Alyson J Barton

Born in: England
Lives in: USA
Describe your art in three words: Sublime, Romantic, Atmospheric.
See More Work: Visit website

Illumine - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850

Alyson studied fine art in Greater Manchester, England, graduating with a First Class BA Hons Degree in Fine Art and a Master of Arts before studying the traditional drawing and painting techniques of the Old Masters at the Atelier of Fine Art in Scotland. Alyson’s work is exhibited internationally, with gallery representation in Manchester, England, and New York City, and has won numerous awards.

What themes does your work involve?
My most recent body of work, “Remembered Land”, is inspired by nostalgic memories of the wild and beautiful English countryside of my childhood, and our relationship with nature, land, and place. Original oil paintings and alchemic chromogenic silver halide artworks embrace the philosophy of tonalist pictorialism, exploring the numinous, sublime atmosphere of the land and the eternal lacuna between memory and myth. Elements of emotionalism and romanticism emphasise expression, mood, mystery and the sublime through the use of colour, light, shadow, soft focus, abstract form, and atmospheric perspective. My work pays homage to the mystical, ethereal beauty of nature and the land, whilst recognising its fragile vulnerability in the face of climate change.
Describe your creative process.
Studying at the ARC Atelier of Fine Art in Edinburgh, Scotland inspired my passion for relearning creative techniques lost in time, leading to my interest and involvement in historic, chemical photographic techniques, including Wet Plate Collodion, Platinum, and Chromogenic processes. These processes have a mysterious, sublime quality of light which cannot be replicated with modern technology. Experimenting with ways to incorporate these beautiful, alchemic processes within my work, I developed new techniques to create unique, atmospheric, and often interdisciplinary artworks.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am influenced and inspired in my work in many ways – however the greatest inspiration is the sublime mystery of the natural world and our relationship with it. The German expressionist artist Max Beckmann famously stated, “If you want to touch the invisible, penetrate the visible as deeply as you can.” Spending time in the natural world, and endeavouring to experience and creatively portray the metaphysical elements of land and place, which are not easily discovered in everyday life, is a privileged and cathartic experience.
Mysteria - Oil on Wood Panel, 12 x 16 in., $2,995
And Dream of Sheep - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850
Nocturne (Sleeping Trees) - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850
Remembered Land - Oil on Wood Panel, 12 x 16 in., $2,995

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Anatoly Popov

Born in:Novorossiysk
Lives in: Tbilisi, Georgia
Describe your art in three words: For fine-art connoisseurs 
See More Work: https://anatoly-popov.com/homeeng

The Venetian Story - Bronze, plastics, wood, 35 x 80 x 25 cm, $4000

"I perceive each new sculpture as a step forward in my artistic development. I keep pushing the limits of my abilities and artistic skills. Each new sculpture must be finer, more impactful and captivating than the previous one. This is an indispensable part of my artistic path."

What themes does your work involve?
Most of my works are dedicated to historical or mythological images and personalities, which is an eternal topic reinterpreted from generation to generation. They are the blueprints of a human beauty and power, and I always keep returning to the eternal images of heroism, strength and love, incorporated into ancient and mythological heroes. My soul is also touched by depth of nature and wildlife. Its wonderful relationships are often much closer to our feelings than we are used to thinking. Some of my sculptures represent animals in their touching relations, and I make them more lively with the help of dynamic composition and vivid coloring. And exactly now I am in the project of creating fine decorative reliefs dedicated to nature.
Describe your creative process.
In any work I devote much attention to its plastic component: aesthetics and dynamics of the composition, the harmony of visual rhythms. I strongly believe that the composition is the core of the whole creation, allowing to convey the feeling and mood of sculpture. This is the first and the most demanding part of my creative process. After defining a composition, I start its detalization, and keep refining it until the end of the process. I believe that the viewer must be able to find a lot of fine details, that catch the eye and invite to examine the sculpture. In some of my works, decorative elements can even reveal the whole story – for example, I sometimes show the personality of a mythological hero by using engravings on his armor.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
It is hard to define a separate source of motivation. I just feel an internal strive to convey a certain feeling or to create something beautiful. A great amount of visual inspiration – coming from films, painting, sculpture, real life in its incredibly various forms – keeps supporting my inner source of images, that transform into new ideas – and new sculpture as a result. So, I never feel a lack of ideas, I feel lack of time to realize them all. I make art since my childhood actually, and I guess, art is part of my nature and personality.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I am deeply convinced that a piece of art must give aesthetic pleasure to the viewer, inspire and let him or her experience the beauty of the world independently from the selected topic. For this reason, I mostly value realism – this is the school of art that nowadays really allows to separate the talent and hard work from unskilled inspiration. A great art shows the mastership of a composition: a viewer can feel the dynamics and striving even before concentrating on details. Composition is the spirit of a sculpture, while details are beauty. The idea and the composition reveal the talent of the artist; while fine realization is the result of education and hard work. For me, Gian Lorenzo Bernini remains an example of a great artist.
What is the role of the artist today?
Each artist defines his role on his own: some artists choose to be educational, just like Greek sculpture had the aim to show an ideal person and motivate the youth for self-development. Some artists choose to pay attention to burning social issues. Some strive to convey eternal ideas and values, that are relevant in any time. The latter approach is closer to me. The goal of an artist is to realize his chosen role. But in any case, I believe that art must remain art, no matter what topic it covers. There are laws of rhythm and harmony, and they allow art to be beautiful, to touch and evoke the feelings, even if negative ones. Opera would be a good example; as even villains sing in harmonious voices. So, conveying beauty is the role of a true artist.
First Breath - Plastics, wood, 40 x 25 x 23 cm, $2500
Velasquez - Plaster, 82 x 60 x 30 cm, $1500
An Allegory of a Hero - Plastics, 65 x 17 x 20 cm, Price upon request
Perseus and Andromeda - Plastics, 50 x 31 x 23 cm, Price upon request

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jean Jacques Porret

“Achieving a sense of “rightness,” even in the most uncertain circumstances, is the motivating concept behind my sculpture. The work is figurative but not about the figure. I consider myself an expressionist, as I am more interested in communicating an abstract feeling or idea than an actual image. I use recognizable forms to evoke emotions and stimulate sensations.”

Temps perdu Cast Bronze, Edition of 5, 16 in., $15,000

"I began my journey in the world of art from a tender age, nurturing a deep-seated passion for the craft of carving and woodwork. This early immersion into the realm of tactile creativity was largely self-guided, yet I was not without mentors. Esteemed and renowned sculptors, including figures like Pomodoro, Chilida, Ramseyer, Etrog, and Henry Moore, were kind enough to impart their wisdom and field my curiosity. It was within these hallowed halls of creativity that I found myself inexorably drawn towards the complex art of bronze and lost-wax casting. I was enticed by this demanding yet rewarding material – bronze. This enduring metal presented a unique allure, one that was not only ‘responsive’ but also sweet to the touch.

Each creation carries significant sentiment and inherent symbolism. However, one must remember that my work, while stylistically figurative, revolves not around the human form itself but the emotions and ideas it engenders, often reflected in the dynamic tension that ripples through the fluid curves and precarious balance."

Ode to Joy Cast Bronze, Edition of 5, 16 1/2 in., $15,000
Songe Matinale Cast Bronze, Edition of 3, 19 in., $20,000
Rencontre Nocturne Cast Bronze, Edition of 3, 65 in., $32,000
Vagabonde Cast Bronze, Edition of 3, 19 1/2 in., $24,000

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Samuel Cheeseman

“I view my work as a way to connect with the great artisans of the past. A sketch or idea leads onto maquettes, which enables full-size drawings and prototypes. It involves many different disciplines using traditional and experimental techniques. I aim to record moments of precision and beauty.”

Tropical Depression - Wood, Metal, and Paint - 24cm x 8cm - £4,000

English artist Samuel Cheeseman lives and works in Hayling Island, England, where he hones his craft just steps away from the thunder of the ocean. Sam's artistic visions are fortified by 25 years of skills acquired working as an engineer, fabricator, and finisher. Drawing from the tempering of these experiences, Sam began to uncover further mysteries in both metal and wood.

Over the last five years, Sam has established his own workshop and crafted unique tools. He designs, develops, and produces pieces for a variety of clients. Sam's unique visions now take center stage, and this gallery serves as his invitation for you to join us in exploring his current work and the development of future themes.

Harmony in Kiwi - Wood, Metal, Gemstones, and Paint - 23cm x 6cm - £3,000
Royal Existence - Metal, Gemstones, Wood, and Paint - 40cm x 20cm - £4,800
The Untold Element - Wood, Metal, Gemstones - 20cm x 20cm - £3,600
Vortex of Flavors - Wood, Metal, Corian, Gemstones, and Paint - 27cm x 20cm - £3,800

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Weiting Wei

"Transitioning from girl to mother feels like the moment that we acquire our protective layers, our feathers, scales and armor. But our interior becomes softer, more sensitive with the love and bond we develop for our children. So in some ways, we are weaker should something pierce through our armor."

Seed - Polymer clay 5 x 12 x 5 in.

Weiting Wei received her MFA in visual art from Columbus College of Art & Design in 2018. She is a multimedia artist creating works out of paper, wax, clay, and soap. 

In her work, Wei sculpts air-dry and resin clay to represent the struggles of a new mom; helpless but hopeful, sensitive but peaceful, exhausted but beautiful...

Other aspects of her work include the use of white porcelain to represent pregnancy, and the use of tinct rice paper to represent the muscle state around the cesarean incision. Her sculpture uses traditional elements to explore very personal, yet universal, experiences of motherhood.

Light sleeper - Polymer clay 14 x 11 x 3.5 in.
Armor - Polymer clay 12 x 12 x 3 in.
My Armor - Polymer clay 24 x 6 x 1 in.
Armor - Polymer clay 22 x 36 x 2 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Terence James McGinity

"For the past 27 years I have been carving stone and wood as a means to play. I am drawn to reveal inner lives; often touching on fragility and vulnerability; Attachment and Separation."

"Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up."
- Pablo Picasso.

The Date - Portuguese Limestone 46 cm

Terence McGinity is an English sculptor born and educated in Kent. He has lived and worked in London for the past forty years. 

"Much of my life was spent as an actor and in more recent years, played at Shakespeare's Globe and Broadway, New York. Naturally, these years have all influenced my work as a sculptor, likewise trying to feel my way into the life of my figures."

McGinity began sculpting in 1995 with life, clay courses in Camden under Tony Bell. He then discovered stone, in a course at Tout Quarry, Portland. 

“Over the years, I have strained to keep up with Life classes and essentially am self-taught. I have chosen to work with concrete, wood and stone. Each medium has required its own steep learning curve. There are many different types of wood and stone and each type needs a particular technique. You have to learn from the medium, whether it's alabaster or the hardest of limestones. Always learning!"

Terence McGinity has had group and solo exhibitions in London and many of his sculptures are in private collections in the UK.

In Hell Hopton - Wood stone 50 x 15 x 15 cm £1300
Embrace 1 - Blue Kilkenny Limestone 60 x 21 x 17 cm £3000
Violinist 1 - Ancaster stone 45 x 17 x 12 cm £1700
The Brothers - Polyphant stone 42 x 17 x 14 cm £1700

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Janis Ferguson

Rainbow Collection - 1

"I have had a great interest in art since I was very young. My education in fashion design has been instrumental in experimenting with various materials and techniques to guide me through a design idea. Sometime later, I ventured into wire sculpting and hand crafts using various types of wires, glass beads and silk leaves to add dimension to the design. I always believe as long as I have passion, I have a project."

 

Education

Associates in Arts degree, Liberal Arts, Community College of Philadelphia, 2019

Diploma, writing for Children and Teenagers, Institute of Children's Literature, 2011

Diploma, Writing for Children, Institute of Children's Literature 2009

Specialized Associates degree, Tracey-Warner School of Design Technology, 1977-1979

Rainbow Collection - 2
Rainbow Collection - 5
Rainbow Collection - 3
Rainbow Collection - 4

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Cristian Diez-Sanchez

“Culture as a means to equate inequality
A sculpture in the street, a step in culture.

The Urban Sculpture Project seeks to bring sculpture to the street, bring people closer to art, humanize cities, and create opportunities for cultural discussion in wide, rather than elitist, circles.”

Pas de deux Nº12 - Laser-cut Corten, welded with natural rust 200x160x272 cm €14.000

Born in Santiago, Chile, Cristian Diez-Sanchez spent his childhood working with copper in his family's arts and crafts business. Following this invaluable introduction into the world of sculpting, Cristian studied Architecture for five years and then moved to Barcelona in 1976. He started working as a designer to make a living. And what should have been a brief stint turned into 30 years of working as an industrial designer, graphic designer, and image consultant for various companies; he also continued with housing renovations and was in charge of developing and managing a website for tourist apartments.

In 2014, Cristian Diez-Sanchez looked back on his arts and crafts work and his fledgling sculpture work and realized it was time to bridge the gap. Studies in drawing, metal engraving, and architecture, as well as experience as an industrial and graphic designer, allowed him to begin this new life as a self-taught apprentice working in sculpture using cardboard and recycled cardboard, very inexpensive materials that allowed him to work intensively on prototypes, as the goal has always been large-scale exterior sculptures.

For nine years, Cristian has worked on several different collections, all related to the human figure and in many ways related to his personal life as well. The works deal with what has happened and is happening in the world, the constant injustice of the powerful against the weak, and the lack of possibilities for the latter to have a decent education. The phrase "One sculpture in the street, one step in culture" defines the future of his work and his aim is to use his work as a cultural tool, outside the circle of galleries and fairs.

Pause 2_I - Laser-cut Corten, welded with natural rust 200x72x72 cm €12.000
Man II_I - Cast Bronze 61x12x13 cm €8.000
Confussion 8_I - Laser-cut Corten, welded with natural rust 50x13x13 cm €3.000
Man IV_I - Cast Bronze 64x11x13 cm €8.000

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Jan Williams

Born 1958, New Zealand

Lives in: Brisbane, Australia

The artist at work

"My art is like a drug, I create art because I need to create art. My favourite artists are works by Mailloil, Giacometti, Brancusi and...... Paleolithic art."

What themes does your work involve?
"Most of my art is figurative and since about 2010 has focused on large body forms. A fairly large proportion of the population where I live, is overweight, so in a politically incorrect way (not derogatively) I like to use their their formal qualities, creating personalities and using them in a language portraying a variety of ideas, explained in their titles..Their titles are important, like 'Night', 'Black weather', Life at the cafe' 'Symphonic etc..."
Describe your creative process.
My initial inspiration can come from looking and working from other artists ideas, or just observing life on public transport for example. The thought process is usually quite slow, turning over in my head for a long time. Once I've begun modelling in plastercine, the process is still slow, changing, sometimes restarting and fine tuning forever. Eventually I consider it complete, and mostly it will still be based on the origional idea. The plastercine piece will be plaster waste molded. A mix of polyester-fibreglass mixed with powdered iron is then painted into the mold. When finished, it will be soaked in salty water until a rust patina is established, then dried and sealed. Earlier work is made with just a simple pigmented polyester fibreglass mix.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I became an artist naturally, because most of my family are artists or otherwise connected to the visual arts. I'm inspired by the people who live around me. Actually, I'm inspired by all sorts of things from the natural and human world, anything that can be expressed using the human body format.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
What is great art is indeed difficult to define. Great art can be intriguing, smart, inventive, dynamic or introverted...I don't know if I can define it, but I think I would recognize it without being told it is great art.
What is the role of the artist today?
I'm not really concerned with the role of the artist today, I create my art for myself only.
Women wearing an iron hat - Iron-polyester-fibreglass, wood 60 x 33 x 33cm
Iron lady 5 - Iron, polyester-fibreglass 38 x 20 x 20 cm
Iron lady 4 - Iron, polyester-fibreglass 40 x 20 x 20 cm
Iron lady 3 - Polyester-iron-fibreglass 40 x 15 x 15 cm
Coffee table sculpture 2 - Coffee, polyester-fibreglass 42 x 18 x 18 cm
Wide poet  - Iron, polyester-fibreglass 43 x 50 x 15 cm
Dark - Polyester-fibreglass 35 x 20 x 20 cm
Iron lady 2 - Polyester-iron-fibreglass 40 x 15 x 15 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Andreas Futter

A notable component in the sculptures of Andreas Futter is the struggle with the forces of gravity and the endeavour for equilibrium. The artist plays with instability and stability, that elemental demand on each corporeal-sculptural formation, which no sculptor can escape from.

Foresight - Bronze H 320 cm

German sculptor Andreas Futter was born in 1969 in Hechingen. Between 1990-6, Andreas studied at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Stuttgart with Professors Peter Grau and Horst Bachmayer and took a specialized class in Painting and Graphic Art with Prof. Paul-Uwe Dreyer. He extended his study in Art and Interdisciplinary Design with Prof. Sotirios Michou (1996-8). Andreas Futter has been working as a freelance artist since 1998 with numerous exhibitions in Germany and abroad. His works are in various private and public collections.

 

Select Awards 

 2002-2005  Studio grant from the state of Baden-Württemberg

2006     1st prize sculpture park Sonnenwald / Germany

2015     Prize of the jury, Arte Binningen/ Switzerland

2018     Artstages Award, Freiburg-Tiengen

2019     Prize for sculpture, Messe Bad Bellingen

2021     Palm Art Award,  WikiArticon Prize

Jumper - Bronze H 38 cm
Stilt Walkers - Bronze H 550 cm and 650 cm
Rise - Bronze H 40 cm
King of the Rose - Bronze H 67 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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