Thomas Jeunet

Thomas Jeunet, born in 1981 near the volcanoes of Auvergne in central France, is a passionate abstract painter who now resides in Paris, where he has lived for the past 15 years. Immersed in the world of art since 2012, Jeunet's journey into painting followed extensive travels around the globe, experiences that continue to influence his vibrant and emotive works.

Finger Prints - Mixed technique on canvas, 15.7 x 23.6 in. - EUR 840

Thomas Jeunet, born amidst the volcanic landscapes of Auvergne, is a self-taught painter whose passion for colors and their interplay in abstract forms narrates unique and singular stories. Driven by a philosophy that painting allows for the freedom to think, create, and share, Jeunet draws inspiration from Abstraction and the extensive travels and experiences he has encountered since his youth. His artistic creations are a medium through which he expresses his apprehension of the world, imbued with emotions and sensations.

Jeunet's works transport viewers into a sensitive universe where a fascination for creation and a love of painting converge, art having become a vital therapeutic outlet in his personal life. Since 2012, while concurrently pursuing a career in the luxury goods industry, Jeunet has devoted himself to art, using it to materialize the creative bubbling within him. This unique intersection of art and luxury has cultivated a distinct aesthetic in his work, where landscapes, cultures, and encounters vividly permeate each canvas, weaving a visual story marked by both sophistication and raw creativity.

For years, Jeunet has captured what he sees and feels, archiving his memories as if on photographic film. These mental images gradually transform into ideas and interpretations that he transcribes onto canvas through an exploration of color, its nuances, and various hues. Different intentions and layers of matter within his works create multiple narratives, interlocking like frames within frames, inviting viewers into stories that unfold across the canvas akin to the chapters of a novel, the sections of a newspaper, or the panels of a comic strip.

Continuously transforming his inner and outer explorations into a grand artistic adventure, Jeunet sees the world as his canvas and each destination as an endless source of inspiration. He also paints to the rhythm of the seasons, capturing the essence and atmosphere of each moment.

Gabriel - Shapes & Colors - Mixed techniques on canvas, 37.8 x 57.5 in. - EUR 3,500
There is No Planet B - Earth - Dry pigment on canvas, 23.6 x 23.6 in. - EUR 950
Junior Suite Sea View - Acrylic on canvas, 39.4 x 39.4 in. - EUR 1,900
50 Shades of Blue - Acrylic on canvas, 35 x 51 in. - EUR 1,900

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Johann Richard

“As a painter, musician, and developer of software and hardware, I have always tried to let different artistic and real worlds flow into one another. I hope I have succeeded in this with my works.”

Only Friends - What About Tomorrow - Plastic on vinyl, 8.7 x 8.7 in. (each) - EUR 814

Johann Richard Hartel first ventured into the visual arts in the 1970s, beginning with watercolor and acrylic painting, before expanding into photo alienation in the darkroom and etching techniques. During his extensive career in the music industry, Hartel discovered a novel painting surface—vinyl records, found stored away in numerous boxes in his cellar. His exploration into various paint materials eventually led him to experiment with pasty plastics. With a touch of humor, he named his new art venture "Flop.Art," as he exclusively utilizes leftover vinyl records and CDs from his own music productions.

Hartel has been described by a longtime observer as a "bunter Hund" (a German phrase akin to "Jack of all trades"), reflecting his boundless curiosity for life and relentless energy. Since the early 1980s, Hartel has enjoyed national and international success as a music producer, composer, lyricist, and musician. His musical portfolio spans experimental film music, pop, ethno, reggae, jazz, classical music, and German Schlager. Beyond his music career, he has also served as an electronics developer, university professor in sound engineering, acoustics, and instrumentology, and as a journalist for German music magazines.

Hartel continues to perform with several of his own bands—covering genres like folk, swing, and Dixieland, as well as German Schlager oldies—but he primarily performs solo at book readings with Lis Levell.

In his artistic process, Hartel listens to his own songs on a continuous loop while working on his objects, visualizing them in his mind’s ear. His music is characterized by a strict structure, whereas his art seeks to introduce abstract chaos into this order. Each of his works is named after one of his songs and includes a line from the song itself. Information about the current version of the song can be accessed via a QR code next to the image descriptions on his homepage. Notably, despite his many musical pseudonyms, his visual artworks are created exclusively under his full legal name, Johann Richard Hartel.

My One And Only - My Life Guarantee - Plastic on vinyl, 23.6 x 27.6 in. - EUR 1,898
Final Curtain - All Pure Delusions - Plastic on vinyl, 23.6 x 19.7 in. - EUR 1,356
Crazy - Vanish Into Thin Air - Plastic on vinyl, 11.8 x 11.8 in. - EUR 407
Mais Dis-Moi - Qui Te Prend Par La Main - Plastic on vinyl, 15.7 x 15.7 in. - EUR 723

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Franchesca’s Art

“As Franchesca Ocampo Swartzberg, I blend diverse techniques to provoke contemplation on global challenges. Inspired by renowned artists, I infuse dynamism and diversity into my creations, urging reflection on technology's impact and conveying a dramatic, futuristic message.”

1 The artist with her work Virtual Prison - 36”x 24. Cellphone Sculpture, Multi-mediums, acrylics, oil paint. Metalique paint, metal paint, color clay, polymer clay, ceramic clay, gesso paint, Epoxy Resin.

Franchesca Ocampo Swartzberg, born on June 3, 1974, is an artist from Bogota, Colombia. In 1996, she embarked on a journey to Atlanta, GA, USA, to pursue her artistic aspirations, initiating a disciplined practice of canvas painting. Through the exploration of various techniques and the playful integration of diverse materials and styles, she has honed her proficiency across multiple mediums, establishing a robust presence in the realm of decorative art.

Subsequently, inspired by renowned artists, she embarked on a journey infused with a sense of drama and allure. Among the esteemed figures who fueled her admiration were Liliana Porter, Mike Winkelnann, and Gerald Garouste.

Her aspirations extend to ensuring that her art is witnessed by a broad audience capable of grasping the depth of her message—provoking contemplation and analysis of the challenges facing our current and future planet.

Franchesca’s artistic journey is characterized by empirical and experimental exploration. As a self-taught artist, often referred to as an "invisible artist" in a society that overlooks and neglects those without formal opportunities, she has adeptly seized chances to garner recognition and project her achievements thus far.

Known among her clients, acquaintances, and patrons as an outgoing artist, she infuses dynamism and intriguing diversity into her work. Her creations showcase a diverse world, incorporating a myriad of elements and standing out for the profound message aimed at guiding future generations through insightful reflection on the issues plaguing our contemporary world.

I-Pollen, 36”x 24. Cellphone Sculpture, Multi-mediums, acrylics, oil paint. Metalique paint, metal paint, color clay, polymer clay, ceramic clay, gesso paint. plastic figurines, Epoxy Resin.
Close Up I=Pollen, 36”x 24. Cellphone Sculpture, Multi-mediums, acrylics, oil paint. Metalique paint, metal paint, color clay, polymer clay, ceramic clay, gesso paint, Epoxy Resin.
In the I-Clouds, 36”x 24. Cellphone Sculpture, Multi-mediums, acrylics, oil paint. Metalique paint, metal paint, color clay, polymer clay, ceramic clay, gesso paint, Epoxy Resin.
Close Up In the I-Clouds, 36”x 24. Cellphone Sculpture, Multi-mediums, acrylics, oil paint. Metalique paint, metal paint, color clay, polymer clay, ceramic clay, gesso paint, Epoxy Resin.

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Christopher Scott Brown

“I love working with colors and creating something that is eye catching. I like my art to feel alive and vibrant. Hearing viewers’ different interpretations of my work helps to inspire me.”

Color Shoot - Spray paint on canvas, 24 x 36 in., $545

"I have always loved drawing and painting throughout my life. I enjoyed watching Bob Ross as a kid on the public access TV channel. I would say he was my biggest influencer. I started to take it more seriously in 2016, self-developing my skills. I think the first step to becoming an artist is to just go for it. Develop an idea, buy everything you need, set up a work area, and just jump in.

I love art because it is infinite. There is always something new to be created. It is quite an addictive feeling to finish an artwork. I just want to keep making more."

Christopher Scott Brown, born in the United States in 1985, currently resides in San Diego, CA, USA. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communications and a Master of Science in Organizational Leadership. Brown's artistic endeavors primarily encompass painting and mixed media, where he explores the intersection of communication and leadership through visual expression, blending colors and textures to convey profound narratives and insights.

Light It Up - Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 24 in., Not For Sale
Ceremony - Acrylic on canvas, 25 x 21 in., $480
Ascension - Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24 in., Not For Sale
. Eruption - Epoxy resin on spray paint on canvas, 24 x 18 in., $560

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Vanessa Onuk

Born in: 1991, Germany
Lives in: Frankfurt, Germany
Describe your art in three words: Bleeding colours, raw art, abstract shapes
Education: Self-taught artist. Trained forensic doctor.
See More Work: https://www.vanessaonuk-studios.com/ | Instagram 

“My abstract landscapes are intended to capture a moment in which we want to linger because the sight, the light, the color or the silhouette of an environment captivates us and we want to absorb it. My own observation of my works is not about subtleties and details, but rather I reduce them to shapes, colors and feelings."

What themes does your work involve?
I am an abstract painter who includes both abstract lamb portraits and figurative representations.
Describe your creative process.
Since my childhood, I have had a great fascination for abstract art with bleeding colors and transparent layers. In order to be able to achieve these effects in my own pictures, I started covering my own canvases with organic cotton or linen and am therefore flexible in terms of the sizes of individual commissioned works. My technique is to apply acrylic paint in layers with different degrees of coverage and pre- watering of the canvas as well as pre- watering the acrylic paint. This allows unique effects - natural, organic color gradients, color bleeding and color transitions - to be created in contrast to sharp lines and geometric figures.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
As an abstract painter, I have two different themes. Abstract landscapes and abstract body representations. The love of depicting the human body lies in my job as a doctor. I have been accompanying people in all different forms of their lives for years. To briefly explain: I not only work as a family doctor, I was a doctor in prisons for years and am currently working in forensics for the police. Every body is unique and beautiful in its own way. While I have so far devoted my studies to abstract representations of female bodies, I would like to soon expand my art to include different body shapes and situations. Through my professional work I come into contact with so many different situations and conditions of the human body that you get a different perspective on things.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me, art is always interesting when it makes me stop for a moment and I can't resist the urge to take a closer look. I am particularly fascinated by the mix of craftsmanship and the effect of chance, which makes each picture appear to be a unique creation. The first thing that often concerns me is the choice of color, followed immediately by the application technique. Paintings with social, political or other socially relevant themes are always interesting to me, but I do not feel that this background is necessary to create impressive art. In my personal opinion, the expression of feeling through the use of colors and shapes is always the factor that attracts me most in art and that fascinates me the most.
What is the role of the artist today?
How we define our role as artists is certainly very individual and varies greatly with the mental background of the images. I'm very happy that I'm not limited as an artist. It's a fantastic opportunity for people to deal with socio-political or social issues, but for some, art simply means the love of craftsmanship, technology and the ultimate result. For me, being an artist still means being able to be free in my expression in a world that is very controlled by norms. I have always seen art as a creative outlet for my main job, which is very scientific, and I am very grateful to be able to combine these different worlds in my life, as I need both sides in my life for my inner peace.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Monica Hilario

Born in:1975, Portugal
Lives in: Greensboro, USA
Describe your art in three words: Science, Existence, Universal.
Education:  - Bachelor's in Anthropology by The Faculty of Sciences and Technology (FCTUC), University of Coimbra, Portugal;  - PhD in Neuroscience, Gulbenkian PhD Programme in Biomedicine (PGDB), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal/Columbia University, NY, USA.
See More Work: www.monicahilario.com | Instagram 

Spontaneous Revolutions

"Originally from Portugal, I came to the U.S.A. to pursue a PhD in Neuroscience. After an academic career as a research scientist, I decided to paint full time. While maintaining a scientific perspective, I am currently exploring visual experiences of what it feels to be human that are shared universally."

What themes does your work involve?
My artwork explores themes that are at the intersection of science, universality and existentialism. The piece selected for this publication,” Komorebi Kaleidoscope”, belongs to a series that I named Komorebi. Komorebi is the Japanese word for the sunshine filtering through the leaves of trees. In the paintings from my Komorebi Series I tried not to paint the trees and leaves realistically to get to the essence of feeling “Komorebi”. The strokes of paint interlace with varying thickness and sizes to give the sense of organic and interactive. The crossing of the branches create points of intersection, a collision of forces competing for photosynthesis/energy. I was trying to have form as a cohesion/tension, a life that can be contextualized to our existence.
Describe your creative process.
At this stage of my life, I find myself working in series. This happens for a couple of reasons: each piece is liberated from the burden of overexpression, and having multiple pieces allows me to explore an evolving set of ideas and techniques. My work normally happens in three phases, The first phase begins with an idea/experience that I embody in an image. Then, I work to achieve the right tension between my conceptual plan and the technical and aesthetic. I am very methodical in the use of the composition, perspective, values, tone, texture, strokes, transparencies to get the right concept and emotional valence into an image. I am finished when the painting expresses my idea with the desired emotional impact.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I find inspiration for my artwork in the intersection of science, universality and existentialism. I wish I could say I create art because I aim for the betterment of society and human existential quest for meaning but I would not be sincere. I make art because I always felt the need to do it. Humans are all creators and I guess I was fortunate to find, very early in life, painting as the ideal creative outlet that suited my inquisitive temperament and desire for solitude. Interestingly, solitude in art is something of an irony because we all create ultimately for others, so “how” what I create resonates in others is what ultimately validates my painting and keeps me going.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Nowadays, art is an open concept that cannot be defined solely by aesthetics, subject matter, functionality, craftmanship, or its socio-cultural role. Similarly, I find the Institutionalized theory of art, where the art world (curators, art critics, collectors, artists…) determines what constitutes great art to also be problematic. While an object can be considered art through any of these means, personally, I find what makes a piece of art great to me is its emotional impact and its capacity to elicit an intuitive sense of sublime, both very specific to human experience and biology. How it can suspend reality for a few moments for pause, awe, or horror. My notion of great art entails that its appreciation can be shared universally, and this is probably rooted in my neuroscience background.
What is the role of the artist today?
Art has the power to be educational, therapeutic, inspirational, and subversive. A single form of art cannot provide all this. Art needs to be pluralistic. The role of the artist is to explore the experience of being a human through art. I was always attracted by the idea that art should be transformative, be an experience that can elevate the viewer and inspire humanity to do better. Art has the capacity to synthesize thoughts, fears, and hopes and enlarge them to resonate within us and give us a feeling of being understood in a very intimate and profound sense, fostering connection and unity, a sense of shared identity.
The Bird's Dream
Komorebi Kaleidoscope
Bird's flight Into Spring
In the Greenhouse

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Don Porter

"My art affirms to me that meaningful action, self-realization, and transcendence are possible and eminently desirable. I may not always know what will come next, but I am enlivened and pleased enough with the process and the results that I often regard it as an addiction to abstract spirituality."

Solvō - Photograph (temporary sculpture) 24 x 24 in.

Don Porter, a lifelong California artist, was taught and mentored by some of the finest: Gui Ignon in Ojai, California and, at the University of California, Berkeley, by Elmer Bischoff, Richard Diebenkorn, Peter Voulkos, Jerrold Ballaine, - and influenced by others along the way (e.g. Hoffman, Munch, Ryder, Delacroix).

Winner of numerous awards, Porter has exhibited his photographs, paintings and sculptures in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York, North Carolina, Los Angeles, and Palm Springs. His photographs and paintings are collected worldwide.

Coincidental with his career as an artist, Don has been an award-winning architect and builder in Nevada and California, where, beginning in the 1970s, he helped pioneer sustainable design and recycling practices. 

In addition to painting and traditional photography, Porter’s most recent work involves photographing temporary sculptures that persuade him to see beauty in each moment (Venus principle). As he manipulates various inanimate materials and substances, he introduces them to baths of pigmented liquids and subjects the ever-changing configurations to layers of light (filtered, reflected and refracted). He photographs these fabrications as they transform, dissolve, disintegrate … cease to be what they were. He does not use Photoshop or the like.  “By intentionally designing the sculptures to transcend a preceding moment of existence,” Don explains “I can record that exact instance of transformation as a requiem for each moment that was, all the while conceding, even celebrating, the impermanence of all that exists …. did exist.”  

“The cohesiveness of my images is with the process itself, not so much with the images or series of images - which I tend not to do. No moment is the same as any other, nor is one of my temporary sculptures the same as any other. Each of these images is a self-portrait of my artistic intentions and decisions at a particular time - a metaphor for my existential being."

Rilke - Photograph (temporary sculpture) 18 x 13 in.
Odysseus - Photograph (temporary sculpture) 30 x 40 in.
Sigourney - Photograph (temporary sculpture) 24 x 20 in., 12 x 19 in.
When Morn Purples the East (Blake) - Photograph (temporary sculpture) 25 x 32 in.

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Aomi Kikuchi

"I am an artist who earnestly learns various knowledge and techniques of textiles, digests them, and takes a unique approach to conventional thinking and methods for creating innovative works."

Shape of Mind - Drawing, Gold Sumi Ink, Canvas 7.62 cm square each

Aomi Kikuchi is a textile artist based in Kyoto, Japan. She holds a BFA from Kyoto University of Art & Design (Japan) and an MFA from Pratt Institute (USA) and is currently an artist in residence at the Textile Arts Center (USA). Aomi has exhibited her work throughout the world including at Today’s Silk Road Exhibition (China), LA Art Show Modern + Contemporary (California), and the annual Japan Contemporary Art and Craft Exhibition (Tokyo Metropolitan Museum).

With over 30 years of practice, Aomi has dedicated extensive and immersive practice to Japanese Kimono Haute Couture, Yusen dyeing techniques, and silk fabrics after becoming a fashion designer. This background inspires her artistic exploration and her artwork utilizes various textile materials and techniques including extremely thin fibers, goose down, and cotton flower along with knitting, weaving, embroidery, and other craft techniques.

Aomi’s figurative dyeing, textile installation, and soft sculptures exemplify her intentional selection of materials that are defined by delicacy and brittleness. With this, she aims to express Buddha's philosophy of impermanence, insubstantiality and suffering of all life. Aomi is currently working on a series of large scale installation pieces and sculptures that explore impermanence through the use of biology and nature with textiles. This new work will be on view at the Textile Arts Center in Fall 2020.

 

Chasm - Original Dye Method inspired by Traditional Japanese Yuzen Kimono Dyeing, Layered Silk Organza, Acid dye, Pigment 90 cm square
Transition - Knitting, Embroidery, Linen Yarn, Silk Thread, Goose Down 208 x 218 cm
Female Mosquito - Embroidery, Painting, Silk Gauze, Wire, Pigment, Cotton, Bamboo Hoop 16 cm round
Trace - Embroidery, Silk Thread, Goose, Down, Cotton 68 x 28 cm

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Cristina Corvino

"In the past two years, my production has focused on the creation of a number of works from the "Time Machines" series that investigate the social role of women throughout history, these works belong to the style of Conservative Art, a term coined with a registered trademark."

Nonnità - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm

Italian artist, Cristina Corvino attended the Liceo Artistico Renato Cottini as a pupil of Antonio Carena, an established painter known for the "Heavens", and of the designer Giorgio Ceretti, known for the creation of the "Pratone" sofa. The teachings of these masters gave Corvino an aptitude for research and a passion for art that will grow and become expressed in a variety of visual languages: painting, installations, fashion, theater; experimentations which over time will give life to mixed media series of works, independent of the will of the client.

With a Degree in Architecture and a career as architect and restorer, Cristina Corvino continues her artistic activity in parallel. In some cases inserted as an integral part of the workspace and in other cases as a continuous comparison with ancient works and various executive techniques.

#Io Resto a Casa - Oleographic printing and mixed media 56 x 70 cm
Rinominata COVID19 in Italy - Mixed media 112 x 140 cm
Creazione - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm
Rinominata Distanziamento Sociale - Mixed media 140 x 160 cm

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Bernd Reichert

"I have always been interested in surrealist art and magic realism. The figurative aspect is important there. Coming from printmaking, I started out with using existing imagery, but more and more I have been combining collages with painted elements up to the point where the painting takes full control."

La Belle Machiniste - Acrylic and collage 70 x 70 cm

“I was born behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany. I am now living on the surreal shores of Belgium. I studied printmaking in Germany (Berlin, Magdeburg) and Ireland. After many years of producing limited edition prints in all forms, I stopped for a few years my art production and traveled the world extensively. Now I have moved my area of interest to collages and paintings. I like to see myself as a kind of surrealist artist in the tradition of Leonor Fini, Eileen Agar and the likes.

My collages are a juxtaposition of elements, images, and objects incoherent to each other, thereby exercising a de-contextualizing form of violence on language and image alike. They contain a kind of strangeness, a disturbing element disquieting the spectator/reader who is confronted with a series of elements taken from one's everyday life which, being put one next to each other, provoke, suddenly, an incoherent situation, a source of obscurity and vagueness. Working with text and images, I like to encourage the viewer to oscillate between reading and looking. It is about reusing, recycling and re-contextualizing the over-abundance of images and information we can choose from Time, the various cultural influences of the placed I traveled to and a Babel-like plethora of different languages are recurring aspects of my work.

The artwork is telling stories, influenced by my travels, but also often containing autobiographical elements."

 

Select Solo Exhibitions

Gallery Kaire-Desine, Vilnius (LT), 2005

Gallery Meno, Cultural Centre Jonava (LT) , 2005

Musée de l’Art Spontané, Brussels (BE), 2008

Gallery 89, London (UK), 2010

Kunstwerkstatt, Magdeburg (GE), 2010 and 2013

Gallery ORT, Birmingham (UK), 2012

Cultural Centre, Minden (GE), 2014

L’Apparition - Acrylic and collage 70 x 70 cm
Merz N°2 - Collage 15 x 10 cm
Waiting - Acrylic 70 x 70 cm
Heize Elektrisch! - Collage 30 x 21 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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