Paul Hartel


"From New York, now living in Ireland, I paint and draw in abstract and neo-expressionist styles with mixed media, including oil, acrylic, oil stick and charcoal. I believe in art for art's sake with the veracity of spontaneity. Only with the viewer, we together capture the transcendent power of art."

Dreams of Hers - Acrylic on canvas board 24 x 18 in.

Hartel has exhibited and enjoyed representation by art galleries in New York City, Los Angeles, Dublin, Milan, Barcelona, and Madrid, with works currently in residence at Green Gallery, Dublin, Ireland. His work has been sold and auctioned for private collectors, as well as gifted for charitable organisations, in the U.S., Europe and Australia. Hartel is featured in many art publications, magazines, cover art, and online galleries.

Blue Memories - Oil on board 14 x 18 in.
Temporal Executives - Mixed media on canvas 46 x 36 cm
Untitled U22 - Mixed media on canvas 30 x 24 in.
New Glasses - Mixed media on canvas 36 x 28 in.

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


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Hiromi Watanabe

Poet and painter, Hiromi Watanabe creates work that is about healing and fantasy. Recently, in 2023, Hiromi has discovered joy in sketching the performances and daily live broadcasts of musicians she has met through exhibiting her paintings at live houses.

A Rose Tree's Story - Watercolor 333 x 242 mm NFS

Hiromi Watanabe creates work that is about healing and fantasy. From Tokyo, Japan, Hiromi is a contemporary artist and graduate of the KWANSEI GAKUIN University. She has received the 6th Star Birth Grand Prix for "Hiro Yamagata Process" and was a Finalist in the 2021 CFA Contest for Exhibition at Spectrum Art Fair, Brooklyn with World Wide Art.  In 2021, Hiromi also received a Finalist Award at the 47th International Artavita online Art Contest. She has shown work internationally, including fourteen solo shows and four shows overseas. 

Also a published poet, Hiromi is the author of the poetry collection "Songs spelled out in feelings for that person" including the poem "Thank you for being born," available at ePhoenix.co.  In 2022, her art book titled "Watercolor Croquis Draw with Free Colors," was published by NextPublishing Authors Press. 

A recurring theme in her paintings is the "smile," which, for her, represents painful experiences of the past.  The artist has suffered from Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and has faced death. It also has to do with the bitter memories of school days when she was not allowed to express her feelings. It was a very painful experience and she seems to have been desperate to live in the future. 

After treatment and rehabilitation, Hiromi has been able to think positively and create art that provides healing: "If it helps someone who has a hard time like me."

In 2023, Hiromi illustrated a third picture book, "A Rose Tree's Story" (written by Makomo Eyama, published by Nicomo). In addition to publishing three picture books with illustrations, Hiromi is involved in a total of 15 books featuring illustrations and poems.

live stream sketch_ Syoma Furugohri & Taisuke Kanda - Watercolor 297 x 210 mm $1000
live stream sketch_ Saika Yoshida - Watercolor 297 x 210 mm $1000
live stream sketch_ Saika Yoshida & Syoma Furugohri - Watercolor 297 x 210 mm $1000
Welcome home - Watercolor 267 x 201 mm $200
Angel - Digital media 2269 x 2000 px
The END of Love - Ranunculus - You are full of charm - Watercolor 410 x 318 mm
Beloved - Watercolor 410 x 318 mm
Watercolor Croquis - JAZZ MAN 2 - Watercolor 380 x 270 mm
Bodhisttva - Watercolor 410 x 318 mm
Elegy of Love - Watercolor 333 x 242 mm
Peaceful Prayer Angel - Watercolor 267 x 193 mm
Joy of Live - Watercolor 410 x 318 mm
Forgiveness - Watercolor 728 x 515 mm
Bodhisttva 2 - Watercolor 728 x 515 mm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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M T Molner

"Painting is giving me a sense of freedom, the light and the colour enchant my senses and with the palette knife, I manage to recreate a three-dimensional effect of the light playing on surfaces. Nature inspires me to try to recreate the natural movement of the wind."

Blazing Sun - Oil on canvas 64 x 59 cm

"I enjoyed drawing from an early age. I was the youngest person to enter the Academy of Fine Art in my home city of Barcelona in its history and obtained my degree there.

My first works were of academic character; figures, still lives, abstracts and portraits. As the years went by, I took on a more personal style mostly using a pallet knife, especially in landscapes, and I found my artistic fluency inspired by the Mediterranean light.

This method with palette knives, using oils and acrylics, tends to give the paintings a third dimension with the generously applied pigments creating a relief that plays with the light and the colours. Nature is copied and transported to the canvasses. I can also work in large dimensions, for example creating murals and I accept commissions for such work."

M T Molner is a an artist and restorer born in Barcelona and currently living between the UK and Spain.

English Summer Garden - Oil on canvas 50 x 70 cm
Sailing into the storm - Oil on canvas 30 x 40 cm
Save the planet from fire - Oil on canvas 50 x 70 cm
Cherry Blossom Time - Acrylic on canvas 58 x 68 cm

This review was published by Circle Foundation for the Arts © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


 

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Mozhdeh Zandieh-Grayson

Born in: Tehran, Iran

Lives in: Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Describe your art in three words: present, poetical, noiseless

Education: Postgraduate MFA, UCA (University for Creative Arts), UK (2020)
BA in Graphic Design, Sooreh Art University of Tehran, Iran (2001)
BA in Visual Arts and Architecture at the School of Arts, Tehran, Iran, (1995)

See More Work:  https://www.mozhdeh.art/

The Matter of If (Green) - Mixed media relief sculpture 80 x 80 x 17 cm

Art is my shortcut for the closeness of thinking by making. When I make art, I don't think about art but think about us—humans. 'We' are the foundation of my making in the notion of outside and inside. From that perspective, my works reflect on our human existence concerning problematic social and individual subjects in a confrontation of existential dichotomies—exploring actuality versus reality.

What themes does your work involve?
The heart of my concept and primary point of reference is the human mind. I am preoccupied with the philosophy of today's life and the phenomenon of the world of lingual-ism in vital and critical states. Through art, I've always tried to understand and expose the inside, the feeling, perception, forces and struggles (with self and surrounding) that we do not necessarily see yet think otherwise. One of the biggest problems from this century, which in some means we all might confront, is the prevalence of noises over voices (in missing the tactility and quietness). My works institute a fine line between these two and try to portray the human being within this exploration and narration. ​
Describe your creative process.
In the making process, I'm intrigued by the invention of forms and the material's manifestation and imagery which click with my concepts and directly reflect on my visual language. I choose how to execute my ideas based on what do the best for what I want to convey. Therefore I have never limited myself to mediums or materials. Hence, my research and study encompass two-aspect conception (in response to what) and formation (in answer to how) often overlapping conventional artistic mediums; mixed media, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography and digital art. Within that sense, my works are partly exploratory and partially experimental. So many tests and trials are involved at the studio to find the most satisfactory material and the best medium to run my ideas and feelings.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
The shortest answer is the people. My inspiration comes from today's life and gaps, things which only art can define, modify or preserve. One day I was reading a book about Marcel Duchamp and the term Infra-thin that he coined, the notion of infra-thin inspired me. When he asked for the term's definition, he replied that the notion is impossible to define "one can only give examples of it: the warmth of a seat (which has just been left)" is infra-thin. Art is a gap that represents the difference between intention and realisation. What art is, in reality, is this missing link, not the links which exist. I grew up during the war. As a child, my life shaped between red and white alerts in the gap between bunkers and classrooms. Infra-thin is somehow rooted in me and finds its way into my art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I firmly believe there is no such thing as good art or bad art. Art is art. Art is the only thing that makes life better than art on all levels. Art is a must, a definite need for our improvement, connection, and communication in both individual and collective aspects. But I'm sure there is a level in art, not in the meaning of bad or good but about having and being for different audiences, viewers, observers or in general for a distinct purpose. And I think what makes a piece of art 'great' is if it touch, embraces and or changes one's heart or mind, then we have a definition for 'a great art' in its (own) narration.
What is the role of the artist today?
That is a good question. In generalisation, I think the role of today's artists is related to multiple factors, such as artist possibilities, intention, personalities, perception and many other elements that can be complex to line a circle around a solid description of the artist's role. Personally speaking, I think it's essential that artists don't leave themselves behind. I feel being an artist means being aware in all means in its contemporary sense. Artists should be present, live the today with the knowledge of the past and an eye for the future, be representative and project a world to the world. Being an artist doesn't mean just producing art but thinking artistically, and thinking that way means live above and beyond, somewhere between the lines.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Victor Montague

Born in: Washington D.C.

Lives in: Washington D.C.

Describe your art in three words: Distinct, timeless, progressive

Education: H.S Diploma

See More Work:  www.VictorMontague.com

The Haitian Migration of 2021 - Oil on canvas 30 x 40 in.

Victor Montague is a self-taught artist, born and raised in the nation’s capital, Washington, DC. Specializing in realism and figurative painting, he uses oil paint to convey his message. Growing up rooted in a community filled with the riches of black culture came with both its benefits and challenges while simultaneously trying to cope with growing into manhood being black in America.

What themes does your work involve?
My themes involve many subject matters driven from my current mood or feelings derived from the unique black experience.
Describe your creative process.
As an art teacher and parent of two, I tend to look at my creative process as very versatile. During the day I fully take advantage of off days and synchronized nap times to get some painting done. However, my true creativity comes alive during the Late night hours between (9pm-3am) and I try to devote this art and meditation time at least 5 days a week.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
To me art has remained a reflection time continuously throughout my life. It’s a time when the world’s chaos doesn’t matter and the only thing that can penetrate my mind is my own thoughts. I can’t tell you the amount of things I have taught myself (art and non-art related) just by being deeply in tuned with my work, but the lessons continue to come. As cliche as it sounds, Art is a lifestyle and honestly I feel the more you genuinely indulge in it while remaining open to constant learning, it will continue to inspire you. I make art because we as humans are natural creators and destroyers and it gives me the opportunity to make my natural instincts as a creator to better this world In my short time here.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Im not too sure as an honest answer. I think the most important part of painting is a) how it makes the creator feel (before/during/upon completion) b) what conversations and feelings it conveys upon its viewers. To me the degree or caliber of the work is a non-factor.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist today remains what I think it always has. We are just constantly evolving as society does. I think that the role of the artist is to convey ideas to and for others that may not be able to in the way that your artistic expression can. The same way musicians give voices to those that are not able to melodically describe those same shared feelings Art can visually do the same thing and bring new ideas/ contradictions/ concurring opinions and so much more. So as an artist I think it is very important to be socially aware and constantly questioning your environment.
A Peace of Mind, with My Piece in Mind - Oil on canvas 16 x 20 in.
Chaotic Needs To An Organized Mind - Oil on canvas 16 x 20 in.
COVID: Party of Ten - Oil on canvas 36 x 48 in.
The Starting 5 - Oil on canvas 30 x 40 in.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Jill Krasner

Born Brooklyn, New York, USA

Lives in: Sarasota, Florida, USA

Describe your art in three words: Whimsical. Colorful. Eccentric.

Education: BA, Douglas College

See More Work:  www.jillkrasnergallery.com

Pink Hotel - Mixed media on canvas 60 x 60 in.

"The process of making art is my anchor. Creating keeps me grounded in the moment. There is no past in my studio, no future. There is just now — and now is where I belong, where I do my best work. My studio is just minutes from my home. Sunlight streams in through a wall of floor-to-ceiling windows and bounces off several work tables filled with works in various stages of completion."

What themes does your work involve?
Whimsy is the underlying theme of most of my work. I tend to view the world around me through a lens tinted with humor, which helps me process even the most stressful events. I like to see my viewers smile as they explore the details of my painting. I hope they enjoy the art as much as I enjoyed creating it.
Describe your creative process.
I like to work in a series, often working on three, four or five canvases at once. There are many ways to tell a story and I want to try expressing them all. Each painting consists of many layers. Often, the first layer is collage. Then, a layer of paint. Next, sanding, scraping back, adding more paint and collage. Eventually, details start to emerge. Although I usually know what I am planning to paint — a floral, a landscape, a tropical — the details, the composition, the story! — doesn’t reveal itself until later in the process.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Color and texture and the way they interact inspires me. For me, a successful painting combines many different, often conflicting, elements, layer upon layer; revealing when completed, a tale well told.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art, in my opinion, engages the viewer completely, allowing them to interpret a narrative uniquely their own.
What is the role of the artist today?
I am an artist because that is what I am, what I have always been. Making art is my way of communicating.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Michele Benzamin-Miki

Born 1955

Lives in: Warner Springs, California, USA

Describe your art in three words: Elevating Provocative Catalyzing

Education: Self-taught artist

See More Work:  https://michelebenzaminmiki.com/

Elevation - Sumi ink and Graphite pencil on paper 39 x 63 in.

There is power in being seen, not just by others, but in seeing oneself. My art is inspired by a life time of work as a teacher, of Zen meditation, non-violent martial arts of Aikido, Japanese sword forms of Iaido, Hypnosis and other skills and healing modalities: this spiritually integrative work informs and becomes a strong part of my art. My art integrates Abstract and Realism.

What themes does your work involve?
There is a spiritually uplifting theme that runs through my art, as in my process. That isn’t to say I bypass themes of suffering, they are just elevated. I draw on my own experience of the feminine and portray woman in their strength and vulnerability (which are non-opposing). I draw on my dreams, nighttime are the most inspiring, as they bring what is unconscious to light. Many series of work have come from my dream work.
Describe your creative process.
The brush work comes out of a ‘point zero’ inner stillness, or expansive awareness in meditating before or while producing a piece. Regardless if I paint one stroke or many, the strokes are connected in one continuous energetic movement using a large brush on paper or canvas with Japanese ink. I want to make visible the inner world. The intention is to evoke and invite the viewer to access a whole body state of being present, in the presence of the art. The principle of 'Ma' in Japanese calligraphy and brushwork, considers the space around the brush strokes as important as the brush strokes, creating ‘space’ inside your audience. Sometimes I come back into a piece, adding details, drawing in pencil or other media. I integrate figurative work into these energetic strokes.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
You could say I am an animist; I choose to believe everything is alive and has a consciousness, therefore everything is connected, and everything matters. My life is about making connections, especially with the brush, ink, pencil, and.paper, and my practices and disciplines polish the inner lenses in which I perceive the world, and translate this onto paper or canvas. The very act of creating inspires me, because it engages my senses, and awareness. I make art because I can. I make art because it is an effective method to spread inner peace and resources, countering the effects of focusing only on ‘negative messages’ in these times, to a more well rounded view of, what is possible now, and for the times ahead.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art evokes strong feelings, provokes thinking, opens the senses. What makes a piece of art great is the ability of the artist to transmit what they see and feel about their subject, effecting the viewer to look straight into the world of the artist, Great art is a transmutation, transcending conventional communication.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist today is to make good art, great art. The role of the artist today Is to bring art back to the raw intensity of the sacred. The role of the artist today is to catalyze renewal in the individuals and for the society as a whole, by remaining faithful to their spirit.
Light Force
Illuminated Woman
Arc
Momentum

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Nathan Miller

Born 1980, Tampa, Florida, USA

Lives in: Covington, Georgia, USA

Describe your art in three words: Harmony, Conservation, Coexistence

Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from the University of Florida

See More Work:  https://nathanmiller.gallery | Instagram@nathanmillerfineart

Remembrance of a Lost Legend - Acrylic on board 24 x 36 in.

"I am an imaginative realist painter of both wildlife and people. I use acrylic paints and primarily prefer working with smooth surfaces like gesso board so that every detail is visible. My work explores elements of design, symmetry, symbolism, and concepts dealing with our relationship with other species."

What themes does your work involve?
Today I am working on a new series that explores wild animals and indigenous human cultures from around the world. And while this series considers the stories, traditions and challenges that surround wildlife, it also emphasizes the need to protect and coexist with wildlife. This series celebrates both animals in the wild and indigenous cultures. Despite the history of conflict, as human populations increase and wildlife populations decrease, there will need to be a shift toward coexistence.
Describe your creative process.
When I begin a painting, I first do a significant amount of research on a topic. I learn more about the culture or species that I am depicting in my work. I create a digital mockup with many photos until I have a layout that I like. Once the mockup is complete, I begin sketching it out on gesso board. And only then, once the layout is ready, do I begin to paint. The painting can take many hours, weeks, and sometimes even months, to complete. It's a very meticulous process. Even when the painting is complete, the process continues with varnishing the art, preparing it for print and, finally, choosing the frame.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Humanity has been disconnected from the natural world for far too long. This outer and inner disconnection from nature is causing the world around us to fall apart. While we distract ourselves with our own pursuits, and as we place ourselves above all else, ecosystems disappear. Somehow, we must find a way to reconnect with the natural world, to appreciate the value of wildlife, and see ourselves as a part of the ecosystem. I find value in all emotional life, and I enjoy depicting that life in different scenarios. In fact, I’m particularly interested in stories that pertain to both animals and people.
I hope my work can, in some small way, help others value nature, animals, and the impact of narrative realism in art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think art fell from grace in the 20th century. It was a period of rebellion from standards that took centuries to perfect. Wall accents were given more glory than thought provoking, masterful creations of genius and wonder. The juvenile and ridiculous were valued more than the beautiful and skillful. Today, fortunately, great art, I believe, is making a comeback. So, what is great art? I think great art is the art that requires time, practice, and energy to perfect. It's the art that is considered masterful, not because of a propped-up name due to gimmicks and fame, but because of standards of design, composition, color, light, dark, shape, and the nature of creativity, meaning, and thought-provoking emotion. Good art has elements of this. Great art has all of it.
What is the role of the artist today?
I can't say what the role of every artist is, because every artist has their own story and their own purpose. But I can say that one thing artists have in common is the desire to speak their truth through their art. Artists simply wish to create - to share what is in them or, perhaps, what comes through them. The challenge today is how much of an artist's work is genuine, and how much is a response to what's marketable. I don't fault artists for attempting to find a balance between the two. If art is a career choice, then it's important for the art to be marketable. The trick is to find a way to speak authentically through one's art in a way that resonates with a particular audience.
(Nathan Miller) Voice of Nature - Acrylic on panel 24 x 30 in.
Forest Dream - Acrylic on canvas 36 x 36 in.
The Tale of Waghoba - Acrylic on board 24 x 36 in.
Legend of the Jaguar Shaman - Acrylic on board 24 x 36 in.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Arjun Kamath

Born 1987, India

Lives in: Bengaluru, India

Describe your art in 3 words: Vivid, aesthetically-rich, thought-provoking

See More Work:  https://kamatharjun.com | Instagram@arjunkamath87

My mind, a shining guillotine

"At large, my photographic works revolves around fascinating faces and characters. To put it simply, I love photographing people. My projects range from documentaries to fashion portraiture and advertising campaigns to tasteful weddings. But at the core, I enjoy telling stories and portraying the unique flavor each person brings to the world. At times, these stories are simple and endearing, taken during my travels, on fashion assignments while I collaborate with artists of the Indian film industry, or during wedding projects. At other times, they are complex and drive a social message. My photo stories called ‘Avani’, ‘Color of Our Skin’, and ‘The Anxiety Series’ are a testament, exploring grim realities of gender discrimination, racism, and mental illnesses through pictures and prose."

What themes does your work involve?
At large, my photographic works revolves around fascinating faces and characters. To put it simply, I love photographing people. My projects range from documentaries to fashion portraiture and advertising campaigns to tasteful weddings. But at the core, I enjoy telling stories and portraying the unique vibrance each person brings to the world. At times, these stories are simple and endearing, taken during my travels, on fashion assignments while I collaborate with artists of the Indian film industry, or during wedding projects. At other times, they are complex and drive a social message. My photo stories called ‘Avani’, ‘Color of Our Skin’, and ‘The Anxiety Series’ are a testament, exploring grim realities of women subjugation, racism, and mental illnesses through pictures and prose.
Describe your creative process.
It begins as a vivid thought which I translate into a final photograph. I start by listing ideas on paper, after which I research and read to ensure my approach is genuine. I also take the time to understand what about that story is important to me. Then comes the pre-production stage. I etch out the theme and story, which are accompanied by the mood board and storyboard. Then, it is all about blending all elements to craft a picturesque mis-en-scene. For fashion portraiture, it’s the make-up, wardrobe, and the overall setting and colours in my images. For photo stories, I have to build intricate worlds through characters, colours, sets, and props. Finally, after multiple inspections and revisits, when I still find my work aesthetically appealing, that’s when I know it is finished..
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
As an artist, this beautiful world that we live in, full of vibrant colours and stories, is my greatest inspiration. My work is also profoundly influenced by my roots and my connection with them. I like telling stories close to home because relating to them gives me the biggest playground to create. A third factor that plays a part in impacting my work is any kind of imbalance in society. Because then, I wish to talk about it in a way that touches people and passes on a message of hope, love, and empathy. To know that I have created something, that will hopefully become a part of history and be remembered is a humbling and elating thought, and it helps me to keep going at the end of the day.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I honestly don’t think art can be so simply defined or segmented. Any genuine artist creates from the bottom of their heart and soul, so putting it into any bracket is not ideal for me. As long as artists are creating with their heart and soul, and staying true to the form, it is likely that the art they make will transcend all barriers, and somewhere in the process, become timeless. Even if the work of art ends up impacting a small bunch of consumers, it has done the magic it was made for. And for me, that is the bottom line– if your work inspires, moves, or changes even just a single person in a small way, it is a great piece of art.
What is the role of the artist today?
I believe that the artist’s role today is to recognise that people are consuming more art now than ever before, thanks to the power of the internet. More importantly, as responsible citizens, artists need to be mindful of what they are putting out into the world. Your art should be a relevant and breathing piece, born out of awareness. And when I talk about art in itself, I think every artwork should be a building block, thereby strengthening the world of art in its unique way. There is no stringent rule about what function it should have, but I encourage that your art evokes emotion. Even if you’re making art about something that’s dark and dreary, in the end, it should be a conversation starter or something that is able to stimulate feelings and help awaken one’s emotions from slumber.
The little boy from Hampi
The societal gambit: marriage over happiness
Holding on...
Congruence

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Nyle Major

Born 1983, New Zealand

Lives in: Auckland, New Zealand

Describe your art in 3 words: Traditional. Time. Timeless.

See More Work:  https://major-art.com/

Repulse - Oil on canvas 50 x 100 cm

"Realism is charming when it borrows a gleam of poetry from the imagination." - Sigfried Nettement quoting William Bouguereau, 1906

What themes does your work involve?
Classical realism is a driving force behind this painting. Coupled with a contemporary framework, the work is drawn from traditional inspiration & methods to replicate and expand on the 19th century French art movements, while using a theme familiar to traditional art.
Describe your creative process.
As with any new work, it spawns as an idea or concept, sometimes you can visualize an end product, sometimes you can't. A developmental process follows where composition and colour palette are worked out which goes a long way to illustrate what is expected in the final art work.These are usually conceived and created as a series of works, as I think it is important that they read well together and bounce off each other when being exhibited together. Therefore, there are usually elements present in these paintings which flow with other paintings in the same series. The paintings go through an underpainting process followed by a second pass. This is usually where a painting is complete, though extra work often goes into finishing it off to a high standard.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Art is always something that has made sense to me. It just helps that a little technical aptitude has been learned to make it a strength. I'm inspired by the greats who came before us and the desire to replicate the harmony their paintings have. Artists such as William Bouguereau, Alma Tadema, and Gotfried Lindeaur. Being able to make art is a huge joy that has come from years of perseverance, and my art practice is now reaching a point where the work I have completed inspires the next one on its own merits.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Asking what good art is can be a touchy subject, as it is ultimately subjective.. The definition of art has morphed and changed so much in the last one hundred years. I have always believed that art requires time and skill in order be called 'art'. The end result needs to be able to provoke a reaction in the viewer- for better or worse, and whatever the idea is in the artwork that the artist is trying to convey- needs to be seen and understood by as many viewers as possible.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of the artist hasn't changed in essence. It is to communicate an idea through (in this case), a visual means. How art is seen by others is where contemporary society has changed what an artist creates. As mentioned, I believe art requires a level of talent that sets them apart from everyone else, but the modern definition of art is a lot broader now than in the past. Therefore while art is to still communicate ideas & provoke reactions, contemporary art has diluted the intensity of those ideas, therefore making the art of the past more revered and inspiring.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist