Josea Bee

Born in: Hong Kong

Lives in: Hong Kong

Media: Illustration

Describe your work in 3 words: Yin Yang symbol

See More Work:  www.joseabee.com

Eye Contact

"In a world of duality, many things are defined and demarcated. However, "existence" and "non-existence" are more a concept than a reality. People tend to perceive "existence” merely through time, space and matter; but when you change your consciousness, your mind can be changed."

What themes does your work involve?
Part of the inspirations of my current artworks comes from an exploration of ancient religious cultures; together with my own unique perceptions and abstract memories of consciousness, soul, etc., and delicate brush strokes, my artworks try to convey philosophical and religious thoughts of life.
Describe your creative process.
Essentially speaking, sensations, feelings, insights, fantasies - all these are private and personal, and art is one way to give one peace of mind and inner tranquility, while philosophy is one way to understand life. Everything is narrated through symbols and combined with relevant experiences and messages, she strives to convey a harmonic integration of philosophy, art, rituals and society.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
If one is aware of the otherness of things and visualize closely, one can easily enter the realm of spiritual vision and transfer. Even situations, things and sensations encountered and experienced in daily life can penetrate into the subconscious unconsciously. Yet in dreams, they turn into something like sailboats and guide you through the sea. Being taught, informed and experienced, I am like a recorder on a voyage.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Nowadays, humans cannot live without communication channels like verbal and body languages and other sign systems. People need to understand and transmit information through them. Any symbols, signs, verbal and body languages, etc., that run through and ripple across people's hearts also can be regarded as “good art”.
What is the role of the artist today?
Our society is overwhelmed with materialism nowadays and the blindfolded focus only on the immediate illusion. But reality is actually far beyond the things in front of us. We are just living in an illusion that is falsely treated as the only reality. Artists are one of those roles who can awake people's souls and guide them into another reality.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Alexander

Born in: 1975, England

Lives in: Stockholm, Sweden

Media: Painting, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Authentic, personal, diligent

See More Work:  alexanderlee.artspan.com - IG@alexander.lee.3110 - Gagliardi Gallery London

Alternate Sources - Pencil Drawing on Paper 60 x 50 cm

"The idea of avoiding or breaking the mold appeals to me so as the idea of immortality which is unavailable to me through the limitations of the material world."

“Insanity is the only sane reaction to an insane society.”
― Thomas Stephen Szasz.

What themes does your work involve?
People, places and things. Generally, my art is about myself and my inner and outer connection to my immediate environment, It's about my isolation in grief after having lost both my parents tragically and how I am continuously attempting to move forward and stay connected. These emotions are encapsulated in my works as waves, movements, power and rhythmic surges of energy, It's a cycle which will end only when everything ends.
Describe your creative process.
An idea presents itself; inspired by a mood, a conversation, a need, a want, an ambition. However crude it may initially be, rough and rudimentary, I know that in a few days I will have a lucid image in my mind, an uncontrollable process. The piece is clear. It's like the transformation we see in nature when a caterpillar turns into a butterfly, which sometimes appears in my work. I never know quite when a piece is finished. In the studio, the viewers perspective or maybe it is never finished?
What influences your work? What inspires you?
The original impressionists! Not necessarily their artwork, but the stories of them. And the impact of my direct environment: the coast of Western Australia, the mountainous peaks of the Alps and the contrasts of dramatic seasonal change in Scandinavia. Keneticism i.e the ever changing, the constant struggle between the unstoppable force meeting the irremovable object which is a state we seem to dwell within.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
It’s emotive art. Art that leaves you with an impression; you leave with a little bit of it. It's when you feel that the experience has changed you to a degree. If a piece is good also depends on the viewer, "I can bore you in a day or I can shock you in an instant but how many lifetimes would it take to create universal beauty?"
What is the role of the artist today?
I see the role of the artist today as to provoke thought and to evoke satisfaction.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Anson Liaw

Born in: 1965, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.

Lives in: Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada

Media: Digital Media, Illustration, Mixed media, Collage, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Deceptive, educational, sublime

See More Work:  http://www.illoz.com/liaw

Taking Lives - App. 20 x 30 in.

"I feel I am useless as an artist when I am happy. Pain is what creates my artwork. The painful experiences that people go through as they journey through life from childhood to adulthood which is full of chaos and hardship are what motivates me to possess my objectives to make purposeful artwork."

What themes does your work involve?
My illustrations take on critical views; both light & heavy about life in the world around us and that deals with relevant social, political, cultural issues and lifestyle subject matter.
Describe your creative process.
Ideas for creative images to happen could spark and take shape anywhere at any given time while I am awake and sleeping. From what is happening on the news, something I read and understood, something someone said or did or a word or re-thinking an existing or new quote, a relevant idea for a new piece is given birth. Knowing well about the variety of art media I love to use, I combine their behavior naturally and make them function in-sync with my visual voice within my storytelling piece(s).
What influences your work? What inspires you?
Art movements and reasons behind their original purposes, mixing of art movements and all cultural influences, the idea that beauty is within everything; light and dark and good and bad, the careful observation, investigation and appreciation of the world around us and visual ideas that compel people to think and act intertwine and function together to represent and serve as my creative influences and inspiration to make my artwork.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Great art possesses the characteristics of using the principles of design well like unity, balance, emphasis, proportion, scale and rhythm to help communicate image-making ideas visually yet at the same time, pushes the boundaries with them in mind and in action in an interesting way somehow to surprise me, that violates my customary valuations of things and that offers me new and other unexpected ones.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because I believe that art and artists play a huge role in society. And artists with their art possess a unique voice for things that need to be addressed, have great creative powers in society and therefore, the artist has a great responsibility to make a positive impact and make the world to be a better place somehow with the gift to be able to share their visual ideas from a small to large scale for any age group for people in the world around us.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Gretchen Geneis Dugan

Born in: 1952, USA

Lives in: Branford, Connecticut USA

Media: Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Reverence for life

See More Work:  www.backseatstudio.com

Spring - Graphite 27 x 21 in.

"My hands are directly connected to my heart, and my heart is taken by what I see."

What themes does your work involve?
Shapes, contrast, and beauty.
Describe your creative process.
I have been given the ability to draw and feel certain images are worth creating, to express sentiment.
What influences your work? What inspires you?
Random images and ideas that are beyond my control propel me to pick up the pencil and paper.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Great art is a gift from God.
What is the role of the artist today?
Anyone can throw paint on canvas, not everyone can direct it with purpose and create an image worth saving.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Matt Patterson

Born in: 1981, USA

Lives in: New Hampshire, USA

Media: Painting, Illustration, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Art for Conservation

See More Work:  www.mpattersonart.com

Blandings Turtles - Acrylic 23 x 18 in.

"There's almost no distance I won't go, almost nothing I won't do, to learn all I can about my subjects to make my paintings of wild animals as accurate and lifelike as possible."

What themes does your work involve?
I am a wildlife illustrator/artist that specializes in reptiles and amphibians, particularly turtles and tortoises.
What influences your work? What inspires you?
I'm inspired by nature. From as far back as I remember, I've loved both wildlife and art. I grew up in the small, rural New Hampshire town of New Ipswich. In my free time, I was always either out fishing, searching for turtles and snakes or I was painting. My father was a biology teacher and our home hosted a large menagerie of animals, including a turtle named Heathcliff and two pigeons named Mel and Leroy.
What is the role of the artist today?
I would say the role of an artist depends on the artist. For me, I feel it's crucial not just to document these marvelous species I paint; it's even more important to me to have a hand in saving them from extinction. Among reptiles alone, 196 species are presently critically endangered. That's why I'm a signature member of Artists for Conservation. That's why I often create artwork specifically to donate proceeds from its sale for conservation.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jess Ridley

Born in: 1988, United Kingdom

Lives in: Hampshire, UK

Media: Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Wildlife - Realism - Character

See More Work: www.jessridleyart.com, www.instagram.com/jessridleyart

Heavy Sleeper - Graphite - A3

Jess began drawing at the age of two on her parent's wallpaper! She spent her life pursuing a performing career and traveled the world, whilst continuously working on her drawing skills. What began as a hobby and a great way to express her passion for wildlife now plays a much larger role in her life.

What themes does your work involve?

The theme of my work is animals and wildlife. Creating realistic representations of endangered animals (and sometimes pets) is something that gives me great satisfaction due to my passion for the natural world and the living beings we share it with. Animals have as much character if not more than some humans I know! They are fascinating and I love capturing their qualities.

Describe your creative process.

My pieces are usually inspired by an experience I have had with wild animals. I then choose a reference photo based on the emotions experienced and how I want the animal to be portrayed. I severely lack patience, which is a challenge when the work I do is usually very intricate! I often find it takes me a while to feel comfortable with where the piece is going and also struggle to know when to stop...I guess this is something that I will always be working on!

What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?

My love of animals influences my work. I am deeply concerned by the way in which we treat this planet and it seems that despite the increase in awareness of this issue, we are still ploughing quickly towards a point of no return. It is predicted that some of our most magnificent species will no longer walk the face of the planet within my lifetime. I draw these animals to express my passion for this subject and hope I will soon be in a position to donate to their protection through sales.

What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?

There are plenty of people that will claim realism is not a form of art, but merely a skill. I truly believe that anything that is created with a passion and meaning behind it and a message or feeling to convey makes great art. Something that moves you or makes you question and requires a level of skill to create.

What is the role of the artist today?

Life is turbulent. The artist and the arts, in general, are such a powerful medium through which to communicate, understand, express, escape and teach. The artist is responsible for igniting these feelings in the viewer and opening up the creative mind and its possibilities.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Michael Mutschler

"My pictures implement spontaneous gestures, impulses. I have always tried to translate emotional moods into pictures. I collect motifs by actively observing. My collection of figures is large, after all, I am already over 70 years old!"

Kaltstart, 2018 - Acrylic on canvas 80 x 60 cm

German Artist, Michael Mutschler was born (1947) in Heilbronn (Baden-Württemberg). His father was the artist and educator Rudolph Mutschler, and his sister is the artist and architect Eva Petzold. Art and art history have always played the most important role in his life. Mutschler studied at the Kunstakademie Stuttgart.

Numerous stays in Greece and Italy as a youth informed his aesthetics, as well as a later three-month trip through Italy - on a  ten Deutschmarks budget.

"As a (young) father of two and later four children, I found it sometimes exhausting but also enriching to come to terms with little means."

"We were struggling over the concept of art. Joseph Beuys helped me out of conservative concepts and one of his students, Holger Utta, taught me. I read a lot, Erich Fromm, C.G. Jung, Mitscherlich and had first encounters with Anthroposophy. I was with Prof. Schellenberger in the master class for Puppetry, where we developed experimental theatre, in an attempt to see man as part of art.

Our performance "Ich - Sklave - Über-ich - Sklave, Roboter - Sklave" moved a reporter of the Süddeutscher Rundfunk II (21.2.1971, 22.30) to this statement: "The following actions", says the reporter, skeptical about the title, "a mixture of pantomime, puppet play and effective visuals, fascinated so directly that at times one seemed to gaze spellbound at the stage of one's own consciousness".

His analysis: "The simple fact, still fresh today and more ingeniously disguised than ever, that we are all puppets at times and have to free ourselves from the tormenting state," aptly sums up the driving force behind my artistic work. Incidentally, the discussion has lost nothing of its relevance for me.

A longhaired art teacher wearing a corduroy suit, I came to grammar school, where the old spirit still reigned. The headmaster was speechless in the face of this performance. I took Joseph Beuys with me to this school - everyone is an artist. That's not directly aimed at brush and easel, no: every person is able to lead a situation to a better one by himself - if they have access to creativity and empathy in the here and now. From my point of view, this positive presence allows us to do justice to people, to act humanely. So, art and pedagogy merge. Hard to chew for some of those present in the teaching staff. I also understood my teaching activity as compensation for my own, often humiliated student soul."

Michael Mutschler now lives in Machern near Leipzig. After almost 40 years as an art teacher, he now enjoys the freedom of the pensioner and, nourished by his first successes, he feels so free to exhibit his works in public, much of which was created in the last five years.

Der Großinspirator, 2018 - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 100 cm
Gesellschaftsschichten, 2019 - Acrylic on canvas 70 x 50 cm
Klima - Klimax - Acrylic on canvas 2019, 120 x 100 cm
Suche nach Wärme, 2016 - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 70 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Jim Resnick

"I try to capture the flow of energy on paper. I try not to force anything, but to just let it happen...let it flow on its own. I do pen and ink originals and then produce giclee prints from the originals. I get my creative energy from nature and try to let it flow through me onto the paper."

TerraCine - Pen and ink 17 x 14 in.

Select Awards, Exhibits and Publications

2019 – Contest Finalist, TerraCine, Circle Foundation For the Arts, online contest, ArtExpo NY.

2018 – Exquisite Arts Magazine, Spring Issue #8, March 2018, Jim Resnick, Pages 31 – 34

2017 – 3rd place, “Don’t Stare at the Sun”, International Gallery of the Arts, online juried show, Black and White competition.  “Cosmos”, also accepted.

2014 – Group Art Show – 3 works, Brath and Hughes Art Gallery, Mechanicsburg, PA

2013 – Featured Artist – Shereen’s Exquisite Fine Art Gallery, Frederick, MD

2012 – Two works accepted, 14th Annual Abstraction Juried Online International Art Exhibition, Upstream People Gallery.

2012 – Group Art Show – 6 works – Shereen’s Exquisite Fine Art Gallery, Frederick, MD

2011 – Art Undressed Tour – travelling exhibition, 3 works accepted, Miami, Montreal, Toronto, Key West, Atlanta.

2011 – Worlds Greatest Erotic Art of Today, Vol. 4, Page 80. Pen and Ink Drawing, Butterfly.

2010 – Erotic Signature, Juried show entry

2008 – Master Class Artist, American Juried Art Salon, biannual international art competition

2007 – Two works accepted, American Juried Art Salon, biannual international art competition

1982 – One man show, Arts Club of Washington, Washington, D.C.

1981 – One man show, Capital Gallery, Capital Centre, Landover, MD

1977-1980 – Various art awards and juried exhibitions

Big Bang Black Hole - Pen and ink 17 x 14 in.
Cosmos - Pen and ink 17 x 14 in.
Don't Stare At The Sun - Pen and ink 17 x 14 in.
Butterfly - Pen and ink 17 x 14 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Maryse-Anne Couteau

"I draw with colored and black pencils, and also with very fine Rotring. Anything can inspire me but I enjoy drawing the human body in a fantasy world."

La Gardienne du Temple - Color pencils 30 x 30 cm

Maryse-Anne Couteau is a self-taught artist living and working in France. The pencil has long been her favorite medium and she employs a coloring pencil technique, not widely used by grown-ups! In recent years she has also been working in ink.

In her early work, Couteau used very little color and instead focused on fine graphics to successfully suggesting volume with a black stroke gently underlined in color.  Color increasingly imposed itself and eventually supplanted the line. At first, her tones were quite assertive but gradually became more refined. By superimposing different colors, Couteau creates mixes and nuances, which are a strong characteristic in her work.

Although the human body and face have a great place in her world, Maryse-Anne Couteau is not limited to any particular style or type of representation; staging objects as well as animals and people. The artist finds an inexhaustible source of inspiration in the real world; the fertility of her imagination and her keen sense of observation intermingle a wonderful inner universe and a precise and detailed reality.

In her surprisingly original compositions, we see the impossible desire to get right up close to the subject and reach its very essence. The covering, the sliding, the transparency of surfaces, in reality opaque, the repetition of shapes at different scales or the modification of angles of view on the same subject testify to a wish to see higher and deeper; to embrace the subject in its totality instead being limited to the superficial; to see further by projecting into the future and the past; to explore beneath the surface of things; go beyond the limit traced by the outlines and reach the infinite riches that hide in every aspect of reality.

After years of studies and a professional life, which was far from artistic, Maryse-Anne Couteau has decided to invest herself entirely in drawing and has devoted herself for nearly thirty years to her passion.

Le Vin Nouveau - Pencil 15 x 19 cm
Empilement - Ink 18 x 18 cm
A Fleur De Thé - Color pencils 14 x 30 cm
Chaussure à Son Pied - Color pencils 38 x 38 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Martha Espinoza

Martha Espinoza is a bird, marine life, wildlife, and botanic illustrator. On every artwork she wants to show the beauty that can be found at national parks, wildlife refuges and biological center of her home country, Costa Rica and other countries.

Amazilia Versicolor - Watercolor 22 x 14 in.

Martha Espinoza is a bird, marine life, wildlife and botanic illustrator.

Behind every detail, color, shadow, texture and structural pattern of her illustrations, there is an entire world of knowledge, hours of observation and contact with nature. Espinoza is a Member of the American Society Botanical Artists ( ASBA). She lives and works in Costa Rica.

"Keep your love towards nature because it is the true way to understand art more and more." -  Vincent Van Gogh

Pterois Antennata - Watercolor 22 x 14 in.
Stanhopea Wardii - Watercolor 22 x 14 in.
Zingiber Zerumbet - Watercolor 70 x 50 in.
Oxypogon Lindenii - Watercolor 22 x 14 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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