Alyson J Barton

Born in: England
Lives in: USA
Describe your art in three words: Sublime, Romantic, Atmospheric.
See More Work: Visit website

Illumine - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850

Alyson studied fine art in Greater Manchester, England, graduating with a First Class BA Hons Degree in Fine Art and a Master of Arts before studying the traditional drawing and painting techniques of the Old Masters at the Atelier of Fine Art in Scotland. Alyson’s work is exhibited internationally, with gallery representation in Manchester, England, and New York City, and has won numerous awards.

What themes does your work involve?
My most recent body of work, “Remembered Land”, is inspired by nostalgic memories of the wild and beautiful English countryside of my childhood, and our relationship with nature, land, and place. Original oil paintings and alchemic chromogenic silver halide artworks embrace the philosophy of tonalist pictorialism, exploring the numinous, sublime atmosphere of the land and the eternal lacuna between memory and myth. Elements of emotionalism and romanticism emphasise expression, mood, mystery and the sublime through the use of colour, light, shadow, soft focus, abstract form, and atmospheric perspective. My work pays homage to the mystical, ethereal beauty of nature and the land, whilst recognising its fragile vulnerability in the face of climate change.
Describe your creative process.
Studying at the ARC Atelier of Fine Art in Edinburgh, Scotland inspired my passion for relearning creative techniques lost in time, leading to my interest and involvement in historic, chemical photographic techniques, including Wet Plate Collodion, Platinum, and Chromogenic processes. These processes have a mysterious, sublime quality of light which cannot be replicated with modern technology. Experimenting with ways to incorporate these beautiful, alchemic processes within my work, I developed new techniques to create unique, atmospheric, and often interdisciplinary artworks.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am influenced and inspired in my work in many ways – however the greatest inspiration is the sublime mystery of the natural world and our relationship with it. The German expressionist artist Max Beckmann famously stated, “If you want to touch the invisible, penetrate the visible as deeply as you can.” Spending time in the natural world, and endeavouring to experience and creatively portray the metaphysical elements of land and place, which are not easily discovered in everyday life, is a privileged and cathartic experience.
Mysteria - Oil on Wood Panel, 12 x 16 in., $2,995
And Dream of Sheep - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850
Nocturne (Sleeping Trees) - Chromogenic Silver Halide, 12 x 12 in., $850
Remembered Land - Oil on Wood Panel, 12 x 16 in., $2,995

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Anatoly Popov

Born in:Novorossiysk
Lives in: Tbilisi, Georgia
Describe your art in three words: For fine-art connoisseurs 
See More Work: https://anatoly-popov.com/homeeng

The Venetian Story - Bronze, plastics, wood, 35 x 80 x 25 cm, $4000

"I perceive each new sculpture as a step forward in my artistic development. I keep pushing the limits of my abilities and artistic skills. Each new sculpture must be finer, more impactful and captivating than the previous one. This is an indispensable part of my artistic path."

What themes does your work involve?
Most of my works are dedicated to historical or mythological images and personalities, which is an eternal topic reinterpreted from generation to generation. They are the blueprints of a human beauty and power, and I always keep returning to the eternal images of heroism, strength and love, incorporated into ancient and mythological heroes. My soul is also touched by depth of nature and wildlife. Its wonderful relationships are often much closer to our feelings than we are used to thinking. Some of my sculptures represent animals in their touching relations, and I make them more lively with the help of dynamic composition and vivid coloring. And exactly now I am in the project of creating fine decorative reliefs dedicated to nature.
Describe your creative process.
In any work I devote much attention to its plastic component: aesthetics and dynamics of the composition, the harmony of visual rhythms. I strongly believe that the composition is the core of the whole creation, allowing to convey the feeling and mood of sculpture. This is the first and the most demanding part of my creative process. After defining a composition, I start its detalization, and keep refining it until the end of the process. I believe that the viewer must be able to find a lot of fine details, that catch the eye and invite to examine the sculpture. In some of my works, decorative elements can even reveal the whole story – for example, I sometimes show the personality of a mythological hero by using engravings on his armor.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
It is hard to define a separate source of motivation. I just feel an internal strive to convey a certain feeling or to create something beautiful. A great amount of visual inspiration – coming from films, painting, sculpture, real life in its incredibly various forms – keeps supporting my inner source of images, that transform into new ideas – and new sculpture as a result. So, I never feel a lack of ideas, I feel lack of time to realize them all. I make art since my childhood actually, and I guess, art is part of my nature and personality.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I am deeply convinced that a piece of art must give aesthetic pleasure to the viewer, inspire and let him or her experience the beauty of the world independently from the selected topic. For this reason, I mostly value realism – this is the school of art that nowadays really allows to separate the talent and hard work from unskilled inspiration. A great art shows the mastership of a composition: a viewer can feel the dynamics and striving even before concentrating on details. Composition is the spirit of a sculpture, while details are beauty. The idea and the composition reveal the talent of the artist; while fine realization is the result of education and hard work. For me, Gian Lorenzo Bernini remains an example of a great artist.
What is the role of the artist today?
Each artist defines his role on his own: some artists choose to be educational, just like Greek sculpture had the aim to show an ideal person and motivate the youth for self-development. Some artists choose to pay attention to burning social issues. Some strive to convey eternal ideas and values, that are relevant in any time. The latter approach is closer to me. The goal of an artist is to realize his chosen role. But in any case, I believe that art must remain art, no matter what topic it covers. There are laws of rhythm and harmony, and they allow art to be beautiful, to touch and evoke the feelings, even if negative ones. Opera would be a good example; as even villains sing in harmonious voices. So, conveying beauty is the role of a true artist.
First Breath - Plastics, wood, 40 x 25 x 23 cm, $2500
Velasquez - Plaster, 82 x 60 x 30 cm, $1500
An Allegory of a Hero - Plastics, 65 x 17 x 20 cm, Price upon request
Perseus and Andromeda - Plastics, 50 x 31 x 23 cm, Price upon request

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Sylvia Wuensche-Wienands

Born in: 1954, Stuttgart, Germany
Lives in: Naperville, Illinois, USA
Describe your art in three words: colorful, semi abstract, mystical
See More Work: www.sylviaww-art.com

"I believe one purpose of art is to freeze a moment in time, to pause life, either to have time to ponder about the object or to have the feeling that things are eternal and not subject to constant change and decay.
Emotional impact usually matters to me more than the actual object. Different colors and contrast create different moods so I mainly create lyrical semi abstract "mood pictures"."

What themes does your work involve?
"I get inspired by walking in nature and taking photos, often in macro settings, which makes abstract compositions possible. Using spiritual texts I create associations and visions for my paintings (e.g Buddhist writings from Koyasan, Japan and mystical writings from texts of medieval saints); color plays a major role to establish an emotional connection. Development of themes by listening to classical music evolve: e.g. Lyadov: Enchanted Lake for mood on a Lake Michigan painting, redemption theme in The Flying Dutchman by Wagner)."
Describe your creative process.
My work often starts with photos I take that I find interesting in mood, color, composition and/or atmosphere. I develop the photos further by e.g. cropping or turning the photo around to emphasize its abstractness. For painting the photo is an inspiration and not copied literally. I have different styles that range from plein air to dreamlike to semi-abstract and abstract paintings. I work intuitively and don’t always have a clear idea of the end product right away, but I know in what direction I want to take the art piece. All my work has a mystical, somewhat spiritual quality even if not always explicit. My semi-abstract work does not reveal the object immediately. I work in a series of at least three pictures in painting, the photos usually stand alone.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I am influenced by art of the great masters. I lived in Europe until age 30 and went to famous museums in the former Soviet Union, France, Italy and Germany, thus was confronted with many art styles and philosophies. Moving to Canada and the United States widened my horizon even more. Since I am a colorist I especially enjoy the Fauvists and Emil Nolde for painting. Monet inspires my photography as he uses the same subject matter in different light situations (Haystack and Rouen Cathedral series), changing the color hues. Making art delights my soul and I enjoy interpreting the world by being inspired by other art forms like music, mythology and stories. They are directly or indirectly always part of my visual art.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Apart from formal criteria like good composition, color balance, mastery of technique the art piece has to make an emotional impact. Technical skill and expressiveness are essential for the creative process. Combined they elicit an emotional response so the viewer can connect. It invites reflection on a visual level. The love and effort an artist has spent to create his/her work needs to shine through. Then it feels like authentic art. For me, good art always includes hope.
What is the role of the artist today?
The artist invites others to look at the world differently on a visual level to expand their horizons. He/She makes connections with the community, in person and via social media. Art does not always give an obvious message but can leave room for interpretation by the viewer. It is crucial to be genuine and express what is inside you, not what society expects. Authenticity should show in your art. Celebrate life and hope!

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Georg Douglas

Born in: 1945, N. Ireland
Lives in: Mosfellsbær, Iceland
Describe your art in three words: Joyful, colourful, complex
Education: BSc, PhD in Earth Science
See More Work: artgeorg.com

"I like my paintings to be strong, whether from colour, form or something else. I want them to invoke an immediate reaction, either confronting the viewers or drawing them in to the work. They do not require much analysis or philosophical consideration, but rather appeal to the emotions and create an atmosphere. The world of flowers and Irish dance have been my inspiration for some time."

What themes does your work involve?
For several years my themes have been the plant and floral world and Irish dance. Although disparate themes I emphasize movement in both and often get comments on how similar the work is.
Describe your creative process.
The majority of my paintings originate as random ideas which come to me when outside in nature, lying in bed, at the theatre or elsewhere. Some have been turning over in my head for a long time, others not. I start with a very simple basic drawing which I try to keep throughout. Otherwise I let the painting evolve very much on its own.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
My inspiration is the beauty of nature. I was born and raised in the country and have always had a close connection to nature both in work and play. I have never had doubts about its beauty. My art is probably to some extent an attempt to express this in its many aspects and convey it to others.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
I think good art needs to be original or even unique in some way, whether subject, style colour or whatever. Even so, great art may be great only for the viewer, for I think the input in all visual art is 50% from the artist and 50% from the viewer.
What is the role of the artist today?
Do what he or she must do and let us see it. Art was always close even when I was working in a completely different field and it never went away completely. I later years I slowly realised that this is what I should probably have been doing all along. Art is such a huge field that it´s hard to define its function in modern society. However I think that exposure is the key element. It needs to be everywhere and varied. With the Internet I think that this has already happened to a large extent. Circle Foundation For the Arts is an excellent example of an organisation making this possible.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Nicolas Castell

Born in: 1998, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lives in: Granada, Spain
Describe your art in three words: vivid, graphic, dreamy
Education: MFA in Drawing from the University of Granada (Spain)
See More Work:  https://www.nicolascastell.com/ | Instagram 

"I have been working as an artist with more than twenty exhibitions in recent years, as a freelance illustrator for advertising, children's books, comics, cinema, music, and more. Some of my clients have included The Times, The Washington Post, Dupuis, SM, Adobe, Mercedes-Benz, Paradores, and Santillana. In my illustrations, I strive to create narrative scenes that blend elements of history and fantasy, weaving together compelling visual stories that captivate and engage viewers."

What themes does your work involve?
Dreams, fantasy, history, biographies, Japan and science fiction.
Describe your creative process.
I read the briefing few times while I try to make the perfect scene in my mind. Then I play with it doing my sketches with pencil. After the composition y settled I ink it and then I play with the colors!
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
Life in general, a ride with the bicycle can be inspiring, a trip to a different culture as well. When I can't travel I enjoy books and movies. An interesting dream or meditation can inspire me too. I make art because I love it, and I need it too. It's something beyond my will, if I not do it I'm not feeling myself.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Good art happens when the artist is able to portray his emotions and ideas in the piece. Sometimes you can have a good idea, but if you didn't master the craft enough, that idea can be lost during the process of that piece of art. Maybe because the artist is not skillful, or maybe because the artist is confused.
What is the role of the artist today?
To connect with the people, to make this living experience less horrible inviting the people to dream, to travel with the imagination and to know there are more like us, that people of other countries they love, work and suffer too, we're not that different, art is the best way to connect first with oneself, and second with the world.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Vanessa Onuk

Born in: 1991, Germany
Lives in: Frankfurt, Germany
Describe your art in three words: Bleeding colours, raw art, abstract shapes
Education: Self-taught artist. Trained forensic doctor.
See More Work: https://www.vanessaonuk-studios.com/ | Instagram 

“My abstract landscapes are intended to capture a moment in which we want to linger because the sight, the light, the color or the silhouette of an environment captivates us and we want to absorb it. My own observation of my works is not about subtleties and details, but rather I reduce them to shapes, colors and feelings."

What themes does your work involve?
I am an abstract painter who includes both abstract lamb portraits and figurative representations.
Describe your creative process.
Since my childhood, I have had a great fascination for abstract art with bleeding colors and transparent layers. In order to be able to achieve these effects in my own pictures, I started covering my own canvases with organic cotton or linen and am therefore flexible in terms of the sizes of individual commissioned works. My technique is to apply acrylic paint in layers with different degrees of coverage and pre- watering of the canvas as well as pre- watering the acrylic paint. This allows unique effects - natural, organic color gradients, color bleeding and color transitions - to be created in contrast to sharp lines and geometric figures.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
As an abstract painter, I have two different themes. Abstract landscapes and abstract body representations. The love of depicting the human body lies in my job as a doctor. I have been accompanying people in all different forms of their lives for years. To briefly explain: I not only work as a family doctor, I was a doctor in prisons for years and am currently working in forensics for the police. Every body is unique and beautiful in its own way. While I have so far devoted my studies to abstract representations of female bodies, I would like to soon expand my art to include different body shapes and situations. Through my professional work I come into contact with so many different situations and conditions of the human body that you get a different perspective on things.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me, art is always interesting when it makes me stop for a moment and I can't resist the urge to take a closer look. I am particularly fascinated by the mix of craftsmanship and the effect of chance, which makes each picture appear to be a unique creation. The first thing that often concerns me is the choice of color, followed immediately by the application technique. Paintings with social, political or other socially relevant themes are always interesting to me, but I do not feel that this background is necessary to create impressive art. In my personal opinion, the expression of feeling through the use of colors and shapes is always the factor that attracts me most in art and that fascinates me the most.
What is the role of the artist today?
How we define our role as artists is certainly very individual and varies greatly with the mental background of the images. I'm very happy that I'm not limited as an artist. It's a fantastic opportunity for people to deal with socio-political or social issues, but for some, art simply means the love of craftsmanship, technology and the ultimate result. For me, being an artist still means being able to be free in my expression in a world that is very controlled by norms. I have always seen art as a creative outlet for my main job, which is very scientific, and I am very grateful to be able to combine these different worlds in my life, as I need both sides in my life for my inner peace.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Monica Hilario

Born in:1975, Portugal
Lives in: Greensboro, USA
Describe your art in three words: Science, Existence, Universal.
Education:  - Bachelor's in Anthropology by The Faculty of Sciences and Technology (FCTUC), University of Coimbra, Portugal;  - PhD in Neuroscience, Gulbenkian PhD Programme in Biomedicine (PGDB), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal/Columbia University, NY, USA.
See More Work: www.monicahilario.com | Instagram 

Spontaneous Revolutions

"Originally from Portugal, I came to the U.S.A. to pursue a PhD in Neuroscience. After an academic career as a research scientist, I decided to paint full time. While maintaining a scientific perspective, I am currently exploring visual experiences of what it feels to be human that are shared universally."

What themes does your work involve?
My artwork explores themes that are at the intersection of science, universality and existentialism. The piece selected for this publication,” Komorebi Kaleidoscope”, belongs to a series that I named Komorebi. Komorebi is the Japanese word for the sunshine filtering through the leaves of trees. In the paintings from my Komorebi Series I tried not to paint the trees and leaves realistically to get to the essence of feeling “Komorebi”. The strokes of paint interlace with varying thickness and sizes to give the sense of organic and interactive. The crossing of the branches create points of intersection, a collision of forces competing for photosynthesis/energy. I was trying to have form as a cohesion/tension, a life that can be contextualized to our existence.
Describe your creative process.
At this stage of my life, I find myself working in series. This happens for a couple of reasons: each piece is liberated from the burden of overexpression, and having multiple pieces allows me to explore an evolving set of ideas and techniques. My work normally happens in three phases, The first phase begins with an idea/experience that I embody in an image. Then, I work to achieve the right tension between my conceptual plan and the technical and aesthetic. I am very methodical in the use of the composition, perspective, values, tone, texture, strokes, transparencies to get the right concept and emotional valence into an image. I am finished when the painting expresses my idea with the desired emotional impact.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
I find inspiration for my artwork in the intersection of science, universality and existentialism. I wish I could say I create art because I aim for the betterment of society and human existential quest for meaning but I would not be sincere. I make art because I always felt the need to do it. Humans are all creators and I guess I was fortunate to find, very early in life, painting as the ideal creative outlet that suited my inquisitive temperament and desire for solitude. Interestingly, solitude in art is something of an irony because we all create ultimately for others, so “how” what I create resonates in others is what ultimately validates my painting and keeps me going.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
Nowadays, art is an open concept that cannot be defined solely by aesthetics, subject matter, functionality, craftmanship, or its socio-cultural role. Similarly, I find the Institutionalized theory of art, where the art world (curators, art critics, collectors, artists…) determines what constitutes great art to also be problematic. While an object can be considered art through any of these means, personally, I find what makes a piece of art great to me is its emotional impact and its capacity to elicit an intuitive sense of sublime, both very specific to human experience and biology. How it can suspend reality for a few moments for pause, awe, or horror. My notion of great art entails that its appreciation can be shared universally, and this is probably rooted in my neuroscience background.
What is the role of the artist today?
Art has the power to be educational, therapeutic, inspirational, and subversive. A single form of art cannot provide all this. Art needs to be pluralistic. The role of the artist is to explore the experience of being a human through art. I was always attracted by the idea that art should be transformative, be an experience that can elevate the viewer and inspire humanity to do better. Art has the capacity to synthesize thoughts, fears, and hopes and enlarge them to resonate within us and give us a feeling of being understood in a very intimate and profound sense, fostering connection and unity, a sense of shared identity.
The Bird's Dream
Komorebi Kaleidoscope
Bird's flight Into Spring
In the Greenhouse

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Björn Dämpfling

Born in: 1949, Germany
Lives in: Berlin, Germany
Describe your art in three words: Freedom of expression
Education: Self-taught artist
See More Work:  https://www.creativecreatures.com/

"My art is about to create with every image new stuff I have not seen before and to get as far from depiction of reality as possible. Maximal freedom of expression."

What themes does your work involve?
Everything of lasting visual interest for me, especially structures, handmade. That beats even nature.
Describe your creative process.
My brain as a scientist has no control, I start when a feel the drive to do it. I produce my art digitally, but the computer is just a drawing tool for me. Even if I use tools only the computer can offer, I alter them to make them mine. Perfection and tricks that only the machine can produce, ad zero to creativity, but it can take away a lot of it. How I start and how long it takes to make my images varies between 3 minutes and nine month pure production time. "Alice" took nine month within two years.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
For me art was always like sex: It is not all, but all is not much without it. A necessity, but no challenge, since my interest in art is based on what can't be learned beyond technical skills. So nothing to be proud of, therefore I decided to become a scientist, since everyone in that field starts from scratch. I guess I needed art in order to preserve my logical brain from being destroyed by my fantasies that landed on paper. For the last 20-25 years art became my main activity, but never all the time. Everything I see influences me, but my everyday thinking is that of a political scientist and an economist, though I am no longer involved in activ research.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me great art is an image one can look at every day and see something new.
What is the role of the artist today?
The role of an artist is to decide what his or her role should be and for whom, general answers are impossible.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Coriolana Simon

Born in: 1945, USA
Lives in: Silver Spring, Maryland - USA
Describe your art in three words: Still life re-imagined
Education: Bachelor of Arts in Ancient Greek, New York University Master of Arts in Arabic, New York University Certificate in Architectural Drafting, Mechanics Institute of New York Bachelor of Architecture, City University of New York Master of Architecture (minus thesis), City University of New York
See More Work:  www.TimePointsPhotography.com

Still Life of Restrained Ostentation - Archival digital photograph

"I have long admired the still lifes by Dutch artists of the 17th century. Painted in a style as realistic as photographs, they give us a detailed view of Dutch culture and society. Today I create still lifes in the Dutch style as realistic as paintings with my camera. While never copying a painting, my visual vocabulary, approach to composition, and use of lighting all bow to the Dutch golden age."

What themes does your work involve?
A principal theme in the Dutch paintings was often a moral warning: Moderation! While extremely prosperous, the Dutch feared God would punish them for their surfeit. The window into Dutch society created by the paintings also serves as a mirror and gives us food for thought about our own way of life. In my still lifes, the compositions ask the viewer how much of the moral warnings symbolized in the Dutch paintings hold true for us today. In our time of plenty, do we harbor any parallel fears about overabundance of material possessions? A related theme is the impermanence of all material things: “memento mori.” This theme is reflected in a myriad of ways in the Dutch paintings and in my work. . My still lifes ask: How do we respond to the obvious impermanence of all things?
Describe your creative process.
Choose theme based on a key object or a style of Dutch painting or a seasonal subject like tulips. Plan “main actors.” Sketch in pencil. Gather the whole “cast.” Find unusual / special objects if necessary. Start placing objects on table -- the "bones" of the composition. Add lesser elements. Eliminate certain pieces to clarify structure and give cohesion. Create “sketch” shots in camera. Adjust, re-adjust, re-adjust. Wait for right light, depending on season or time of day. Photograph final composition. Do a little editing in Lightroom and Photoshop for highlights and shadows. A still life is finished when it is printed, mounted, and framed in a historic Dutch-style frame.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
When I first tried my hand at still lifes, I looked for guidance from photography reference books and found almost nothing. I turned then to texts on painting to learn about composition. But this was dry and not often applicable. Instead, I started to study actual paintings. Nineteenth century painters like Cezanne and Van Gogh offered still lifes, but the 17th century Dutch still lifes evoked a powerful, intense response. These painters – Claes, de Heem, Kalf, and many others – became not only my inspiration but also my teachers. I learned their styles, their subject matter, their treatment of light so that now, as I work on a particular still life, I can sense them looking over my shoulder, guiding and correcting me as I work.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
“Good” art is difficult to define and can be highly subjective. Nonetheless, “good” art touches the viewer in the heart and in the intellect. If a work of art is created with the artist’s deep passion, this intensity is communicated, even subliminally, to the viewer, and the viewer responds. “Great” art may not be universally recognized as such by all the peoples of the world, but it touches many people of many cultures across time.
What is the role of the artist today?
In a traditional sense, the artist creates “beauty,” however that is defined, and brings some light and joy into a world that is often dark and depressing. Contemporary art may also comment on such major issues as war, social inequality, or climate change. In my own work, which takes the more traditionalist path, one of my goals is to slow down the viewer and retrain their eye away from the frantic pace of visuals around us. I want the viewer to let their eyes slow down, to take time to explore a whole composition, every object in it, and the relationship – or “narrative” – among the objects.

Still Life with Ship Bowl and Crabs - Archival digital photograph
Still Life with Grand Tulipiere - Archival digital photograph
Still Life of the Righteous Pipe-Smoker - Archival digital photograph
Still Life of Distant Geography - Archival digital photograph

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist


Anthea Kerou

Born in: 1978, New Jersey, USA
Lives in: Palm Beach, Florida, USA
Describe your art in three words: Feminine, etheric, passionate
Education: New York University, Center for Advanced Digital Applications, NY, NY March 2003 Masters of Science Digital Imaging and Design, | Montclair State University, Upper Montclair, NJ March 2001 BA Fine Arts
See More Work: antheakerou.com

Anthea Kerou (b. 1978 NJ, USA) is an American artist with Greek and English roots, who embodies the spirit of evolution and experimentation in the vivid and eclectic realms of art and technology. Her artistic journey began with a deep passion for Fine Arts, evolving into a remarkable 20-year career in 3D character animation.

What themes does your work involve?
As an artist, my goal is to explore a wide range of themes and ideas through my work. From abstract acrylic paintings to collages and resin art, I am constantly experimenting with different mediums and techniques to find new ways of expressing myself. One of my main interests is in using art as a way to transform and transcend difficult emotions like grief and loneliness I have felt in my life.I believe that art has the power to bring beauty and healing, and I strive to create work that resonates with viewers on a deep emotional level. In my art, I am drawn to themes of purity and healing, the sacred and the forgotten, and the wild expansion of the imagination. I am fascinated by the idea of capturing fleeting moments and harnessing them in my work.
Describe your creative process.
As an artist, my goal is to explore a wide range of themes and ideas through my work. From abstract acrylic paintings to collage, augmented reality, and resin art, I am constantly experimenting with different mediums and techniques to find new ways of expressing myself. One of my main interests is in using art as a way to transform and transcend difficult emotions like grief and loneliness I have felt in my life.I believe that art has the power to bring beauty and healing, and I strive to create work that resonates with viewers on a deep emotional level. I would use my residency to create a collaboration of nature and technology, with an augmented reality + fine art, 3D interactive art installation experience. This would be a combination of abstract nature inspired art, and 3D animation.
What influences your work? What inspires you? Why do you make art?
It’s my vision that by taking one small step towards happiness in our own lives we invite the world to become a better place. Essentially it’s our life’s purpose to be happy and share that with others. I am a guide for others to experience their creative wellness from the inside out. I enjoy relaxing meditations through connecting with nature, learning to love myself by tuning into your natural states of joy, gratitude and abundance, and enjoy life by consuming plant based natural, whole, delicious foods.
What is good art? What makes a piece of art great?
For me what makes a good piece of artwork is an indefinable nature of having their own unique essence and emotion imprinted on the artwork. So when the viewer experiences the art, they are in some way transformed, hopefully improved, enlightened, and enhanced their experience of life. I prefer to bring beauty to the world. I believe there is a way to have creative expression, transmuting fears and traumas through beauty.
What is the role of the artist today?
Today's role of artist for me is part healer, part lover, part wayshower. To guide and show others the light within themselves, and to encourage them to take steps on theri self healing journey.

 


This interview was published by Circle Foundation of the Arts. © CFA Press ∙ Images are courtesy of the artist