Scott Troxel

Born 1971, Philadelphia, USA

Lives in: Marmora, NJ, USA

Describe your art in 3 words: timeless, retro-futurist, balanced

See More Work:  https://www.scotttroxelart.com

King (2021)

"I draw on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retro-futurist wooden sculptures that evoke nostalgia for the past as much as they look to the future. I am fascinated by the way pieces of technology, culture, and design reveal their age and aim to make work that cannot be pinned to a specific era."

What themes does your work involve?
I am inspired by design and technology throughout the twentieth century, such as mid-century modernism, the Atomic Age, and art deco. In terms of what my work is trying to say, I tend to expand upon Frank Stella’s famous quote “What you see is what you see.” While the viewer tends to bring his or her experiences to my work and “find” something familiar in it, my goal is to create art that features strong composition, balance, color, form and movement. My work relies heavily on these pillars. I then incorporate themes of aging, organic versus man-made, and new versus old in the sense of how we engage with technology, design, and aesthetics across generations.
Describe your creative process.
My process is significantly calculated and pre-determined. I start with a concept or raw idea—similar to how I would approach a product development project. I spend hours in graphic design software refining the concept and purging bad directions. I do this mostly from a modeling standpoint, as it is difficult to work with the materials I use without a clear direction. Once I have a concept dialed in, I gather my materials and begin constructing the piece in my wood shop. Usually, the piece ends up around 70 to 80 percent true to my mockup. Things change when creating in the studio, but my direction is mostly clear. At this point I bring the piece to my finishing studio to paint and mount the piece. In a nutshell, it goes from a concept on a computer screen to the wood shop to the studio.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am heavily influenced by industrial design and movements like Art Deco, Mid Century Modernism and the use of plastics in the 1970s. I am inspired by artists like Frank Stella, Franz Kline, Martin Puryear, Harvey Quaytman, and the tondos of Leon Polk Smith. But I am inspired by all great art, no matter the movement or artist-- I also love the work of Magritte, Picasso and Giorgio de Chirico.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
In my opinion, great art has the rare ability to be timeless yet dated, modern but retro, organic and grounded but still futurist and otherworldly. I find this concept fascinating, and it is the foundation of what I try to achieve in my work. I want it to feel both modern and bold but perhaps from another era—when it was cutting edge, before time passed it by and changed the definition of “new or modern.”
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of an artist depends on the actual art the artist makes. I am obsessed with modern abstract art. So I wrestle with formal issues like balance, symmetry, composition, color, and scale versus politics or other themes.
Spinnaker (2021)
Instant Crush (2018)
Terebellum (2020)
Ronin (2018)

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Eduardo Blanco

Born 1974, León, Spain

Lives in: Mallorca, Spain

Describe your art in 3 words: Contemporary, fresh, spontaneous.

See More Work:  https://www.eduardoblancoart.com

Shibari - Oil on canvas 80 x 80 cm

"I consider my artwork as Contemporary Figurative. I mixt a few different styles to get a painting according to the times we live in. My work is the result of reflection, planning, analysis and execution through different techniques, although I try to make it seem fresh and spontaneous. Inspiration comes through different channels: an image; light and shadow effects; a concept or idea; a theme..."

What themes does your work involve?
I love art and especially painting, and everything this encompasses. That’s why I don't want to limit myself to a specific theme. I use to paint what I want, be it portrait, natural or urban landscape, everyday scenes, animals…. If it can be painted, it may interest me.
Describe your creative process.
"I almost always paint in my studio and generally from photographs. The creative process is perhaps the most complicated part for me. I start from an idea, then I try to imagine the composition of the work and look for the elements I need to carry it out. After that I look after every part separately is perfectly integrated into the whole composition. Once I begin to paint, and starting from planning, I get carried away a bit by intuition, so the works generally end up being different from what I had planned. This is an aspect that I really like about painting with oil medium as I conceive it (with watercolors I work in a different way). I love knowing how a work begins but not knowing at all how it will end, and I love been surprised an excited at every step I take."
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I would say that although I identify different types or styles of art between my influences (Impressionism, Realism, Expressionism, abstract art ...), and artists, both current and past, that have marked me and that I admire, and that I cannot help naming now (Fortuny, Turner , Sorolla, Zorn, Sargent, Charles Reid, Christian Hook, Costa Dvorezky, Luis Azón, Lita Cabellut, …… among many others), surely there are many more influences of which I am totally unaware. I paint because I can't help painting. Art is beauty, it is another way of seeing things, it is surprise and emotion, and it is a path that never ends and you don’t know where it leads you. I am already on that path and I continue discovering new things every day.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
The concept of art is abstract and personal. Everyone has their own ideas and tastes in this regard. For me, good art is that which makes us feel things, excite us or captivate us. Nowadays I think that art tends to be identified with transgression, and for me transgression does not always have to be art. Personally, I value the artwork that is the result of study, technique, experience and that not everyone is capable of replicating with little effort.
What is the role of the artist today?
I think that a true artist is selfish in his work. A painter does not paint for society or for others. A true artist paints for himself, because he needs to express himself and because it is something that fulfills him. That doesn't mean that art does not contribute to society, quite the contrary, it does a lot. Art doesn't operate any differently now than it did 200 or 500 years ago. The styles change but not the motivations or functions. It can be an alternative representation of reality, a search of beauty, activism art, for preserving history or a representation of a concept; but in the end it’s all summed up in an objetive: getting excited.
Naisei - Oil on board 50 x 60 cm
Día de playa - Oil on board 60 x 80 cm
Red Leg - Oil on canvas 80 x 80 cm
Trío de ases - Oil on board 120 x 120 cm

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Joel Shapses

"During my 55-year career, many changes and growth have come to me. I am now more excited about new techniques and materials to create than I have since I started. I get my inspiration from many sources which include nature, spirituality and my emotions."

Spiral of Life - Alabaster 27 x 17 x 3 in.

“I was introduced to sculpture in college during my junior year in 1964. I enrolled in a course Sculpture for non-art majors and after two years of it, I was immediately infused with the art form.

I went on to Temple Dental School after graduating from CW Post College. Having developed my artist and sculptural skills, gave me an edge in my new profession which influenced my career. I created a dual career in dentistry and sculpture over the years.

I am an internationally collected sculptor and have won over 90 awards. My range of work spans many materials including stone, bronze, aluminum and fused glass. My studio and gallery is located at 6240 Shirly St Naples, Fl,34109.”

Fire and Ice fused glass and - Alabaster 27 x 15 x 15 in.
Fire Bird - Alabaster 36 x 19 x7 in.
Inner Circles - Portero and Carrara marble 26 x 9 x 9 in.
All Lives Matter - Alabaster 80 x 14 x 14 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Kees Woestenenk

“Sculpture, photography, video and digital art are now the most active areas of my work. My work is emotion-based, partly abstract and partly based on the human body and its parts with some emphasis on the male genitals. Most works are derived from a dialogue between me and my material.”

Reflection - Marble 22 x 23 x 13 cm

Born in 1938, in Belgium, Kees Woestenenk studied Engineering at the former Higher Technical School in  Hertogenbosch, followed by a study at the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam. Kees then worked at Zanstra Architects as an architectural draftsman and then as a collaborating architect. In 1975,  Woestenenk moved to Apeldoorn, Holland where he set up his own architectural firm. At the same time, the artist developed Kawecon, a software consultancy for the construction industry and communication technology.  From 1981 until 2003 he worked at the STABU Foundation in Ede, where I developed the STABU specification system. At STABU, Kees Woestenenk also developed a more comprehensive information system for the construction industry, called LexiCon.

"After a career of over 30 years as an architect and ICT consultant, my time is now almost completely dedicated to sculpting. I work in stone and wood although stone is only an addition of the last few years. My work is both abstract and figurative. It is the eloquence of the shape I am after. That shape should be exciting and in harmony with the material it is made from. Sometimes I work from a form I have thought of before and tried out in clay, sometimes I search for the shape within the material itself. This is mostly the case with wood or uncut stone. My inspiration often comes from the human body, both male and female. The shapes of a body can create beautiful tense planes and curves that evoke – sometimes erotic – emotions for me. The goal is to capture these emotions in the artwork and communicate them via the sculpture to the spectator. Many of my sculptures are polished or finished smoothly, emphasizing the interaction between shape and material. Whenever possible I prefer to work naked, that way I feel most comfortable and connected to the piece."

Flaming love - Serpentine 16 x 21 x 10 cm
Welcome - Olive wood 10 x 50 x 10 cm
Handle - Marble 10 x 50 x 10 cm
Inner space - Marble0 x 50 x 10 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Jon Barlow Hudson

"I have been creating large-scale sculpture projects for public and other environments since 1976, with my first commission in 1979, through Miami Metro/Dade, for Homestead Public Library. Since then, I have created dozens of such projects throughout the States, in 27 other countries."

SYNCHRONICITY:MINQIN, c. 2019, - Stainless steel, Minqin Intl. Desert Sculpture Museum, Gobi Desert, Gansu, China

"My sculpture projects tend to be abstract, often geometric in one way or another. Certain projects might have more literal or figurative aspects, such as my 'ETRUSCAN MAENAD' series. The stone sculptures tend to be a balance of natural aspects with human interventions. My sculpture may be seen as iconic for the most part, or symbolic, very often referencing a center, whether actual or spatial.  It often works with balance; space in contrast with form; implied space; ambiguity if incorporating mirror surfaces; light and darkness; a continuum or movement and flow, such as a vortex."

 

Education

Master Fine Arts, 1972, California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA

Bachelor Fine Arts, 1971, California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA

Bachelor Fine Arts, 1975, Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH

PARADIGM, c.1988 - Stainless steel, World Expo 1988, Brisbane, Australia
CLOUD HANDS I, c. 1994 - Granite & stainless steel, Europos Parkas Sculpture Museum, Vilnius, Lithuania
THE COMMON GOOD, c. 2017 - PA granite, Cooper Park, Dayton, OH
EIDOLON:CENTER OF LEARNING, c.2020 - Stainless steel, Memorial Librarys, Central State Univ., Wilberforce, OH

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Sharon Gainsburg

"My sculptures are a mirror of my soul’s journey and spiritual connection. Stone holds the truth of the earth. It imparts energy with tactile fluency and I feel its history and sense its essence. When I carve, I feel connected to the earth and a universal consciousness to create timeless beauty."

Shape of Water - Argentine Onyx 29 x 9 x 7 in.

American sculptress, Sharon Gainsburg discovered her love of stone more than 45 years ago and that love led her to carve in the famed landscape surrounding Carrera, Italy, where Michelangelo carved the lifelike marble masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance.

Sharon has been teaching others to carve stone using the direct carving method for over 40 years. Her work is exhibited in several private and corporate collections both nationally and internationally. She was selected to create an award for the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases, which was awarded annually from 1988-2004 to renowned scientists and humanitarians. In addition, she has been facilitating workshops in Unblocking Creativity for the past 20 years, assisting countless artists of all mediums to achieve higher levels of expression. Her gallery, Gainsburg Studio, exhibits her sculptures along with local artists. 

Goddess of Sensuality - Rose Alabaster 18 x 5 x 6 in.
Knowing - Italian Alabaster 32 x 11 x 9 in.
Angel Humanity - Utah Alabaster 64 x 9 x 5 in.
In The Moment - Italian Alabaster 12 x 14 x 12 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Lannie Hart

"My work examines the perception of women in contemporary society as informed by their portrayal in history and myth. My figurative sculpture, installation and painting embrace ornate found object assemblage as I work to merge the past with the present."

ST. LUCIA - Brass, steel, polymer clay, glass eyes, pigment, patina and found objects. 38 x 18 x 27 in.

New York area artist Lannie Hart, is a sculptor, painter and installation artist with a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. Hart had her first solo show in 1982 at Julie Artisan Gallery, NYC. She was published in 'Art to Wear' and is in the permanent collection of Julie Schaffler Dale. Other solo shows were at SOHO 20 NYC, Azarian McCullough Sparkill, NY and Gallery Broadfoot & Broadfoot Booton, NJ. She has also shown at the Virginia Museum of Fine Art, Richmond VA, Katonah Museum, Katonah, NY, AIR Gallery Brooklyn, NY, Jim Kempner Gallery NYC, Westbeth Gallery NYC and many others.

In 2012 and 2018, Lannie Hart's sculptures won first prize and were acquired by Williamsburg Art and Historical Center in Brooklyn, NY for their permanent collection. Hart won a $10,000 grant in 2015 from Historic Hudson Valley for a sculpture in Van Courtlandt Manor, Croton-On-Hudson, NY. Hart was a member of SOHO20 for 7 years and is a current member of Sculptors Guild since 2012 where she was VP of Publications.

ADAM & EVE - Oil on canvas with collage, fabricated brass and aluminum frame with found objects 49 x 45 in.
BIRTH OF EVE - Water fountain and brass mobiles: powder coated steel, bronze, brass, water, pebbles, rock and found objects. Installation size varies Sculpture 63 x 29 x 49 in.
THE LOVERS - Two pedestal sculptures that fit together. Bronze, brass, polymer clay, wood, gold foil, black marker and found objects 71 x 25 x 9.5 in.
THE ANNUNCIATION - Oil on canvas, collaged brass leaf, fabricated brass frame and found objects

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Todd Jones

Born 1992, United States

Lives in: Athens, Ohio, United States

Describe your art in 3 words: Mistints, sculptural, paintskins

See More Work:  https://www.taahd.com | instagram.com/taahd/

"I am creating a visual language with wasteful commodities that allows for social critique that raises provocative questions of our consumer society. I am looking at our history and practices through our use of house paint. Through my sourcing of mistints and discarded house paint, I bring attention to these paints as they are manifestations of culture and carriers of invisible memory."

What themes does your work involve?
My work involves themes of consumption, preservation, and the passage of time.
Describe your creative process.
Process plays a central role in my work by paint being salvaged and molded into newfound forms while holding residue of its previous life. I produce series of paintings and sculptural forms that allude to the process of sedimentation and excavation. Through material transformations, I reformulate the paints into a visual record of their history by pouring layers to create strata-like forms. Each layer of paint is poured and given time to dry in preparation for the next layer. Through the repetitive actions of layering and carving, I am building and exposing the layers through excavation and examining the layers and their histories. This process of unearthing functions to uncover buried intentions and show the passing of time.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am influenced by mistint house paint representing consumer culture and reflects our lifestyles, advertising, and consumerism. Mistint house paints are found orphaned in hardware stores, unused or returned by customers not satisfied with the finished product. These paints are left behind and sold at a lower price. For me, these mistints and leftover paints represent a consumer's hopes and dreams. One buys house paint to decorate quarters in their home to add desirability, enhance a home's sophistication, or create comfort in one's limited space. I make art because I have a love for making and having more extensive discussions about contemporary culture. I create a visual language that challenges the viewer's association and perception of these materials.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art can start a conversation and contribute to the dialog of society. I am personally drawn to material explorations and art that push the boundaries of one medium into another.
What is the role of the artist today?
An artist's role to be true to themselves and to influence society for the better. Art plays an essential role in shaping the culture of a society. Art in contemporary culture is a dynamic blend of materials, methods, concepts, and subjects that challenge the traditional boundaries of art-making. Contemporary art reflects the modern culture and provides the resources to discuss current ideas and issues. The audience plays a crucial role in the artwork by contributing their personal experiences, opinions, and interpretations.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Ken Macklin

"By combining and arranging materials, I build visually rich, often playful sculpture. I am inspired by nature; the trees, roots, fields, hills, forests, and land surrounding my studio in northwestern Canada. I continually strive to speak to the viewer on both an emotional and aesthetic level."

Morning Voice - Terracotta, magnesium dioxide, painted wood 18.75 x 11.5 x 9.5 in. with base

Ken Macklin is one of several constructivist sculptors who emerged in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada during the 1980s. His use of mixed media and his use of colour have charted new territory for his art. In Macklin's sculpture, materials are used as language, as writing, as personal narrative. Macklin has exhibited nationally and internationally and his sculptures can be found in public and private collections in Canada, United States, Europe and China.

 

Education

Bachelor of Fine Arts with Distinction from the University of Alberta

Advanced Sculpture diploma from St. Martins School of Art, London, England

Perhaps in Paris - Terracotta, magnesium dioxide, painted wood 13 x 11.50 x 12 in. with base
Chiron - Terracotta, magnesium dioxide, painted wood 18.5 x 6.75 x 6.25 in. with base
Bird Song - Terracotta, magnesium dioxide, painted wood 13.25 x 7.75 x 6.50 in. with base
Half Site - Terracotta, magnesium dioxide, painted wood 9.75 x 6.5 x 7.75 in. with base

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Saba Besier

"My sculptural works are inspired by delightful freaks of nature, bringing awareness to their plight, but also celebrating the bizarre beauty of the many species we are losing due to climate change. The luminosity of porcelain adds an element of hope to the despondency of my subject."

Recovery - Porcelain and quartz on wood and iron base 36 x 83 x 26 in.

“I am a Pakistani-born, American artist and hold an MFA from Pratt Institute in New York. I am currently based in Dallas, Texas and have been an exhibiting artist for 25 years; showing my work both nationally and internationally.

My sculptural formations are both a celebration of oceanic organisms as well as an acknowledgment of the ecological trauma that is disrupting ecosystems as they disappear. Because of climate change, the ocean as a system is at risk, struggling to keep pace with human-caused conditions. The sculptural forms intermingle what could exist through caustic mutation or evolve on other planets, colonized if we deplete our own resources. These science-fiction-like growths combine plant, mineral, metal and human representations depicting the existence of other-worldly creatures, beauty molting out of hardened places.

In a way, this fantastical fluid transformation out of rigid materials symbolizes my own story. I found porcelain to be my primary medium due to its luminous characteristic, adding an element of hope to the despondency of my subject. I subscribe to the Bauhaus sensibility of combining intense relationship with the process of craft and Fine Art. Each work draws on a hard-earned expertise in the techniques of slab building, throwing, hand sculpting, metallurgy and alchemy. Mystical tension culminates from the unlikely organic mix of media combined with a nonconventional merging of artistries and a sense of movement constantly envisioned from years of professional video development.

Methods used in other cultures and eras meld with the discipline of formal art training. All of which conspire to bring these aquatic sculptures to life. I have chosen to maintain the inherent ivory coloration of porcelain in the forms to echo the bleaching that is happening to many sea organisms, and at times accompanied by black to signify the disruption they face.”

Inversion - Porcelain 26 x 26 in.
Detrahamus - Porcelain, quartz, copper, brass, steel and glass on wood base 36 x 38 x 38 in.
Dark Denial - Porcelain, chain link, glass, brass 18 x 32 in.
Pan's Peculiarities - Porcelain, glass, copper, brass, steel 27 x 17 x 14 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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