Amir Chodorov

"Being a photographer for me is a kind of creation. Every object exists out there for a long time but my goal is to bring the beauty, power, and something that "on the way" you were never going to see - what I call - 'to create narrative beyond the lens'.”

Ground Zero Station

Israeli photographer, Amir Chodorov has been shooting for more than 40 years. In his work, he deals with categories and in the last years, he has been focusing on special panoramas utilizing special techniques that he has created especially for shooting in challenging places.

According to Chodorov, "In a world where everybody has a cell phone camera and almost 2 billion pictures are taken every single day, I am not satisfied with one and simple picture only. When we are looking at an urban scene, we see more than one frame at a time and I wanted to make sure that my work captures that moment and keeps it alive. I am using a special technique where I combine 40 to 500 frames in one photograph."

"I try to encapsulate the full story of places and objects surrounding us and I am also trying to create excitement for the observer. The inspiration for my technique also came by studying the work of the great masters of the Renaissance and later, such as Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, and others who created large works of art that could be observed for hours, where we could always find new elements and details constantly."

"The purpose of my art is achieved when I manage to create an emotional impact and a reflection between people and the reality around them,” explains Chodorov. 

Roosevelt Island
Time Square
Jerusalem Old City
Brooklyn Bridge

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Angela Keller

“My painting is about passion and the freedom of experiment, in search of the poetic, surreal and ironic essence where nothing is impossible.”

A New Planet - Oil on linen 90 x 90 cm

Angela Keller grew up in Switzerland and followed an eclectic career as paleontologist, psychotherapist, and painter. She took lessons in drawing and painting at the School of Arts at the University in Bern. From 1999 to the present day, Angela has exhibited her works in numerous international art shows.

Angela creates experimental, playful artwork with hints of dreams, fantasy, and charm. Her paintings fluctuate between surrealism and symbolism; they are dreamy, otherworldly, and lyrical in their balance between fantasy and reality. Angela’s paintings depict imaginative imagery while also incorporating certain realistic elements, such as the hills of Kabul, the coast of Portugal or the villages in Calabria, in Southern Italy, where Angela currently lives and wor

Rocking Horse in Transit - Oil on linen 90 x 90 cm
Metamorphosis - Oil on linen 60 x 83 cm
First Coffee in the Morning - Oil on linen 90 x 90 cm
Heading to the Fiesta - Oil on linen 60 x 83 cm

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Nadi Adatepe

"My art is the story of everything I have been through in life, and how I perceive everything that has happened, and events surrounding me. Through my work, I portray personal experiences and perceptions."

Africa In My Window - Gazelle - Digital media 40 x 50 cm

Born in Istanbul in 1966 and living in Norway since 1990, Nadi Adatepe is a self-taught digital artist, based in Oslo. He has been developing his skills primarily creating digital art with fractal software for several years. Adatepe's art is the story of everything he has been through in life and how he perceives these experiences as well as events surrounding him.

His journey to become a visual artist is a result of unsuccessful attempts to express himself through poetry writing and music composing. His interest in creating art from fractals springs from his belief that nothing exists in the way we perceive it and everything which exists, or existence itself can be confirmed based on the repetition of the smallest particles, simples shapes, fractals. This mindset, which is the driving force behind his visual art has been crucial to the content and context of his work.

For Adatepe, the most important thing is to think outside the box, to explore the boundaries of the generally accepted and those that fall outside. In his own words,  "It's all about trying to describe things, in a way we haven't faced before!"

Adatepe has developed a technique he calls “mutual conception”, based on fractal art in the last two years, after experimenting with a variety of styles. His biggest passion is offering people a new way of looking at things but that doesn't mean that the way he perceives them is the same as others. That's not the point for him either. Instead, he aims for the work to speak to each viewer individually and give a personal experience and interpretation; "because all people are unique it will be natural that what others see is different, especially for those who have an open mind and are curious about new ideas..."


“Nadi Adatepe's digital works are very well balanced and unique. They reveal a distinctive style and the artist employs a technique he developed over the years using fractal software. Although abstract, the pieces have deep content attached to them which the artist leaves open to each viewer's personal interpretation. Adatepe's goal is to bring to focus the relativity of attaching meaning and carry through a message of free, subversive thinking. His digital abstract realms function as a recommendation on the equal importance of a multiplicity of interpretations. The complex and often labyrinthic compositions have an intense rhythm that captures our gaze.When confronted with one of Adatepe's work it becomes quickly evident that the piece is loaded with content and it may require long hours of looking to take in the full spectrum of each conception.” - Circle Foundation of the Arts, Director

Africa In My Window - Digital media 40 x 50 cm
The Look IV - Digital media 40 x 50 cm
Africa In My Window - Storks - Digital media 40 x 50 cm
The Look III - Digital media 40 x 50 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Mimi Revencu

Mimi developed her technique and distinctive elements with the confidence of someone who feels she has a calling, not just a plan. She uses her instincts and experiences to develop sophisticated narratives that express authentic joy and at a closer look, hide symbols and secrets.

Nice Dreams - Acrylic on canvas 60 x 50 cm

Mimi’s art is instinctive. Her paintings tell stories inspired by everyday experiences and moments, expressed through the language of her inner world. Their symbolism comes from a place within her and they are influenced by Eastern European mysteries, fairy tales and patterns. In telling her stories, she’s always searching for sincerity and for that raw emotion and joy we are all born with but tend to lose as we become adults.

A mirabilis artist, Mimi’s art is positive and radiates only good energy. And if you look at each of the stories she tells on canvas, you’ll always find a secret, and perhaps that secret is the key to rediscovering something genuine and true about yourself.

Mimi Revencu’s first love for art started through her father’s drawings. She painted and made drawings herself throughout her youth, but it wasn’t until much later that she decided to devote her life entirely to art.

She was guided in her formative years by the Romanian Master Petru Petrescu who recognized her natural talent and unique style. Mimi Revencu’s works mainly in acrylic and with mixed media. Her art has been seen in numerous exhibitions throughout Europe and are part of private collections all around the world.

Ethno Secession - Acrylic on canvas 45 x 55 cm
The Haunted Castle - Acrylic on canvas 60 x 80 cm
Ortansa - Mixed media 60 x 80 cm
A Flight - Acrylic on canvas 50 x 60 cm

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Adrienne Walker Hoard

"I believe I came into being as an artist to translate visual stories. In photographs or shaped linen, in glass or gemstone, poems of myth and daily legends, all become my colored forms. My personal vision is a creative composite from my years of lived experience as a member of the global community."

Maria, Adorned as A Mother of Sons - Color photograph 18 x 24 in.

Adrienne Walker Hoard is an artist, photographer and design educator. Dr. Hoard is a former Fulbright Scholar to South Korea teaching in Seoul at Ehwa Women’s University and Hong Ik University. As a Research Fellow to South Africa, Dr. Hoard taught at University of South Africa in Pretoria and the University of the Western Cape in Cape Town. Her international research in color and design resulted in distinct course work utilizing principles from NOTAN as a vehicle for developing self-awareness of internal responses to balance in the creative process. Having lived in Italy as a painter, her sensitivity to light and contrast is evident in her superb color-mixing. Dr. Hoard's art is housed in museums and private collections in Europe, Asia and the Americas.


“With an impressive academic record and a multifaceted professional experience, Adrienne Walker Hoard produces work that is sincere and compelling. Her practice involves pure documentary photography as well as photographic portraits which the artist creatively overlays with hand-painted colored shapes and motifs. Her subjects often include tribal men and women which she captured during her extensive travels and stays abroad. They document the life and everyday activities and rituals in the communities she observed and became a part of. Particularly mesmerizing are the beautiful traditional clothes and embellishments they wear.

Hoard's photographs are vibrant, capture the character of the sitter as well as manage to carry through the specific sentiment of the moment. The hand-painted motifs render each print unique and one-of-a-kind and add to the contextual aspects of the portrait by attaching more information both about the depicted as well as about the artist. The added colors and textures may speak to the customs of each tribe but may also be seen as a ritual itself performed by the artist as a process of capturing and communicating the aura of each persona.”  - Circle Foundation of the Arts, Director

Spirit Mask Series: Woman of Two Waters - Hand-painted photograph 13 x 15 in.
Lettie Masilela, Portrait - Black & White photograph 16 x 20 in.
Spirit Mask Series: Feathered Intruder - Hand-Painted photograph 13 x 15 in.
Mr. Ndimande, An Inyanga - Color photograph 16 x 20 in.

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Christine Alfery

Born in: 1947, USA

Lives in: USA

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Conceptual, experimental, natural

See More Work:  www.christinealfery.com

Rolling Stones

Describe your creative process.
I had a professor once who told me that I need to be in the studio every day and work on art every day. I took his advice to heart and have constantly tried to work in the studio every day. I also believe that one needs to struggle in order to find success and this same professor said to me, to be a great artist, you need to get out of your comfort zone. The struggle is important. I am in the studio every day - beginning. continuing on, and ending works of art.
What influences your work? What inspires you?
Two concepts, freedom and individuality are tucked within in my work “Rolling Stones.” There are no two identical ways artwork can be viewed. There is no right or wrong when viewing artwork our minds need to be as open as a child’s, playing with colorful building blocks or choosing colors from a box of crayons filled with possibilities.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
"art." What is good art? Can one see the artist's hand in the work - can one see the artist in the work - not what others think is good art - instead "good" art should reflect the uniqueness, one-of-a-kindness, individuality and freedom the artist has and their work needs to reflect all of those things. Too many times all of the above is missing in what is today called "art. "
What is the role of the artist today?
It is hard to be an artist; it would have been easier being a lawyer or physician. I have tried to give it up but I am only at home when I am creating, discovering, exploring, inventing. Those things are the role of the artist today and it is not easy.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


affi

Stephanie Holznecht

Born in: 1959, England

Lives in: Janesville, WI USA

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Emotional, inspirational, provoking

See More Work: https://www.sholznecht.com/

Golden Dragon - Acrylic, tempera and latex paint on canvas 36 x 24 in.

"I invest in the creation of a piece of art to convey what I have inside: my thinking, my emotions, my life, my essence and my soul. The inspiration that I take from experiencing life creates a feeling that continues to inspire me. I don't think, as an artist, that is something I will never lose."

What themes does your work involve?
My artwork is an emotional journey inside my mind. Expressed as abstract art, it embodies what I am thinking and feeling.
Describe your creative process.
The process I use for creating my artwork style is by taking various sizes of squeegees and scrapers that are used to move paint splashes around the canvas, and add more paint if it is necessary. I choose my colors based on my mood at the time. I move the paint in the same way. Happy brings bright colors and loose, playful movement. Sad and angry moods bring colors reflecting those feelings, and the movement of the paint is more frantic and wild. A piece is finished when I can feel the title.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I began drawing when I was very young. I could copy a photograph of an animal exactly as it appeared by the age of eleven. From that moment on I knew I wanted to be an artist. I took this seriously by the time I reached high school. I make art for myself. Even if a person commissions a piece in particular colors and look, I still create that piece for me. I am inspired by everyone and everything and take my inspiration from the emotions and feelings I get from them.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think a great piece of artwork tells a story. Whether it is realistic or abstract, it should take the observer on a journey. A look into the artist's thought process while creating it. Whether it be the story of a face, flower, geometric shape, loose abstract or a landscape; everything delves into the heart of the creator and helps describe the painting, photograph, sculpture, mixed media, needlepoint, quilt, etc. I believe a great piece of art is truly in the eyes of the beholder.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because that has always been my calling. I chose to dedicate myself to art because I love it so much. I originally chose the practical side of artist as a graphic designer and art director. For an artist today it is the safest position to take, if your abilities allow you this great fortune. It is also where an artist can have a loud voice. As a professional artist life is much harder to make yourself heard. Getting out there and marketing your style is a never-ending quest.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Newton Rocha

Born in: 1968, Brazil

Lives in: Jaboatão dos Guararapes, Pernambuco, Brazil

Media: Painting, Mixed media

Describe your work in 3 words: Genuine, Innovative, Creative

See More Work:  http://www.newtonrocha.com.br

The Black Butterfly Found The Black Flower - Mixed Media on canvas 50 x 70 cm

"During my research as an artist, my main focus was to find my own formula. That happened when I randomly glued strings on the canvas to 'interlineate' my artwork, resulting in a pure implied sense of figure. I also developed PuzzleArt & 4D, a technique that could revolutionize the visual art world."

What themes does your work involve?
I have no idea what will happen after the creation process (application of the strings). At this stage, I only care about the special composition of the canvas. However, in the end, I always perceive subjects, such as fauna, flora and people as implied sense, and some natural events.
Describe your creative process.
By gluing randomly strings to delineate I realized, the strings gave me the freedom to create implied sense figures subconsciously. After applying the strings on the canvas, I see the result of creation from all angles, so I work on them. In creating this technique, I realized, it solves the big issue known as blank canvas by themselves because each figure gets its own space in its self-creation resulting in an interesting game of interpretations by viewers. Also, I draw figures using collages.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My artwork is automatically influenced by the program in my subconscious at the moment of creation, the spontaneous movements at that moment are the inspiration itself. The result is my personal fulfillment. That's why I make art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?

Good art is one made with responsibility, seriousness, intelligence and honesty in relation to aesthetics and ethics. The artist who is original and meets the above prerogatives, he will make an excellent artwork.

“If anything can be considered art, then art is no longer relevant.”  - Roger Scruton.

What is the role of the artist today?
For me, Art is an intelligent creative entity. The artist's role is to channel the needs that this entity wants to transmit at that moment in each artist, forming a collective conscience among artists according to the current needs. That's how trends are born. That intelligent creative entity picked me up and I loved because I feel fulfilled with each artwork done. Art is aesthetics, aesthetics is beauty and beauty is love. That's how it should function ... always.


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Maksim Mezhuritsky

Born in: 1974, Ukraine

Lives in: Or Akiva, Israel

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: True, Emotional, Created with interest

See More Work:  https://www.artmajeur.com/en/mezhuritsky/artworks/galleries

La Comedy Di Clown #14 - Pastel on Paper 30 x 20 cm

"Art creates this world. Art makes the world a better place."

What themes does your work involve?
Man's inner world and his relationship with the surrounding reality.
Describe your creative process.
Ideas, often surrealistic shape my art. I reveal each idea in a series of artworks.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My inner world, some works of art that I love, the outer world that affects my inner world. I make art because I love it.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Creativity makes an artwork good, but depth of creativity makes it great.
What is the role of the artist today?
The same, as for example in the days of Michelangelo; to inspire the world.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Renate Merzinger-Pleban

Born in: 1942, Vienna, Austria

Lives in: Pressbaum, Austria

Media: Painting, Photography, Illustration, Watercolor, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Landscape is everywhere

See More Work:  Austria Forum   http://www.kulturvernetzung.at  www.merzinger-pleban-verlag.at

Black Trees - Acrylic on paper 65 x 50 cm

"Lines and strokes by pencil or brush produce form, space, motion.
They give clear significance by strength and colour and also by letting blank the paper. Every stimulation comes from outside. As an answer to it my drawing and painting create the world outside new."

What themes does your work involve?
Landscape is everywhere, there does not exist no landscape. You only may fade it in favour of something in a certain moment subjectively important and interesting. For me landscape is a synonym for nature and nature is a synonym for indifference. Since ever nature makes me feel delivered because of its arbitrariness and fascinated because of its beauty. So the landscape is the favorite theme of my work as an artist.
Describe your creative process.
Looking around I always see landscapes (because there does not exist no landscape). Again and again I am fascinated and that's the beginning of a new work. I create lines and colours in order to work out all - for me - most important characteristics, till the moment the picture "tells" me: enough, well done or failed. Sometimes it seems more difficult to end working on a picture than to begin with it. There is nearly no possibility to correct the result of painting or/and drawing.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Working as an artist is a matter of dealing with the world around me. I have to find my position and - possibly - get echo. In my work I reduce nature to landscape. So it becomes concrete - maybe harmless - and a place of desire where emotion and thoughts may find a place to stay a while. My works show my highly personal view of a landscape - always without contradiction: nature never replies.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Art is good or it is not art. Producing art and also "consuming" art is a very individual process and that is OK in my opinion. It is probably the last important and completely free area for human beings to decide whether art is art or not. What makes a piece of art great for a certain person depends on his/her individual touchability and sensitivity. Apart from this: persons who have a high interest in art mostly make the same decisions regarding art.
What is the role of the artist today?
It is very simple: I am an artist because there is nothing that interests me permanently so much as fine art. The role of - any kind of - artists was and is: to take a very personal look at the world to show (express) this access to the world using his/her medium and offer others to share it. But necessarily without any force or compulsion - art is free! There is a general right of interest and also of no interest.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist