Georg Douglas

Born in: 1945, N. Ireland
Lives in: Mosfellsbær, Iceland
Describe your art in three words: Joyful, colourful, complex
Education: BSc, PhD in Earth Science
See More Work: artgeorg.com

"I like my paintings to be strong, whether from colour, form or something else. I want them to invoke an immediate reaction, either confronting the viewers or drawing them in to the work. They do not require much analysis or philosophical consideration, but rather appeal to the emotions and create an atmosphere. The world of flowers and Irish dance have been my inspiration for some time."

What themes does your work involve?
For several years my themes have been the plant and floral world and Irish dance. Although disparate themes I emphasize movement in both and often get comments on how similar the work is.
Describe your creative process.
The majority of my paintings originate as random ideas which come to me when outside in nature, lying in bed, at the theatre or elsewhere. Some have been turning over in my head for a long time, others not. I start with a very simple basic drawing which I try to keep throughout. Otherwise I let the painting evolve very much on its own.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My inspiration is the beauty of nature. I was born and raised in the country and have always had a close connection to nature both in work and play. I have never had doubts about its beauty. My art is probably to some extent an attempt to express this in its many aspects and convey it to others.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think good art needs to be original or even unique in some way, whether subject, style colour or whatever. Even so, great art may be great only for the viewer, for I think the input in all visual art is 50% from the artist and 50% from the viewer.
What is the role of the artist today?
Do what he or she must do and let us see it. Art was always close even when I was working in a completely different field and it never went away completely. I later years I slowly realised that this is what I should probably have been doing all along. Art is such a huge field that it´s hard to define its function in modern society. However I think that exposure is the key element. It needs to be everywhere and varied. With the Internet I think that this has already happened to a large extent. Circle Foundation For the Arts is an excellent example of an organisation making this possible.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Nicolas Castell

Born in: 1998, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lives in: Granada, Spain
Describe your art in three words: vivid, graphic, dreamy
Education: MFA in Drawing from the University of Granada (Spain)
See More Work:  https://www.nicolascastell.com/ | Instagram 

"I have been working as an artist with more than twenty exhibitions in recent years, as a freelance illustrator for advertising, children's books, comics, cinema, music, and more. Some of my clients have included The Times, The Washington Post, Dupuis, SM, Adobe, Mercedes-Benz, Paradores, and Santillana. In my illustrations, I strive to create narrative scenes that blend elements of history and fantasy, weaving together compelling visual stories that captivate and engage viewers."

What themes does your work involve?
Dreams, fantasy, history, biographies, Japan and science fiction.
Describe your creative process.
I read the briefing few times while I try to make the perfect scene in my mind. Then I play with it doing my sketches with pencil. After the composition y settled I ink it and then I play with the colors!
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Life in general, a ride with the bicycle can be inspiring, a trip to a different culture as well. When I can't travel I enjoy books and movies. An interesting dream or meditation can inspire me too. I make art because I love it, and I need it too. It's something beyond my will, if I not do it I'm not feeling myself.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art happens when the artist is able to portray his emotions and ideas in the piece. Sometimes you can have a good idea, but if you didn't master the craft enough, that idea can be lost during the process of that piece of art. Maybe because the artist is not skillful, or maybe because the artist is confused.
What is the role of the artist today?
To connect with the people, to make this living experience less horrible inviting the people to dream, to travel with the imagination and to know there are more like us, that people of other countries they love, work and suffer too, we're not that different, art is the best way to connect first with oneself, and second with the world.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Toti Cuesta

“Art arises from my spiritual need to create, to go beyond the senses. It is an expression of the soul and a magical experience. The use of symbols and color characterize my paintings. Symbols allow me to express and transmit the message of art. The color radiates the light of each human being.”

Release Proserpine - Watercolor 76 x 56 cm

“I am a watercolor artist based in Madrid. I studied Law and Languages, and for many years I worked in the international field, but art has always been my great passion and the engine of my life. I am also trained as an Art Therapist because of the healing power that I feel art has.

Since I was a child, there was a creativity in me that grew more and more. This was understood and valued in my environment as a hobby, but I knew it was much more than that. I began an inner search that allowed me to discover who I was and what I had come here to do. It helped me free myself from everything that others had chosen, thinking that it was what was best for me, but that had nothing to do with my essence.

I define myself as a watercolorist, although I have done numerous works with other techniques such as oil and pastel. Watercolor is the most luminous and transparent technique, the one that can best represent the vibration of other dimensions and capture it in colors that transmit joy and light.”

School of angels - Watercolor 76 x 56 cm
Music - Watercolor 76 x 56 cm
Let´s go back home - Watercolor 56 x 76 cm
Erato absent - Watercolor 76 x 56 cm

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Liyuan Liu

Insight - Oil and mixed media on canvas 275 x 150 cm $130,000

Liu Liyuan graduated from the Department of Dyeing and Clothing department at Tsinghua Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. She loves painting and began to learn it during her childhood. Liyuan has completed research on classical and modern art and has excelled in studying figure painting. Now living in Vancouver, Liyuan has studied under the famous oil painter Xue Yanqun and the Chinese painting and calligraphy master Liang Zhaotang for many years.

Liyuan is also engaged in the application work of art advancement to famous schools in North America, helping students apply for prestigious schools in North America and Europe and has many years of experience with a 100% success! Her students have won many awards in the World Cup Art Drawing Competition and continuously published professional art guidance articles in the media such as Metropolis Daily, Global Chinese News, Afar, and Altitude, as well as accepted personal interviews.

In 2017, Liyuan did personal interviews with the columns of Canadian City TV "Elegance" and "Dating in the City." At the same time, she has been invited to give lectures on the Canadian Chinese Radio "Art Special Interview" and "Live Broadcast of the Guidance Series of Prestigious Art Schools". 

In 2021 and 2022, she participated in the Vancouver artist group exhibition with five works. Liyuan's oil paintings have won awards in Switzerland; her watercolor works have also won awards on online exhibitions in the United States; her works have also been published in the well-known French artist magazine "Circle Quarterly Art Review."

Still Life Homer in Louvre - Oil on canvas 48 x 63 cm $9,000
Floating - Oil on canvas 129 x 86 cm $19,000
Read Picasso - Oil on canvas 60 x 90 cm $17,000
Bubble - Oil on canvas 170 x 135 cm $86,000
Studio - Oil on canvas 210 x 145 cm
The Mask - Oil on canvas 145 x 127 cm
Nirvana - Oil on canvas 220 x 88 cm
Butterfly - Oil on canvas 154 x 110 cm
Lay Out - Oil on canvas 156 x 120 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Ashima Kumar

Ashima Kumar is a visual artist working at the cutting edge of Fine Art and Graphic Design. Her style is a unique fusion of doodle art with traditional style and digital media. Ashima juxtaposes graphic simplicity with painterly strokes. Her artworks are symbolic of Beauty, Wonder and Serenity.

Circle of Unity - Mixed media 89 x 58 cm

“Art can penetrate the deepest part of us where no words exist”. 

Ashima Kumar is a visual artist from India living in the UK. After completing her BFA degree in applied arts, Ashima started to work at the cutting edge of Graphic Design and Fine Art. Her style is a unique fusion of doodle art, traditional art, and modern technology. Her creative works are a connection between humanity and the natural environment. Ashima juxtaposes geometric simplicity with painterly strokes, drawing inspiration from traditional folk-art forms and natural patterns. 

Her work is often considered a fine example of what possibilities happen when you pair clean, strong forms with a powerful message. Her effort has been to showcase how, with the use of bold and rule-breaking visual language, visual art can inspire and be a vital element in the growth of businesses and also in nudging public perceptions in desirable ways. She describes her artistic technique as threefold: "dream, doodle, design." She is always seeking to transform the experiential into visible patterns and definite forms. Her creations are spontaneous. She translates her thoughts and narrates the story into patterns and composition using fine line drawings and colours. 

Her passion for creating art and challenging moral themes have enabled her to become a regular contributor to multiple art fairs and exhibitions e.g., Focus Art - Louvre, The Swiss Art Fair, Art Basel Miami, Flux Exhibition etc. Her art has been featured in several publications like Aesthetica, Flux Review, Spotlight Magazine, 365 art+ Magazine, The New Art Book 2019, The Home and Gardens, Times of India, India Design World, etc. She is fast gaining a reputation as an international artist. 

Her art has not only been displayed at art exhibitions but has also struck a chord with organizations seeking to build/extend their brand identity.  

Ashima utilises elements from her art practice to impart tools for well-being. An absolute sensory and tactile delight, her therapy.

Nothing is lost yet - Mixed media 28 x 40 cm
Affection - Mixed media 42 x 60 cm
Looking Ahead - Mixed media 28 x 40 cm
Relationship - Mixed media 50 x 70 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Mina Moe

Hope. Commitment. Resilience. This is what my art conveys - inspired by art, mathematics, science, and economics studies.

Next - Digital painting 18 x 18 in.

Mina Moe, an American artist, graduated from UCLA with a major in Economics and has since worked in the finance and data science sectors. During her high school years, she was deeply fascinated by the connections between art, mathematics, science, and economics. Since then, her artworks have been influenced by elements from all four domains.

In August 2023, her passion for art led her to launch Kasine Studio based in California. Her artworks have received awards, are part of private collections, and have been featured in domestic and international exhibitions and publications.

Little Hope - Digital painting 18 x 18 in.
Blissful Mundane - Digital painting 11 x 11 in.
Surreal - Digital painting 18 x 18 in.
Where - Digital painting 18 x 18 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Shu Yu

We Are Used To Giving Meaning To Things - Digital media 67 x 36 cm

2017, Awarded in the 2017 American Art Awards, juried by America’s 25 Best Galleries & Museums (category 47, digital art – representational).

2018, Won the 1st place in the 28th latest Artavita Online Contest in the category of Digital Art.

2018, Became a 4X winner in the 2018 American Art Awards. Won the 1st place in both “Orientalism or Asian” subject and “digital art – representational” subject; Won the 4th place in futurism; Won the 6th place in surrealism. 

2019,Won the contest Finalist Award exhibited in San Diego of  Unite state.

2019,Artworks were published on spotlight contemporary art magazine in 2019. 

2019Was selected as one of the artist in the information of Contest Finalists, exhibition at spectrum Miami.  

2019,  Was invited to participate in the 12 th Florence Biennale of Italian  in 2019. 

2019 Was selected in the ArtGemini Prize, London& Singapore (London  Global Art Prize). 

2019 ,Was invited to participate in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Culture and Art Exhibition. 

2019 ,In 2019 American Art Awards, won 8 prize  and 1 masterpieces prize by the committee.

2019 , won the 1st prize in the Circle Quarterly art magazine art awards, artworks were published on the circle foundation art magazine for free.

2020 Was selected in the SCA2020  (Society of Canadian) International Open Juried Online Exhibition

Double Trouble - Digital media 124 x 160 cm
Look at Here - Digital media 180 x 166 cm
Temptation of Summer - Digital media 120 x 92 cm
Ah Ah Ah - Digital media 160 x 151 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Daniella Batsheva

Born in: 1989, Philadelphia, PA
Lives in: Between US, UK, and Israel
Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration from The University of the Arts, Philadelphia, PA.
Describe your art in 3 words: haunting, spicy, magical
See More Work: daniellabatsheva.com

Sleep Paralysis - Ink, coloured pencil, tipex on found object, 9x12 in. (SOLD)

Daniella Batsheva is a self-proclaimed “Illustrator with a design habit” whose aesthetic straddles the line between underground fine art and the mainstream. Her work has been displayed in numerous galleries such as The Hive Gallery, Gabba Gallery, Art Expo NY, and her most recent solo exhibition, "Skirting Spectres" at the Crypt Gallery. She has illustrated for Paris Jackson, Kerrang!, Revolve Agency, Pizza Girl, and drawn numerous show posters, which have become well-known in London.

What themes does your current work involve?
The themes often involve a blend of urban legends, symbolism from many different cultures, and femininity. The stylistic approach is a fusion between retro punk show posters and children's book illustration with a heavy Victorian flair. Being commissioned to illustrate pieces with completely different topics ends up being tons of fun because I get to process the subject matter through that mental lens. Lately I've been including a lot more humour in my pieces which adds a more relatable, human element that's received a lot of positive responses.
Describe your creative process.
My process is extremely traditional and it always starts with a massive amount of research. Depending on the topic, I might head to a library. Then lots of thumbnailing and sketching. Once I find the right imagery and composition, I roughly draw out the full-sized piece on bristol. This is where my friends say I'm a grandpa - I'll pull out tracing paper, redraw and refine certain elements, and transfer it to the paper, so everything is ready for me to begin inking. Sometimes I'll keep a drawing black and white, other times I'll scan it in and colour it digitally. Most of my work is commissioned, so the client usually only requires a file and I get to stash away the original like a happy little gremlin.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I've always felt obsessively compelled to make art. It was my chosen method of communication as an awkward child. I tell people that it's really all I know how to do! These days, I find myself drawing more in defiance of the alarming trends towards AI and the devaluation of artists, but my creations are mostly out of love and a need for mental clarity. My work is heavily influenced by illuminated manuscripts, Victorian era children's books, and horror films. I love taking the naivete and innocence of early illustrations and pairing it with a modern narrative. I generally choose to not rely on a shock-factor or fan-art. I want people to appreciate the artwork, not for its gore or nudity, but for its quality, character, and symbolism.
What are your goals and plans as an artist in 2023?
I'm currently working on an exhibition called "Skirting Spectres" with my friend Susan Slaughter (Ghost Hunters Int., Paranormal Caught on Camera). It's a week long supernatural pop-up show that's taking place at The Crypt Gallery in London from April 25-30. There will be never before seen illustrations on display, along with accompanying stories, lectures, a Q&A session with Susan and I, and live drawing sessions on the weekdays. I also have artwork on display at ArtExpo New York this weekend. I'm continuing to work with my clients, both as an illustrator and designer. Other than that, I'm trying to spend as much time in nature as possible. There's nothing I love more than walking around in the park or woods on a gloomy day.
How do recent advancements in technology affect your art practice? How may recent developments in Artificial Intelligence (image generator software) affect the definition of fine art?
AI hasn't affected my work on a personal level, but seeing artists attacked as "unnessecary" or "gatekeepers" is gaslighting of the worst degree. Artists are not privileged and we are not gatekeeping anything. Anyone is free to put in the work and develop the skills necessary to become an artist. Museums, galleries are free, and you can absolutely find tutorials on youtube. Scraping the internet and using the art of hard working people to create a database that generates derivative images is an insult to any skilled worker that has dedicated their lives to honing their skills. It's simply laziness. We have a culture of convenience and a need for instant gratification due to being perpetually connected to our gadgets and receiving an onslaught of information. We need to touch grass.
What is the role of the artist today?
I think the role is evolving. Artists have always defined their environments through fashion, product design, paintings, iconic imagery and logos, and I think that will continue to be true. However, we're in a place where technology is rapidly progressing, in an attempt to replace artists and, while I don't think it threatens the will to create, public perception of the arts appears to be at an all-time low. People are forgetting why art is important, schools are cutting funding to their arts programs, art is being politicised as something "liberal" rather than something human, and it's all very alarming. I think, as Henry Rollins said, "This is not a time to be dismayed. This is punk rock time." And maybe, right now, artists need to remind people how to be rebellious, critical thinkers.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
A good piece involves striking a balance between skill and cleverness. A piece that is entirely skill, for example, a drawing that is photorealistic but drawn from an existing image, can be impressive, but that's all it is. A piece that has a brilliant concept, but is poorly executed, also misses the mark. Good art is able to communicate a message while being visually appealing in some way. Great artwork should capture the imagination of the viewer and hold it, inspire some emotion, keep them searching, or simply give them a new environment to inhabit for a moment. Great artwork should have a versatility to it. It should be able to be applied in a context outside of visual arts so that it can be enjoyed beyond a specific, exclusive place and the viewer can develop a relationship with it.
Pierrette (Fangoria Exclusive) - Ink and digital colouring, 11x14 in. $20 print
Martyr - Ink, coloured pencil, tipex on found object, 9x12 in. $300
Storming the Gates - Ink on bristol, 11x14 in. $900
Beatrix Potter - Ink, coloured pencil, tipex on found object, 9x12 in. $300

This is the time for artists to create a space for each other, outside of a digital umbrella. We're trendsetters, we're hard workers, and I think we're generally very interesting people. I suspect that if we build that community and space physically for each other, it'll inspire others to follow. Or maybe I'm just being idealistic and people really don't have the will to challenge the status quo. I think we're at an interesting social turning point and we have yet to see where it goes. I'm gonna stick around for the ride and if art becomes disliked, for whatever reason, I'll keep drawing out of spite.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Anson Liaw

“I feel I am useless as an artist when I am happy. Pain is what creates my artwork. The painful experiences that people go through as they journey through life in the world around us from childhood to adulthood which in many ways is full of chaos and hardship are what sparks and motivates me to possess my objectives to make purposeful artwork that hopefully generates meaningful and fulfilling empathetic connections to people. As I observe and interpret the world around me combined with creating my artwork, I discover time and time again that true beauty lies within the darkness and that sometimes nightmares are the birthplace of some of the best ideas for an artist.”

Preserving and Cultivating Peace - Chalk Pastels on Archival BFK Rives Printmaking and Drawing Paper 20 x 20 in. $1,200

Anson Liaw is an accomplished illustrator based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Upon graduating from the Communication & Design Department's Design Advertising Program at the Ontario College of Art (now OCAD University), his illustrations have become an integral part of numerous projects, spanning magazines, book publications, corporate communications, packaging, and advertising.

Anson’s illustrations embody a critical viewpoint, addressing a wide spectrum of subjects, including social, political, cultural issues, and lifestyle matters.

Drawing inspiration from everyday life, personal memories, and imagination, he skillfully combines various elements to construct new and unexpected meanings. His work sparks discussions, encouraging viewers to engage, appreciate, and discover something new about the world every day.

Anson’s talent has garnered recognition and accolades from prestigious organizations such as American Illustration, the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles (SILA), Applied Arts Magazine, and 3x3, The Magazine of Contemporary Illustration, among others. His illustrations have been featured in renowned publications and exhibitions worldwide, including Luerzer’s Archive and "Illustration: A Theoretical and Contextual Perspective," Third Edition by Alan Male (Author), Bloomsbury Visual Arts in the United Kingdom.

Throughout his career, Anson has collaborated with a diverse range of clients, including Time Magazine, McDonald’s, The New York Times, Nestle, and The National Ballet of Canada, to name a few. Additionally, he shares his love and passion for the arts by teaching at OCAD University and Virtute Innovation Academy in Canada, nurturing the next generation of creative minds.

Giving Peace a Chance Day and Night Everyday (version 3) - Pencil, ink and digital, 28 x 40 in.
Dreams to Reality - Pencil, ink and digital 16 x 24 in.
Cold War, The Storm Before The Calm (Version 3) - 16 x 22 in.
Down But Not Out - Chalk pastels and compressed charcoal on archival print-making and drawing paper 20 x 30 in.
Abdul Khaliq, The Flying Bird of Asia - Pencil, ink and digital 21 x 28 in.
Cut Now and Forever, Women Life Freedom (version 4) - 23.4 x 33 in.
Journey - Chalk pastels, ink, Conte and charcoal drawing sticks and pencils on archival print-making and drawing paper 20 x 30 in.
Before the Rose (Version 2) - Pencil, ink and digital 16 x 20 in.
Mercatto - Ink on paper 16 x 20 in.
Méliès' Magical Illusions - Pencil, ink and digital 35 x 46 in.
Blue Christmas - Pencil, ink and digital, 24 x 31 in.
Destiny (Version 2) - Pencil, ink and digital 12 x 15 in.
Blues Vocalist - Chalk pastels on archival print-making and drawing paper 22 x 26 in.
Silent No More - Pencil, ink and digital 18 x 24 in.
H2O 4 ALL Winter Holiday - Pencil, ink and digital 16 x 22 in.
Inseparable Separate Ways (version 2) - Pencil, ink and digital, 22 x 30 in.
My Sun Shower Goddess - Chalk pastels, Conte and charcoal drawing sticks & pencils on archival print-making & drawing paper 18 x 21 in.
Youthful Ideas for Healing the Earth - Chalk pastels on archival print-making & drawing paper 20 x 30 in.
The Cycling Utopia (version 4) - Pencil, ink and digital 15 x 21 in.
Lifelessly Living - Pencil, ink and digital 30 x 40 in.
A Cohesive Whole, Harmonious Co-Existence (version 2) - Pencil, ink and digital, 30 x 42 in.
Part of Us (Version 3) - Pencil, ink and digital 12.5 x 21 in.
Her Time in the Sun - Chalk pastels on archival print-making and drawing paper 20 x 24 in.
A Partridge in a Pear Tree (version 3) - Pencil, ink and digital 12 x 21 in.
Our Children are Our Future - Pencil, ink and digital 20 x 28 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Shan Ogdemli

"My work is inspired by light and color, patterns from biology, physics and geometry, by the Earth and Cosmos, by the interconnectedness of all things, by op art, pop art and the miracle of life."

Pink Moon - Acrylic & diatomaceous earth on canvas 37 x 48 in.

"I have been a working artist my entire life, wearing many hats that include fine artist, licensed artist, illustrator, product designer, graphic designer, creative director and entrepreneur. I've owned and co-owned several successful artistic business endeavors, including my graphic design and illustration studio, Ogdemli Feldman Design + Illustration; my art licensing business, Designs by Shan; and a worldwide licensed brand phenomenon called Pampered Girls. 

After many years working in the commercial art and design fields in Los Angeles, my husband and I have recently relocated to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and I have finally been able to make the necessary life changes to be able to focus full-time on my true passion of creating my fine art. 

I work in multiple styles and media that include large-scale paintings in acrylic mixed with diatomaceous earth, as well as in digital media. My acrylic paintings are heavily textured with expressive brush strokes that add movement and energy, with color harmonies meticulously built from several layers of translucent and opaque paint. 

My digital images are what I call "digital drawings" because they all start as pencil drawings on paper, which are then scanned and redrawn by hand in Illustrator, then meticulously colored using Illustrator and Photoshop in much the same way as my layered acrylic paintings. 

My subjects in both media include light and color, patterns from life, science and math, dots, spots, circles, particles, waves, energy, flowing lines, spirals, mandalas and abstract landscapes. 

Inspirations include Op Art of the '60s and 70's, Victor Vasarely, Yaakov Agam, Mark Rothko, Vincent Van Gogh, Emilio Pucci, Alan Turing, biology, geometry, astronomy, physics, quantum physics and metaphysics."

Sea Spots - Digital media, Giglée print on stretched canvas 28 x 28 in.
Moana Kala Kala - Digital media, Giglée print on stretched canvas 28 x 28 in.
Rose Nebula - Acrylic & diatomaceous earth on canvas 54 x 54 in.
Blue Sunflower - Acrylic & diatomaceous earth on canvas 60 x 60 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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