a piece grew, the more closely you would have to observe nature. I would do this until my later years where I shifted towards sculpture where 3D would contribute to verisimilitude."

What themes does your work involve?
My work was always concerned with color and later on how color could be integrated into form as illusion became real and form could be enhanced by illusion. In my mid-life, my "Machines" were contraptions that calculated/mutated colors by such mechanical means, that the objects themselves became sculptures with kinetic aspects. These inventions helped me root out the source of luminescence which has been a lifelong inquiry. What makes a field of wheat shimmer in the summer so? I found out and displayed my discoveries in my show: "The Mechanics of Color, 1992". Later I used this odd art form to address intellectually, what it was I was trying to say. The old art school saw: "What is Art". My Machine #12 answers that question in "The Debate" once and for all!
Describe your creative process.
I observe nature and isolate what intrigues me with any given subject. I then focus my attention on the natural phenomena that created such a pleasing response in me and try to amplify or elaborate on this aspect to let the viewer in on my fascination. In my sculptural studies, I would call this "Extrapolating Nature" which I named a show in 2014. In these works, I would extend into space an artifact entirely of nature's doing, and extend it in any or all directions as seamlessly as possible... This I considered a partnership with nature: she providing the surprise, me providing the aesthetics. Nature can be too random, and man too cerebral. These objects (I thought) made for an interesting marriage that was grounded in nature, but with man's ingenuity. It was liberating after my Machines.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Understanding and capturing luminescence has always been a goal for me. Once I felt I had mastered its basics, I felt I could move on to issues like What is Art? Why make it? and how can I contribute to the crowded history of it? How is my unique voice valid or necessary in this age of vanity, indulgence, and gluttony? In my Paradise/Perfidy animation short, I turn Heaven into Hell and back again in an endless loop of words forming patterns and mutating their meanings into opposites as the poles in "polemics" One of the sequences is the history of art. "Art Started As Rite" to morph as time went on into: "Art Ended As Trite". Which is my prediction by the way. This work came from my show" Aesthetic Polemics, 2004". You may request a copy if interested. It is luminescence with meaning!
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I believe I covered that ground nicely with an actual sculpture. The "Debate" mentioned above says it all and in a beautiful and unique art form. If a picture is worth a thousand words then surely a sculpture is worth a thousand pictures. That is how I got seduced away from painting in the first place. But found even sculpture sometimes wanting in meaning, so I started employing words for not just their intrinsic meaning, but also for their pointillist properties and in grouping together, their syntactical and linguistic, mathematical aspects. To employ all these tools/materials in a cohesive and meaningful way has been a lifelong challenge indeed! Sometimes I feel like a one-man movement and will not live long enough to finish my thesis.
What is the role of the artist today?
I feel like artists are the Templars of variety. After the industrial revolution, man's imperative was to feed, shelter, and amuse the masses as efficiently as possible. Mass production everything would homogenize things that did not want to be homogenized, even people!.WE were all to be stamped out of the same molds so we could more readily be counted and identified. Art, too, started to look the same and designed to meet average expectations with were also mass-produced sentiments. Real artists defy all that and usually die defying the ordinary. Entropy is where all matter tends. This bleak view that all matter eventually bleaches, dries, erodes into uniform, grey dust is so depressing to me that in my life I want to defy expectations in the most permanent fashion I can afford.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Philip Noyed

Born in: 1959, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Lives in: Minneapolis, Minnesota

Media: Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Film/analog photography, Digital Photography, Digital Media, Installation, Mixed media, Video, LED Lights, Acrylic Art, Virtual Reality

Describe your work in 3 words: Color Light Activation

See More Work:  http://www.PhilipNoyed.com

Skyfall - Lamda durantran print, acrylic, LED lights 4 x 3 ft

Philip Noyed creates luminous art that explores light, color and space in two and three dimensions. He combines the use of abstract photography, digital manipulation, acrylic fabrication, printing technologies, LED lights and VR to create innovative color and light experiences.

What themes does your work involve?
I create a series called "Geometric Illuminations" that uses abstract fractal photography mounted on acrylic and lit with LED lights or natural light to create sculptural forms. These geometric forms can be wall-mounted, free-standing or mobiles. My newer work is created as public art installations, light experiences and Virtual Reality experiences.
Describe your creative process.
My series is based on a radical reinterpretation of photography. I photograph my abstract paintings using a variety of unique, fast-action, slow shutter speeds and then digitally amplify and free sample the images: cutting, skewing, distorting and merging to form new geometric configurations. I use acrylic fabrication and LED lights to create the illuminated sculptural forms. I also explore the new: creating light art, video projections, mobiles, new materials, printing techniques and VR.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Art provides a means of exploration and discovery. Technology keeps improving and providing new avenues of exploration - from using lights as a sculptural form to creating in Virtual Reality. I love to create art that is a transformational experience for viewers. I hope they are inspired and activated by the art I create.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Great art is transformational emotionally and intellectually for people experiencing the art, people of any age or background. Colors and light are frequencies and have the power to affect people both psychologically and physiologically. Great art creates great and memorable experiences that activate and inspire people. Great art also has a healing power.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist today is to be a pioneer riding the wave of technological advancements to create art in new ways. Create paintings that are 3D when seen with chromadepth glasses. Create Virtual Reality light experiences that people enter into. Use lights to create architectural forms. Use mirrors, acrylic, lights, dichroic film to create immersive experiences. Augment reality. Project videos as forms. Always pushing the creative and experience forward. Create art that activates.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist