Aomi Kikuchi

"I am an artist who earnestly learns various knowledge and techniques of textiles, digests them, and takes a unique approach to conventional thinking and methods for creating innovative works."

Shape of Mind - Drawing, Gold Sumi Ink, Canvas 7.62 cm square each

Aomi Kikuchi is a textile artist based in Kyoto, Japan. She holds a BFA from Kyoto University of Art & Design (Japan) and an MFA from Pratt Institute (USA) and is currently an artist in residence at the Textile Arts Center (USA). Aomi has exhibited her work throughout the world including at Today’s Silk Road Exhibition (China), LA Art Show Modern + Contemporary (California), and the annual Japan Contemporary Art and Craft Exhibition (Tokyo Metropolitan Museum).

With over 30 years of practice, Aomi has dedicated extensive and immersive practice to Japanese Kimono Haute Couture, Yusen dyeing techniques, and silk fabrics after becoming a fashion designer. This background inspires her artistic exploration and her artwork utilizes various textile materials and techniques including extremely thin fibers, goose down, and cotton flower along with knitting, weaving, embroidery, and other craft techniques.

Aomi’s figurative dyeing, textile installation, and soft sculptures exemplify her intentional selection of materials that are defined by delicacy and brittleness. With this, she aims to express Buddha's philosophy of impermanence, insubstantiality and suffering of all life. Aomi is currently working on a series of large scale installation pieces and sculptures that explore impermanence through the use of biology and nature with textiles. This new work will be on view at the Textile Arts Center in Fall 2020.

 

Chasm - Original Dye Method inspired by Traditional Japanese Yuzen Kimono Dyeing, Layered Silk Organza, Acid dye, Pigment 90 cm square
Transition - Knitting, Embroidery, Linen Yarn, Silk Thread, Goose Down 208 x 218 cm
Female Mosquito - Embroidery, Painting, Silk Gauze, Wire, Pigment, Cotton, Bamboo Hoop 16 cm round
Trace - Embroidery, Silk Thread, Goose, Down, Cotton 68 x 28 cm

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Annukka

"I use recyclable materials and turn them into new stories through painting, drawing, sewing, weaving and embroidering. We are able to feel the memories and stories of past lives that have been lived through recycled materials."

The glass bead game, Triptych (Lasihelmipeli), 2020 - Weaving, painting, sewing, ready made - 212 x 4 x 110 cm Photo by Usva Torkki

The art as a way of expressing yourself

"I develop diary-like textile pieces from materials that are inherited, or already existing pieces from my previous textile experiments and scattered paintings, recycled textiles, cutting boards, driftwoods, stones and shellfish shells. I use recyclable materials and turn them into new stories through weaving, sewing and embroidering. We are able to feel the memories and stories of past lives that have been lived through recycled materials."

Annukka is a Finnish artist, born in 1960 and living in Espoo. She holds degrees in Pedagogy for Visual Arts and Textile arts and Design.

A & Omame, Triptych 2018-20 - Textile/oil painting & pastels, sewing, ready made - 120 x 8 x 110 cm
Still life: The end of the play (Leikinloppu), 2011-2020 - Painting, sewing, ready made - 53 x 15 x 87 cm
Shelter from the Wind (Tuulensuoja)
A ( A & Omame, Triptych 2018-20), The flour sieve with embroidery - Ready made - 21 x 8 x 35 cm

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Aneesha Parrone

“In our life, there is a single color, as on an artist's palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love.” - Marc Chagall

"My work is an expression of my intuition. Nature inspires with her vast panorama of diversity."

Window of Opportunity - Tapestry weaving 14 x 12 in.

American Artist, Aneesha Parrone has been a weaver and fiber artist since 1977 when she was selected by the North Carolina Arts Council as a Third Century Artist. Aneesha further studied Weaving at Barton College.

"From the beginning, weaving has been intuitive. Inspiration, for me, is not defined within the parameters of fibers or even the visual arts. I began to experiment with pulling warp threads and embellishing with such materials as sandstone, copper screen, gemstones."

She began to exhibit throughout the state of N. Caroline and nationally and then internationally, expressing a unique style that reflected on her natural surroundings.

"I find my own tapestries connect in an internal dialog as well as with the world of nature and the viewer. My work is a visceral expression of my inspirations."

Her piece, "The Door of Refuge" was published in Best of NC Artists and Artisans, 2006. In addition, two pieces,  "Fallen Angels" and "Waterfall Retreat" were selected for the book Best in America Artists and Artisans, Mixed Media, 2007. “Converging Conversations,” “Door” and “Window of Opportunity” were selected for publication in Best of Worldwide Mixed Media, 2012. Aneesha was selected as a participating artist in the Florence Biennial.

She has learned from master weavers, participated in visual arts programs offered by internationally acclaimed visual and performing artists.

"I have learned the art of raku pottery from Toshio Ohi, 11th generation potter from Japan; puppetry from Hoby Ford, student of Jim Henson; participated in Shakespearean workshops from the NC Shakespeare Festival. I was also selected to serve as educator/coordinator for the international project sponsored by NHK TV/Japan: "Superteacher, James Turell." The integrity of excellence these artists live is integrated into each of my works of art; thus, the essence of all my experiences are woven into my tapestries and writing."

Door of Refuge - Tapestry weaving 24 x 28 in.
Window of Opportunity - Tapestry weaving 14 x 12 in.
Planting Seeds - Tapestry weaving 10 x 12 in.
Door of Refuge - Tapestry weaving 24 x 28 in.

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Cristina Corvino

"In the past two years, my production has focused on the creation of a number of works from the "Time Machines" series that investigate the social role of women throughout history, these works belong to the style of Conservative Art, a term coined with a registered trademark."

Nonnità - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm

Italian artist, Cristina Corvino attended the Liceo Artistico Renato Cottini as a pupil of Antonio Carena, an established painter known for the "Heavens", and of the designer Giorgio Ceretti, known for the creation of the "Pratone" sofa. The teachings of these masters gave Corvino an aptitude for research and a passion for art that will grow and become expressed in a variety of visual languages: painting, installations, fashion, theater; experimentations which over time will give life to mixed media series of works, independent of the will of the client.

With a Degree in Architecture and a career as architect and restorer, Cristina Corvino continues her artistic activity in parallel. In some cases inserted as an integral part of the workspace and in other cases as a continuous comparison with ancient works and various executive techniques.

#Io Resto a Casa - Oleographic printing and mixed media 56 x 70 cm
Rinominata COVID19 in Italy - Mixed media 112 x 140 cm
Creazione - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm
Rinominata Distanziamento Sociale - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm

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Bernd Reichert

"I have always been interested in surrealist art and magic realism. The figurative aspect is important there. Coming from printmaking, I started out with using existing imagery, but more and more I have been combining collages with painted elements up to the point where the painting takes full control."

La Belle Machiniste - Acrylic and collage 70 x 70 cm

“I was born behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany. I am now living on the surreal shores of Belgium. I studied printmaking in Germany (Berlin, Magdeburg) and Ireland. After many years of producing limited edition prints in all forms, I stopped for a few years my art production and traveled the world extensively. Now I have moved my area of interest to collages and paintings. I like to see myself as a kind of surrealist artist in the tradition of Leonor Fini, Eileen Agar and the likes.

My collages are a juxtaposition of elements, images, and objects incoherent to each other, thereby exercising a de-contextualizing form of violence on language and image alike. They contain a kind of strangeness, a disturbing element disquieting the spectator/reader who is confronted with a series of elements taken from one's everyday life which, being put one next to each other, provoke, suddenly, an incoherent situation, a source of obscurity and vagueness. Working with text and images, I like to encourage the viewer to oscillate between reading and looking. It is about reusing, recycling and re-contextualizing the over-abundance of images and information we can choose from Time, the various cultural influences of the placed I traveled to and a Babel-like plethora of different languages are recurring aspects of my work.

The artwork is telling stories, influenced by my travels, but also often containing autobiographical elements."

 

Select Solo Exhibitions

Gallery Kaire-Desine, Vilnius (LT), 2005

Gallery Meno, Cultural Centre Jonava (LT) , 2005

Musée de l’Art Spontané, Brussels (BE), 2008

Gallery 89, London (UK), 2010

Kunstwerkstatt, Magdeburg (GE), 2010 and 2013

Gallery ORT, Birmingham (UK), 2012

Cultural Centre, Minden (GE), 2014

L’Apparition - Acrylic and collage 70 x 70 cm
Merz N°2 - Collage 15 x 10 cm
Waiting - Acrylic 70 x 70 cm
Heize Elektrisch! - Collage 30 x 21 cm

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Brigitte Kratochwill

"When I paint I embark on a journey into my subconscious. I integrate sensory experiences into the painting process. What emerges is a confrontation with something like a reflection of my soul. I search for suitable forms, structures, colours, hues/shades, and sensitive surfaces."

Verstecktes Juwel (Hidden Jewel) - Mixed Media on paper 21 x 29 cm

Austrian Artist, Brigitte Kratochwill was a music, art, and German language teacher in Salzburg until 1999. She led art projects for various institutions and became Headmistress of the Secondary Modern School Bürmoos, Salzburg (1999-2013). Kratochwill actively exhibits since 1988 in  Austria, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Portugal, Switzerland, Luxembourg, France, Great Britain, Czech Republic, South Africa, Spain, Finland and China including at the Galerie Artlet in Salzburg, BOS,  Berlin Open Studio, Galerie M Beck, Saarland, Galerie der Zülow Gruppe in Linz, Galerie ARTtime in Udine, Palazzo Ca' Zenobio in Venedig (Biennale Venedig), Galleria La scala d'Oro in Rome, Royal Arcade Opera Gallery in London, European Museum of Modern Art of Barcelona, Galleria KOOKOS in Helsinki, Klebelsberg Cultural Center in Budapest, Art.Fair Köln, Luxembourg Art Week, ART Innsbruck, Luxembourg Art Fair, Art Karlsruhe.

In 2018, Kratochwill received the Audience Award "Il Premio Borgo" at Galleria La scala d'Oro Roma and the same year she was the winner of ArtConnection 2018 Münster, Germany. In 2019 she received Woman Art Award at Venezia Biennale and in 2020 the Artist of the Year title by World of Art, London.

Donauwalzer (Blue Danube) - Mixed Media on canvas 20 x 20 cm
Umarmung (Hug) - Acrylic on canvas 100 x 100 cm
Träumen (Dreaming) - Acrylic and ink on canvas 50 x 50 cm
Die Seele Sanft Berühren (Gentle Touch) - Acrylic and ink on canvas 50 x 50 cm

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Katie Wild

Born in: 1989, New London, Connecticut USA

Lives in: Newton, Massachusetts USA

Media: Painting, Illustration, Installation, Mixed media, Collage, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Narrative identity politics

See More Work:  https://www.katiewild.com

Going Green - Oil and acrylic on insulation foam board App. 36 x 75 in.

"We all put on facades and are pushed to conform to ideals of the society around us. My work focuses on series of narrative figures in oil or acrylic, usually with mixed media, on various surfaces. My series, 'Color Buy Number' uses color theory and symbolism in life-sized self-portrait installations."

What themes does your work involve?
Each series is different. In 'Color Buy Number', I have envisioned myself as the heroine or victim of constrained and perplexing narratives. These color-driven alter egos directly and un-apologetically impact the viewer’s space due to the lifesize scale of their cutout installations. Mimetic oil paint renderings combined with found or constructed three-dimensional elements demand viewers to look more closely at the details of these self-portraits to decipher the truth of the artifice.
Describe your creative process.
My process is concept-driven and often begins through experimentation that occurs during an artist residency. I typically have two or three ideas floating around in my head for series that I would like to expand upon. It is during these artist residencies once a year that I have had the studio time to explore different materials and methods for executing a concept in order to settle on something that works. In order for me to fully express an idea, I work through 5-10 pieces per series.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My artwork evolves and changes according to my influences and life experiences. I look to a variety of other artists; Cindy Sherman, Kehinde Wiley, and Alexa Meade just to name a few, for inspiration. I also reflect on pressing political, economic, and environmental issues and use my artwork to represent and express some of my frustrations as a way of drawing awareness. I make art because it is an impulse, a passion, and sometimes it is the only voice I can use to share and make viewers think.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art should be appreciated by both artists and non-artists. Good art engages viewers with its originality, forces them to pause and consider it, and also speaks to some universal truths. There are many established artists whose work is worth a great deal, but in becoming a commodity, has exhausted all original thought. Famous artists are not necessarily making great art. I believe the struggling artist whose work is not so well known often has the greatest potential to make a difference.
What is the role of the artist today?
I believe artists should use the power of engagement to start conversations and catalyze change. Art is necessary as an outlet and as a provocation. It is difficult and rare to be a successful artist, so most artists are also well-rounded people who use other means to make ends meet. This allows for cross-pollination with other fields and a broader global perspective. I am an artist and educator, which allows me to nurture future artists in addition to using my own artwork to inspire.


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Anson Liaw

Born in: 1965, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.

Lives in: Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada

Media: Digital Media, Illustration, Mixed media, Collage, Drawing

Describe your work in 3 words: Deceptive, educational, sublime

See More Work:  http://www.illoz.com/liaw

Taking Lives - App. 20 x 30 in.

"I feel I am useless as an artist when I am happy. Pain is what creates my artwork. The painful experiences that people go through as they journey through life from childhood to adulthood which is full of chaos and hardship are what motivates me to possess my objectives to make purposeful artwork."

What themes does your work involve?
My illustrations take on critical views; both light & heavy about life in the world around us and that deals with relevant social, political, cultural issues and lifestyle subject matter.
Describe your creative process.
Ideas for creative images to happen could spark and take shape anywhere at any given time while I am awake and sleeping. From what is happening on the news, something I read and understood, something someone said or did or a word or re-thinking an existing or new quote, a relevant idea for a new piece is given birth. Knowing well about the variety of art media I love to use, I combine their behavior naturally and make them function in-sync with my visual voice within my storytelling piece(s).
What influences your work? What inspires you?
Art movements and reasons behind their original purposes, mixing of art movements and all cultural influences, the idea that beauty is within everything; light and dark and good and bad, the careful observation, investigation and appreciation of the world around us and visual ideas that compel people to think and act intertwine and function together to represent and serve as my creative influences and inspiration to make my artwork.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Great art possesses the characteristics of using the principles of design well like unity, balance, emphasis, proportion, scale and rhythm to help communicate image-making ideas visually yet at the same time, pushes the boundaries with them in mind and in action in an interesting way somehow to surprise me, that violates my customary valuations of things and that offers me new and other unexpected ones.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because I believe that art and artists play a huge role in society. And artists with their art possess a unique voice for things that need to be addressed, have great creative powers in society and therefore, the artist has a great responsibility to make a positive impact and make the world to be a better place somehow with the gift to be able to share their visual ideas from a small to large scale for any age group for people in the world around us.


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Georg Douglas

"I like my paintings to be strong, whether from colour, form or something else. I want them to invoke an immediate reaction, either confronting the viewers or drawing them into the work. They do not require much analysis or philosophical consideration, but rather appeal to the emotions."

Inner Light - Oil on canvas 100 x 100 cm

Primarily self-taught, Georg Douglas has attended courses at Reykjavík College of Art and Kópavogur College of Art continually for about 15 years. He exhibits regularly since 2010 both in group and solo shows and his work has been published in international art magazines and websites. In 2017, Georg Douglas was accepted as a member of The Association of Icelandic Visual Artists (SÍM). Full details on exhibitions, awards and published work can be found on his website.

"I like my paintings to be strong, whether from colour, form or something else. I want them to invoke an immediate reaction, either confronting the viewers or drawing them into the work. They do not require much analysis or philosophical consideration, but rather appeal to the emotions and create an atmosphere. The world of flowers and Irish dance has been my inspiration for some time.

​My flower inspired paintings use strong colours and form and I also extend the field of view by incorporating microscopic and molecular elements. I like to obfuscate by ignoring scale and jumbling elements which I feel comes closer to nature itself than realistic painting.

In my dance-inspired paintings, I want the viewers to experience the flashes of light on the moving dancers and their bright costumes and in their mind to hear the thundering Irish music.”


“The delicate abstract paintings of Irish artist Georg Douglas display a vibrant rhythm. Through the masterful blending of lively colors and the complex intertwining of resonant lines, each composition echoes a unique abstract melody. The paintings are very lyrical and it is no surprise that Douglas is inspired by music.

Often large in scale, the works have a celestial quality maybe reminiscent of a moment of creation with an explosion of broken down motifs coming together through a radial balance that guides the viewer's eye around the canvas and toward the center of the creative drama.

Observing the body of the artist's work it becomes quickly evident that he has built up a unique approach which is recognizable yet not repetitive. Georg Douglas' paintings can be likened to abstracted visual rhapsodies reflecting upon an idiosyncratic painting style with each piece reverberating a fresh, passionate melody.” 

- Circle Foundation for the Arts, Director

Swathes - Oil on canvas 140 x 200 cm
Joy in the Morning - Oil on canvas 100 x 140 cm
Summer Breeze - Oil on canvas 140 x 200 cm
In the Meadow - Oil on canvas 140 x 200 cm

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affi

Stephanie Holznecht

Born in: 1959, England

Lives in: Janesville, WI USA

Media: Painting

Describe your work in 3 words: Emotional, inspirational, provoking

See More Work: https://www.sholznecht.com/

Golden Dragon - Acrylic, tempera and latex paint on canvas 36 x 24 in.

"I invest in the creation of a piece of art to convey what I have inside: my thinking, my emotions, my life, my essence and my soul. The inspiration that I take from experiencing life creates a feeling that continues to inspire me. I don't think, as an artist, that is something I will never lose."

What themes does your work involve?
My artwork is an emotional journey inside my mind. Expressed as abstract art, it embodies what I am thinking and feeling.
Describe your creative process.
The process I use for creating my artwork style is by taking various sizes of squeegees and scrapers that are used to move paint splashes around the canvas, and add more paint if it is necessary. I choose my colors based on my mood at the time. I move the paint in the same way. Happy brings bright colors and loose, playful movement. Sad and angry moods bring colors reflecting those feelings, and the movement of the paint is more frantic and wild. A piece is finished when I can feel the title.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I began drawing when I was very young. I could copy a photograph of an animal exactly as it appeared by the age of eleven. From that moment on I knew I wanted to be an artist. I took this seriously by the time I reached high school. I make art for myself. Even if a person commissions a piece in particular colors and look, I still create that piece for me. I am inspired by everyone and everything and take my inspiration from the emotions and feelings I get from them.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think a great piece of artwork tells a story. Whether it is realistic or abstract, it should take the observer on a journey. A look into the artist's thought process while creating it. Whether it be the story of a face, flower, geometric shape, loose abstract or a landscape; everything delves into the heart of the creator and helps describe the painting, photograph, sculpture, mixed media, needlepoint, quilt, etc. I believe a great piece of art is truly in the eyes of the beholder.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because that has always been my calling. I chose to dedicate myself to art because I love it so much. I originally chose the practical side of artist as a graphic designer and art director. For an artist today it is the safest position to take, if your abilities allow you this great fortune. It is also where an artist can have a loud voice. As a professional artist life is much harder to make yourself heard. Getting out there and marketing your style is a never-ending quest.


This page was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist